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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/23/22 in Posts

  1. The Mystery I dug up the old rotted planks and... There was nothing but gravel underneath them. So now I need to grab a half yard to smooh everything out, but at least the shed floor will be stable. Still no idea what they were for originally. Best guess I could come up with was maybe an old tool stand for a compressor, since it's not far from a 30amp outlet. Lighting I got another 10 fixtures installed, and I am loving them. I screwed two fixtures to a piece of 2x2 scrap and hung that from the old fleurescent chains. It's not the prettiest solution, but it does even out the light nicely right over where I'm planning to put the main bench. I'll probably do another bar hanging over the front of the bay and I want to add a line of lights over what will become the stationary tool wall as well. I had originally considered re-using some of my old feit fixtures upstairs, but they'd look pretty bad next to the new ones, so I hung the old fixtures out in the (sadly treasureless) woodshed. Insulation I called the outstanding insulation contractors. One hasn't gotten back to me yet and the other seems to have lost my bid entitely. So with no movement there, I decided to go ahead and tackle the garage doors. Of course, the first thing I did was drive the horn of my lumber rack right into the bottom and mangle the whole damn door. An hour or so of swearing, clamping, and bending and I was able to get the worst of the damage out, fix the wheels that had jumped, and kept my airseal. I went with EPS, for both its cheapness and its relative weight versus XPS. The doors are already becoming a bit of a pain to open, and who knows how long it'll take to get someone out to re-tension the spring and tune the track alignment. I may add another layer of something over the rails, for looks and to help with transfer through the metal bars. A good sharp knife kept the foam pebbles manageable. One door takes three full sheets of foam and an entire roll of aluminum tape, but it already feels nicer working next to it. The most important addition Tunes! I had a little bluetooth speaker setup, but I finally got the old receiver and surround sound shlepped over from the old house and installed. Between the heat (I can hold at around 65 when working during the day), lighting, and sound, the shop is finally at a point I could actually start comfortably working on projects. Obviously I'm not stopping here, but it's very heartening to have the space feeling comfortable. Bonus This cute little fella joined me today for lunch outside.
    6 points
  2. Finally all done…now I am scared to use as a bench and mark up the surface :-)
    6 points
  3. This Sunday update is of the second of the six sides of the M7. Do not judge too severely on the mini checkerboard. The squares do not mesh as they should. The pieces were from a game table I made four years ago, (that is why the table photo is being displayed). When I made the game board for the table these bits were left over from trimming the rows. I glued the pieces up and it this mini board laid around the shop for years before I recycled it into this project. To convey some of the purpose of this design, I uploaded pages from the documentation book which went to the buyer. I hope that the dimensions given clarify the overall size and scope of the venture. Side three pictures will be uploaded in my Wednesday post.
    5 points
  4. Spent a couple hours pushing a saw today. It was 18* in the shop this morning, but I didn't need any heat by the time I got this far. That shine is definitely not my natural glow. I really owe Spanky for this one! The task is actually going fairly well, considering the saw has about twice the teeth it should for this job. Thankfully, once this rip is complete, I'll have pieces that I can manage with machines.
    3 points
  5. (read in a Zeus-on-his-throne type voice ) Be not hindered by those who are blind to your path. I am lucky enough to have a wife who says nothing when I am shopping for yet another clamp, router bit, handsaw, etc. She was puzzled at first as to why I could possibly need ANOTHER clamp (???). She is wise though and notices how much more pleasant I am to live with when I get to visit my shop more often. Sometimes I walk in there and just stand for a while and I feel more relaxed about the world.
    2 points
  6. What do think you will use to sheath the walls inside? Or will you leave the insulation exposed? If I was going to sheath, I'd be sure to mark the sheathing for the locations of those studs, and the uprights. Just looking at that structure now and I think it will have some advantages when it comes to hanging a simple tool rack, and some challenges when it comes to high load shelves.
    2 points
  7. Very nicely done. As wtnhighlander says, it has a job to do. I made it quite a few years before I sawed into mine just the other day. A filler strip of similar species material, a little epoxy. and some touch up with a card scraper and you can hardly see it. Of course it looks like a billboard sign to me
    2 points
  8. @Woodworking_Hobby, don't listen to those people! That bench IS too beautiful for you to use. Pack it up and ship it to me ! Strong work.
    1 point
  9. I resemble being called a yahoo ...Cody needed that.
    1 point
  10. Yes, the feed tables are supposed to provide sup upward force. My planer is an older model, and does not include the adjustable tables, so lifting the ends is my only option.
    1 point
  11. Hello all. I have decided that I have an abundance of time on my hands (sorry, even I had to laugh at that.) and so, we decided to remodel the kitchen. This will be no easy undertaking because we have decided that at the same time, we will be replacing the entire first floor with hardwood floors (currently tile) So, the wife loves the Maple vanity I built for the upstairs bathroom, so we are going with maple again. Thought it would be a nice change of pace from the dark outdated oak we currently have. Looking around the internet, I have come across a lot of cross talk about whether or not the base should be 1 piece along with the carcasses, or to build a separate base that can be leveled and then the carcasses set on top of a level work surface. I am going with the later. There is something kind of cheesy looking about the outer side pieces having 1 continuous board from top to bottom with the toe kick notched out. I like the offset look. plus, the option to level the base and come back and just plunk down the bulky part of the cabinet seems just better somehow. This will be my biggest project to date and maybe forever (lol), so I am calculating everything I possibly can, to minimize waste and heartache. Wood can be plain, or beautiful from board to board. My question is Is it best to buy your wood from one location? I have a "Wood cart" near by that sells slab wood of many species. I could go this route and try to mill up the wood myself. My planer (dewalt 735x with wings) is um... well... it works, but it does this weird thing where as the board is feeding, it sort of pauses or slips and its not really snipe, but its... well, a slight gouge maybe 1/32" about 2 to 3" in on the feed side of the board happens. Then the rest of the process is perfect. So.. do I get some S4S boards?! Do I take my planer to a specialist and get back to trying to mill up my own stuff? I tend to put positive pressure on the board as it begins feeding into the planer to try to prevent the pause. Sometimes it works, sometimes it does not. I have a joiner, which could do a portion of the milling, but not all. I also have a bandsaw with a 3/4" rip blade and a 1/2" blade as well. Do I hand sand all the boards after sending them through my own planer? I have had good luck running the boards through my table saw and flipping them over end over end raising the blade a little each time. Any suggestions or thoughts would help. I get a lot of compliments on my vanity, so I am hoping to have similar luck, but on a grander scale :)
    1 point
  12. Honestly... Now might be the time to take a framing hammer and give it a nice whack . Just to get over the fear of dinging it up.
    1 point
  13. Or to show that he can handle 18* temps in a tee!
    1 point
  14. Hats off to you Ross, that’s old school stuff right there
    1 point
  15. Beautiful piece of work!
    1 point
  16. bare with me highlander, but isnt that what you make adjustments on the router are kind of doing? I feel like I read somewhere to have the ever slightest camber upward on the infeed and outfeed. That true flat might give you snipe when the wheel grab and begin feeding the wood? I will not doubt need to recheck all my settings as it has been a long while since I adjusted the router. I intend to clean the rollers off as soon as I get a day off. This Thursday I think... Thanks for the advice in advance and for previous advice.
    1 point
  17. That is a beautiful piece of work, and you should be proud! But in the end, it is a tool to help you make other beautiful pieces of work, so don't fret, let it do its job.
    1 point
  18. Really nice looking, job well done. Just start using it, don't worry about dinging it, it's going to happen and there is nothing you can do to stop it. When it does you can breath a sigh of relief and get on with life. The other thing you can do is go out and give it a wap with a hammer and get on with life right now.
    1 point
  19. I have a Ridgid dedicated spindle sander and a combo belt/disc sander, mounted on a rotating table, so just the footprint of one machine. On the occasion where my spindle sanding sleeve slips on the rubber roller, I find that wrapping each end of the roller with a round or two of blue tape, helps considerably.
    1 point
  20. I plan on getting a dedicated disc sander so I will go with the spindle only option Thanks Thanks Mark Sounds nasty We don't get real cold here in winter, sometimes down to 0c (32f) overnight to 14c (57f) during the day but I'll take that into consideration thanks
    1 point
  21. Rock on. I stole the idea from one of the smaller yards I use. In the immortal words of Butch Cassidy "Well, that oughta do it . . . " At least the space I needed cleared out is nearly done. Just a few long sticks to put up on the wall racks and I'm good.
    1 point
  22. I love the idea of that rail and movable dividers. Will probably be stealing that idea shortly for my own vertical racks.
    1 point
  23. Not really any tuning, but lubing, and installing a table lift. I bought this lift system off ebay years ago. I have two Powermatic 1150's. One a belt changer, and the other a Reeves drive. I put off deciding which one to put the lift on, but the Reeves drive requires some work if I let it set for a long time. This old belt changer is 100% reliable, and really is easy to change the belt on, so I decided to get this one going. I have a strong rope attached to a chain that I use the loader to lift some things. I tied the rope around the column. The hard part was getting the base off. I ended up ruining a HF 4 pound dead blow hammer, but did get it off. To get the base back on, I used the dead blow hammer to lean against a cribbing block, and a 10 pound sledge hammer. The bigger hammer worked. Serial number lookup says it was made between 1964 and 68, and I don't think the base has ever been off of it. I thought about taking the column all the way off, and soaking it in rust remover, but I'm fixing it because I need to use it, so don't have time to worry about cosmetics. It spins dead true, and I can change the belt position in less than 30 seconds without getting in a hurry. The table lift is slow, but smooth and accurate. I think it will be easier to use it for adjusting some hole depths than the limit stop, which is in itself one of my favorite things about this beast. I don't know how much it weighs, but it's more than it looks like. I bought it from a school auction in 1975 that I also brought an 8" jointer home from. I've used it that long without a table lift mechanism, but it will finally be a pleasure to use it like this. I have a Lee Valley table coming for it. I didn't want bright red or blue, and I like the LV fence. No time to make one.
    1 point
  24. I love my HF dc. It’s about the only thing I can hear now days
    1 point
  25. Congrats. This is an exciting time in your life. Your planned space is remarkably like my current effort documented here. Goodness knows I percolated over every idea that appealed to me that I have seen over the years. I was brutal about throwing out as well as about keeping certain ideas. Some great ideas got tossed due to them not being a good fit for my methods or, more often, for my budget. I also gave up some things that I wanted in order to have other things that I REALLY wanted ;-) I gave up on upgrading a couple of machines in order to have the DC Shed. Housing the cyclone outside of the shop was a 'gotta-have' for me on this build so I made some tough decisions. Maybe the thread will give you some ideas and pre-warn you about stumbling blocks I ran into.
    1 point