Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/21/21 in all areas

  1. This week I decided it was time to make a couple upgrades to my existing tool. First I replaced my 1950's Craftsman jointer with a new Grizzly 6" jointer. Then I I upgraded my crappy HF 8" drill press with a new 12" Grizzly drill press. I decided to mount it to my large Husky too box. To do this I had to move my spindle sander to my small Husky tool box. This is where I had my old drill press mounted. I originally put the new one on it but I decided it felt to unstable.
    12 points
  2. The look with finish and hardware. And the client dropped by. They both had big smiles and were very pleased. I work for a 2 part paycheck. The money and pleasing the client. Naturally I like money but the clients with a big grin and many not begged for accolades is a big part of the paycheck. Pleasing clients motivates me too.
    12 points
  3. From Spurtleville, a small hamlet SE of Houston. We are going to Louisiana tomorrow to visit some of my wife’s relatives and she asked if I would make a couple of these as gifts. Thanks Dave!
    10 points
  4. And from Spurtleville North, a small hamlet west of Dubuque, great minds think alike @Coop, gave my last 2 to Jan’s sister who was in town, had to make another batch, those look great Coop !
    7 points
  5. This thing is getting heavy! After wrestling it to the floor I cleaned up the sides with a #5 set very fine. I wiped them down with some paint thinner to get an idea what it will look like. Not too shabby I think.
    6 points
  6. Frank Miller lumber in Union city, Ind. One of the largest mills for QSWO. I have been dealing with them for years. They deal in lumber by freight cars on trains. For us they have the retail desk. Not retail prices. The last batch I got from them looks beautiful. Sometimes looks are deceiving. After I dressed the oak first a face on the jointer then the thickness planer. Some of the boards would loose their flatness after being planed. Some would dress flat and distort after I'd rip it. One of the benefits of using qswo is the lack of distortion. I called the mill and after a few pictures they gave me a full credit. Over the years there have been a few issues with other mills. Before I could explain they refused. I never expected a full credit. I am pleased and amazed.
    5 points
  7. Found a piece from my thicknessed stack large enough and with an OK color match to the front to cut a new left side from. For the right side I needed to go to a fresh board and do the complete milling evolution. Anyway, both now cut to the correct length and ready to start over
    5 points
  8. No rule of thumb on this one. Some folks go with a wall full of horizontal cleats every 6-8 inches. This lets you put small fixtures in place with a high degree of flexibility. I make larger fixtures that have small items in them. These pics are from the temp shop currently in use. The cleats were one of the first things to go up. I find 3 or 4 long cleats at heights that hang at the "right" height work best for me. The "right" height for me is not so high I can't reach my long clamps and not so low that the lower fixture hits the ground. In between things should hang from one cleat and rest against the next one or two down. I don't bother with cutouts for the cabinets to set flush. This would kill my flexibility with this system. I need to be able hang most things most places as I change things . . . like my mind Here's one iteration of the old shop: In the end it seems you could decide on Lots-o-Cleats: Or a few cleats and then design your fixtures from there.
    5 points
  9. I upgraded the lighting in my shop today. It previously only had 4 single bulb fixtures so I had to have task lighting at every tool and bench. I installed 10 4ft LED and it is fantastic! Also my wife has demanded that I buy myself a sawstop, so it’s a rough life. Just need to decide on the final build specs and hope the wait time isn’t too long.
    5 points
  10. Started on the sliding tail vise hardware installation yesterday. Had to mill out a 7/16" deep mortise for the main body of the internal slider to fit in. I used the LN Router plane and it worked great. This top is REALLY heavy Testing the fit to make sure the jaw will slide freely Now I have to hog out a 2" wide by 9" long by 3/4" deep dado on the bottom of the bench so that once installed the vise can be adjusted.
    5 points
  11. I stumbled on the fastest, and easiest way to perfectly cut in casing, and baseboards this morning. I put up a new ceiling, and needed to paint the Dining Room in a lake rental house. I had watched a youtube video titled something like "caulking your masking tape", and decided to give it a try. I'm probably fairly good at cutting in with a brush, especially on casing, but the top of a baseboard is no fun for me. I've tried several types of masking tape, including Frog tape, as was used in the video. I've never been That impressed with Frog tape. The caulking method involves putting caulking over the working edge of the tape, painting over it while it's still wet, and pulling the tape off before it dries. I bought a tube of clear, latex caulking to use for this trial, but once I got into it, I decided to skip the caulking step. I tried both Frog Tape, and 3M 2093 Sharp Lines tape. I like how the 3M tape works coming off the roll better, so I only did one side of door casing with the Frog tape. It worked like a charm. I think pulling it off while the paint is still wet lets the paint part cleanly at the edge of the tape, whereas otherwise, it comes off leaving some kind of a jagged edge. I put the 2093 on, and contrary to 3M's directions, I didn't wait 20 minutes for it to set. I used a fairly stiff, cheap paintbrush to make sure it was sealed down good, as I rolled it out. The wood trim in this room is natural finished Pine, and the walls painted this time with S-W Emerald Vanillin, sort of a very pale yellow. After I had done several sections, I timed myself, without getting in a hurry, on a 16' baseboard. From the start of putting the tape on, including painting with a brush, and pulling the tape off, it was close to exactly 3 minutes. It's faster, and easier for me to do this, as good as I am at cutting in vertical casing, on any of this trim. Now, none of this old stuff had been caulked to the point of having a fillet at the joining line of the parts, so that made it some easier. I pulled off a little of the tape to start a section, and reverse rolled it off with the tape roll being held directly against the wall, so it came off in exactly the correct plane. I never did open that tube of caulking. If you read the instructions for the 2093 tape, you will see I didn't follow the instructions. I had that complete room painted today, and cleaned up, ready to move furniture back in tomorrow. I did have to do some sheetrock touchup, and priming those spots to start with this morning. https://www.scotchblue.com/3M/en_US/...4340561&rt=rud I used 3/4" tape. The whole floor was masked, because I sprayed the new ceiling, so there was little worry about the wet paint on the tape, as it came off, getting on anything that mattered. I wish I had known this long ago.
    4 points
  12. You guys are a little older than me, but I'm still working more than full time. I figure I'll work until 10 o'clock on the morning of my funeral.
    4 points
  13. The top is done, I had a bit of a drum sander incident. When you hear a tic-tic sound evidently it is a sign your paper is about wore out . When it did wear out I wound up with a pretty significant burnt gouge on one side of the top. Anyway, changed to 120 grit and sanded a bit further than I was planning to to remove the damage. The top is now .71 inches instead of .75. Gentle rounding off still to come... Also glued the stock for the cove to a carrier board to make the routing a little safer and sanded to 5/8 thick. This molding will make the transition from the base to the case.
    4 points
  14. After a lot of fiddling and fussing the 24" face vise is completed. We are in the home stretch now, the sliding tail vise is the last phase........ No racking at all in this vise and it is a smooth operator, I am definitely going to be spoiled with this!
    4 points
  15. Did a little rearranging and cutting to length.
    4 points
  16. I’ve often wondered why they call the guy standing next to the groom, “The Best Man”? Obviously to the bride he’s not.
    4 points
  17. I wrapped up some time consuming but minor steps on the bathroom remodel. As a break I worked on getting some french cleat storage in my garage. I made a couple bins that hand on the wall for some various items. I"m getting to the point where i have enough storage spots where i have empty space. The cleats are separated by 6" which is working out quite nice. The cleats were ripped in half from 5.5" stock. I"m toying with the idea of painting the cleats the color of the walls or hitting them with a clear finish to match the trim... trim is birch, cleats are BB ply. If any ones has some good ideas for must additions for french cleat storage let me know.
    3 points
  18. I like the finish General Arm-r -seal semi gloss. It looked real good. Until I got to the dresser top. I could not work fast enough to flow it out. It leaves brush marks. I have received very good advice but still the same problem of running out of time. All the rest on this project was perfect because less time was needed being smaller parts. Then I talked to the local Ben Moore paint store. His first question was am I varnishing in AC. That was the answer. The heat reduced my working time. I brought the top in the house and had plenty of time to work it. The advice I received on the internet was consistent but wrong for me because I live in hotter long summers. The advice was well intended but not for my climate. The product is exceptional. But no large surfaces in warm climates. The temperature was in the low 80's early in the day. Not good enough. I set the AC at 71 overnight.
    3 points
  19. Most every day of the long Florida summer, I start early but I stop around 10 or 11. On my funeral day, I hope a long time from now, I'm taking the morning off! Going fishing! My iPhone tracks my walking. I walk much faster and farther when the temperatures are 80 or less. I did not realize that until I saw that on my phone. I bet I burn more calories walking slowly in the heat than fast in comfortable weather. When this furniture gets delivered in a week or so I will take more pictures which will include the elegant touch of the ladie of the house.
    3 points
  20. Finally got around to building it. The 1/4” stock holds the saw solidly. I am going to tie down the switch (maybe with some twine) and use my foot switch for on/off. Have one small countersink to redo, but all is well.
    3 points
  21. Tool recommendation of the day. At the beginning of this project I picked up 2 new sawblades from Ridge Carbide. One was a flat top blade ground for a dovetail angle, nice but what can you say? The other is their 10" 48 tooth TS2000 Ultra Combo blade. WOW, this thing really cuts cleanly. The 21" crosscuts on the top panel was flawless. It'll also cut plywood with zero chip out on the bottom and the cut is polished. Anyway, just thought I'd pass that along. Expensive but they really perform.
    3 points
  22. The dust collection fairy dropped off a few parts I still needed to make my current inventory flesh out to the new design.
    3 points
  23. A little bit is unrolled, off the roll, to start the application. The roll of tape is then held flat against the wall, and moved down the line against the way it comes off the roll, so the roll pushes it down in place. Like a tire rolling down the road, but rotating the wrong way. It goes in place right as it comes off the roll. This would not work if there is fillet (little cove) of caulking. In this case, the trim was natural finished wood, with painted walls. The adjoining parts were not caulked, so it was a nice, sharp right angle. It eliminates human error in laying down a length of masking tape, and goes along fairly fast. If I do caulk such a joint, I make sure the caulking only goes where it's needed, and doesn't build up past the plane of the trim. Pam says I need to take a video. I'm sure that's an important part of why this way is so fast. For the crown molding, I rolled the top of the wall, and painted the bottom cove part of the crown, before putting it up. No tape, and no cutting in needed. Here's the room. I hate 8' ceilings. We thought about tearing this house down, and building a good one, but it has enough redeeming features to be worth keeping. Also, a picture of the stained popcorn ceiling. I just put that ceiling up over top of the sheetrock. The paper "catchers" on the sides of the window are to catch a little bit of sheetrock mud sanding dust, where I took the old curtain rod down. I didn't want to drag out the random orbit sander, vacuum, and supplied air just for those two spots.
    3 points
  24. That may be a while, guessing at least a month to finish construction. 80 or so dovetails in the drawers... Slowly working my way across the back, drill the countersink for the screws, drill the bigger clearance for the shank, cleanup the faces with the #4, pop in a couple of shims to set the spacing and drill the 2 holes top and bottom. Then of course you need to run in a steel screw with the impact driver, back it out and replace with the brass screw
    3 points
  25. That's too bad, Coop. I did the same thing, but flipping it over for a day exposed the other side to enough humidity that it flattened out, and I quickly slapped a backer on it. Been using the board ever since.
    3 points
  26. Starting on the back which are a 6 & 5/8 wide ship lapped arrangement.
    3 points
  27. I made an end grain checker board a couple of years ago and used 1/4” ply as a substrate. I talked of my plans on here and someone mentioned applying the same material to the backside to keep a “ balanced panel” I ignored the recommendation and ended up with a checkered cistern. Learned the hard way.
    3 points
  28. Thanks! Funny you should mention that. On the way home I get a text hey dad I bought you some truffles but forgot to give them to you so not only does he get my daughter he gets my chocolate too lol. Lucky for me he is very nice and more importantly is really good for, and too, our daughter
    3 points
  29. You are doing a great job on the Chest of Drawers! Don't be so hard on yourself, a little bit of sawdust, (which it looks from the pics that you may have a little of that around ) and some ca glue, and you are in business! You have done a much better job than I could do at this point! Keep up the good work!
    2 points
  30. Ace hardware has wood stretchers. Found near the left handed monkey wrenches...
    2 points
  31. 2 points
  32. Thanks Richard! Only thing is I am beyond young. I just looked up for age on your profile and I am younger than you by 8 years. So I guess young'un works fine.
    2 points
  33. Ya done good young'un. Real good.
    2 points
  34. Glue up for the top, 21"*40" is the target size. I've got about 5/8 of extra length, we'll see how this works out. Would not normally cut is so close but the plank the 3 pieces came from was 122'ish inches long.
    2 points
  35. Those are great @JohnG, I have 5 in my small shop/garage and going to add 1 more over the router table
    2 points
  36. My Veritas has been in use for about 4 years. Although there is a cover on this design it is hardly air tight. When I opened it to adjust chain tension after the first several months of use there was saw dust present. None of this effected the action and I would have never known had I not wanted to tighten up the chain a bit. It seems the same "non-air-tight" design that let's the spoil in, lets it out as you use the vise.
    2 points
  37. Thanks! I’m honored, coming from the crown prince of Spurtleville!
    2 points
  38. As if you need a reason to appreciate your parents more, watch this. https://www.google.com/search?q=mother+by+john+lennon&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en-us&client=safari
    2 points
  39. There is no standard spacing. Do what ever you think will work for your space. I put these in with 18" separating the cleats as i was going to use it for large objects. I should have done 24" of separation as most of the bottom middle cleat is unusable. A single cleat around the top permitier of a shop could be useful. Kind of like picture frame hanging molding.
    1 point
  40. I'm guessing the funeral is at noon then.
    1 point
  41. Earlier I moved the end bench (2000 Bayside Elite) to the side to give us more walking space the length of the pop up. By doing that we also gained better access to astorage area beside the fridge. In some campers that space might be a cassette commode. In ours it’s a hole. (A useless, clutter-collecting black hole.) Now that it is accessible we wanted to make the most of it. We used a “camping box” for 30+ years that the wife’s folks had gotten in the mid 60s but the space and size were getting old. That hole gave us the opportunity to eliminate the big box for one that will drop in. 16x16x21. Set the shelves to the height needed by your camping experience. It just drops in. The dowel approach was used to air movement. I also modified the lid. The hinge is gone in favor of a lip and slot along with a bumper on the front to keep it from sliding off. Parting with the hinge allowed an extra inch of depth. All that remains is to put a block on the floor so that it doesn’t rub the rear light wires in the bottom of the hole.
    1 point
  42. Yes, beaded board plywood, but better stuff than the box stores keep in stock. I ordered it through a regular building supply store. It's much smoother than the stuff in the box stores, to start with. Rolled with oil based primer, sanded with 320, and sprayed with Pro Classic. The "boards" are cut from box store MDF. That's my pretty standard ceiling for 8' ceilings. I put that one up by myself, which was a pretty slow go. I bought some brackets for holding the crown molding up, and wish I'd had them 40 years ago. They made putting the crown up easier than with helpers. I'll post some more pictures, once I download them into the computer.
    1 point
  43. Correct. ASTM-2729 and the like. They are seldom in stores but places like Lowe's carry Charlotte Pipe and NDS products. You need to order them but, a couple of fittings quickly reaches the price that qualifies for free shipping. These were about $24 versus the $40 for schd-40 or $100+clamps for steel. I don't buy these items often but, find I source them differently nearly every time. At one point Ace Hardware Online had a great price on 6" ASTM-2729 pipe so when I bought I bought extra. This time around Lowe's had the best 'price to my door' so I ordered a few wyes, elbows and caps from them. It really pays to shop around on these things. The price swing can be significant and apparently varies with vendor and the point in time that you order.
    1 point
  44. I was thinking it would break too but if it's just my family who has them I can always make another. I think with more practice and/or setting up the bandsaw better I could do it in 30 minutes.
    1 point
  45. i've thought of that as well but i think it would crack/break over time because the wood is thin and subject to a lot of stress, a stripe of different wood on the handle if you're using two different types of wood for the spurtle itself would be cool, never really paid much attention to the time it takes to make one, i'm guessing 30 minutes, but i've made a lot of them and tend to make them in batches of 10 or more
    1 point
  46. Getting a little freaked out @Coop, you got me by 1, 14 to 15 is my count, wouldn’t mind having a brother, I’ll split the DNA test with you
    1 point
  47. I would probably do something like that. Also on some shaker pieces you will see were the back panels are finished with something like white or gray milk paint. In the end it is in an area that isn't really seen once the piece is in place.
    1 point
  48. That’s probably why they are groomsmen and bridesmaids, not bridesmen and groomsmaids.
    1 point