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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/07/2022 in all areas

  1. Well, you ain’t going to believe this…I still can’t believe it. The backstory is that several (7?) years ago I watched a fellow woodworker buy a Rinkon 20” bandsaw for ~$1200 on an auction here in town and I thought “someday, I’m going to have one too”. So the hunt began for a large 16”+ bandsaw that could be used for resawing, but I’m cheap and didn’t want to spend as much as Steve did. This weekend P and went to an auction 90 minutes away and stood in the blistering heat for 5 hours to watch some woodworking tools sell. The auction had a Woodmaster 24” drum sander, a 3Hp UniSaw, a Grizzly shaper and lathe with copier, and (most importantly) a 18” Jet bandsaw. Well, we goofed…we should have bought the drum sander ($350), the UniSaw ($475 with outfeed table) and the lathe ($350)…but they hadn’t sold the bandsaw yet. We ended up winning the bandsaw for $450. Yes, I said four hundred and fifty dollars for a $3000 bandsaw…with 3 resaw blades (a ¾”, a 1”, and a 1.25”). Tuned ‘er up quick last night and cut a skinny 1/16” veneer out of a block of maple. Whoa, this thing is cool. Let’s just say that there’s a strong chance of seeing more book matched panels in our future projects. Oh, and I bought a OIT floor-model drill press for $100 and 5 pieces of 24 x 36 mirror glass for $3 (total). The mirror glass is slated for an upcoming Mission bathroom mirror build. You can see the drill press in the bottom-right corner of the picture. All-in-all a great day for us boys.
    10 points
  2. After about a month break i made it back into my shop for a quick project. Megan needed a table for mid night feeding sessions to set items. We have a char set up in our bedroom but no good side table. Beings that this is a temporary use I just threw together a base out of birch scraps and 2x4s. The top was salvaged and stored from a previous project. Hazel is for all intents and purposes sleeping through the night, in 2 hour shifts with feedings in between. This results in waking up 3 times a night to change the diaper and feed.
    7 points
  3. Finished. Just need to secure it to the bench. Then clean up the mess!
    7 points
  4. I glued up the original walnut boards for the top and squared the ends using a circ saw and straight edge. I moved the straight edge over a 1/16” or so and used a hand held router and an up cut straight bit to really clean up the ends. As mentioned, the bb ends will be attached using the domino and draw bore dowels. The hole in the center tenon will be 1/4” and the others will be elongated to allow for wood movement, I cut homemade tenons to 1.5” wide. The mortises in the top were cut using the Domino in three separate plunges. Thanks @Chestnut! I cut the bb ends to size and marked the center lines for the mortises to correspond to the marks on the top. The mortises in the bb ends were cut to extend 1/8” on both sides of those in the top, except for the center ones and they are 1.5” wide. The tenons are then glued into the mortises in the top. These will be rigid. While the glue dried, I rounded over the front and back edges with a 1/16” round over bit. Using the centerline marks on the bb ends, I drilled 1/4” holes, 1/2” from the inside edges. I then slid the bb ends onto the tenons on the top, clamped the ends to the top and using the same 1/4” Fortsner bit, I marked the holes into the tenons. I then extended these marks 1/16” of an inch closer to the edge adjoining the top panel to allow for the draw bore dowel. I then drilled two 1/4” holes in each tenon, thus making the hole 1/2” wide to allow for movement. The holes were cleaned up using a chisel and rat tail file. After dry fitting the pieces together, I removed the ends and cut 1/4” dowels and tapered one end to help guide it thru the holes in the tenon. I applied glue to the two center tenons and mortises as well as in these holes. The three pieces were then put back into clamps. The two center dowels were tapped into place, extending proud of the top and bottom. The remains dowels were then hammered in and glue was applied to the top ends of the dowel and tapped in further about 1/16” or so to secure it but not so far that the glue would reach the tenon. With the glue wiped clean, I’ll let this set overnight and trim the dowels off tomorrow.
    6 points
  5. So the Cubs are playing the Reds tonight at the Field of Dreams about 20 minutes west of here, great place and I’ve been there many times but not tonight, tickets were by a drawing and I didn’t get the chance to get a pair, just as well as they were around $450.00 each, some people sold theirs others got tickets online for up to 4 grand I’ve heard, $11.00 beer, $7.00 water and $10.00 hotdogs, the airport here had as many as 45 private jets fly in along with 3 commercial jets carrying the teams and executive people
    4 points
  6. Drew, it couldn’t have worked out more perfectly. I picked 1.5” as the width of my tenon and using the 5 mm bit, drilling the outside holes first, the inside third hole cleaned out the mortise nicely. Thanks.
    4 points
  7. It's done. I managed to resotre the french polish. So it looks like the first pic in this tread. There a a couple of small spots near corners that just will not get as shiny as the rest but really not noticeable unless you are looking for it. I am letting the shellac cure while I decide if I want to wax the box. For sure it will be hand buffed if I wax it.
    4 points
  8. All we accomplished on it this morning was to pick up the rest of the materials to finish. Lumber prices have come down a lot. 2x12x16 was $45, so about half what it was a few months ago. 2x4's still seem pretty high though. This is $396 worth of treated lumber. We were able to pick mostly clear pieces. I'm going to swap out that board with the big knot in the previous picture. Made the weekly bird seed stop. Yes, they ride fine up there.
    4 points
  9. Had a pretty crazy thunderstorm on Friday that included the loudest thunder I’ve ever heard. Found out a tree across the street from us was hit by lightning.
    4 points
  10. Woke up this morning with a dog in labor, but she was finished delivering by 10, so we worked on the dock again. All the outside bands are set, and everything cleaned up. Materials list in the truck for tomorrow. I was going to take a picture, but had been in the water all morning, so laid my phone on the dock. The Sun was out, so it was too hot to operate when I tried to take a picture. I'll run back down there later and take a picture. I had to cut a big chunk out of that end post on the right to get a plumb section to support the band. It looks pretty good now though, even without the last section decked. Picture is making the shoulder cut with the top of the chainsaw bar. It fit perfectly, and no fine tuning of the post was needed after the chainsaw. I had screwed a 2x4 to support that last band at the correct height, and left it long enough to be able to push the band to the side for chainsaw clearance. That 2x4 also supported the scaffold plank in this position. No tools were ever dropped in the lake. I didn't realize SIL had been taking pictures. She had a paddleboard to pick up pieces of wood kicked in the lake. I'll trim the decking boards after they've dried some more. .
    4 points
  11. After an hour and a half of planing these down to 3/4” and jointing the edges, the new walnut is not nearly as dark as I would like. The original boards are darker and have a bit of red in them. Even my wife commented on this. So bb ends it will be and thanks @Chestnut for mentioning making my own domino tenons. Making them wider will also give me more surface area to make my elongated holes for the draw bore holes for the dowels on all but the center one. I’ll save these for future projects.
    4 points
  12. I had to sell my tickets as the runway is not long enough for my plane. Seriously though, I bet that’s a neat deal!
    3 points
  13. Woke this one up to add that I used the fixture as a tenon jig this morning on some planters for LOML. Worked fine.
    3 points
  14. We finished the structure, and the rest of the decking. I'll let it dry for a while, put the other screws in, and trim the edges straight even with the old bands. I'm going to add a layer of 2x12's over the outside to come up flush with the tops of the decking boards. My BIL had to leave, so we put some old boards across the posts so I can handle the 2x12's by myself. I'll let the decking boards dry out for several days before the next step. I'm not sure how long, but I'll check to make sure they've done what moving they're going to do. I have some extra boards to replace any that need it.
    3 points
  15. I use the Stop Loss bags. I like them. I have had satin ARS in a bag as long as a year and ended up using every drop of it. It's easy to mix the product before use without introducing any bubbles into the product. Just be sure to follow the directions and remove the air from the bag after each use. As for filling the bag - easy - put the collapsable funnel over the top of an open can of product. Insert the bag nozzle into the small end of the funnel. Turn the whole works upside down holding the can and letting the bag sit on the bench. Hold the can fimly and poke a hole in the bottom of the can (which is now on top). The product flows into bag. Take the bag off the funnel and screw the cap on. Take the funnel off the can and set it aside so the product lining the funnel dries and then peal the product out of the funnel. Always wipe the bag nozzle after use so dried product does not build up so fast.
    3 points
  16. I think we do. My main provider here Youndblood lumber sold out for condo's a few year's ago. Drew has had good luck with a place in St Cloud I have yet to get up there. Ronn Thanks for sharing!! ...oh and no offense to anyone on the forum but I really wish this slab phase would pass so that we could all go back to rough sawn lumber
    3 points
  17. So i thought i would post an epilogue and close this out in case some of you were wondering how this came out, well after 2 trips to the hand surgeon and one more to go i get to keep the thumb , its still beat up and healing slowly and a bandage change twice a day, but the good news is i'm back in the shop ! it does not have a lot of feeling in it and the Dr says it will take a year to look like a thumb again, it looks like a thumb now just with an 1/8" kerf in it that hurts when i bump/hit it wrong and yes the first thing i made were a lot of push sticks. looking back i think my biggest mistake was that i got too comfortable around that saw, that and not using a push stick for a cut i've made thousands of times, there is a little PTSD if that's the right word, i look at that saw running and think how in the &^*$ did i stick my thumb in that running blade ? it has made me think more when making cuts, even and especially ones that i've made many, many times. if this helps even one of you think a little more about saw safety i'll be glad, and yes i've gotten some flack from my friends that own Saw Stop table saws and when this saw wears out i will consider it at the top, one because this would not have happened and two i think its a good saw
    3 points
  18. FYI, DeWalt has issued a recall notice for one of its saws: https://www.emergencyemail.org/newsemergency/anmviewer.asp?a=29847&z=63
    2 points
  19. Every time there is a new post to this thread I again have a look at the pics and am amazed all over again by both the design and execution. I don't think I'd ever get tired of that kitchen.
    2 points
  20. I am not sure Kentucky really falls into the "SouthEast US" category, but here I am. I am retired, 64, single, and enjoying life. I have two home hobby shops packed with tools and machines. Unfortunately, I have more money than energy, so I have been struggling with forcing myself to get out there and just start making ... something! My focus at the moment is Halloween. I have sort of volunteered (more accurately, BEEN volunteered) to assist in making haunted house props, and it is challenging. Tombstones that move, floating books, and facades for AtmosFX projected zombies, spiders, and such. This year we are going to try to follow the Disney Haunted Mansion theme, complete with the floating Madam Leota head, and other special effects. We are crafty guys, but we don't have Elon Musk's money. Joe
    2 points
  21. Oh good, now I can store my ARS as a pint, fifth lor whole bottle>>>>>>>
    2 points
  22. He is in and old factory that made millwork for years and years. Doesn't really look like a store but then he has only just started improving the space.
    2 points
  23. Pam breastfed, so we just put the tiny ones in bed with us, and she could feed them without waking up completely. First one was a Preemie, so Pam had to pump while he was in the hospital. She got so good at massaging a clog out that we never have a dog that gets mastitis now. She can handle it quickly. We stayed in the hospital as much as we could, so Pam could feed him. One old Nurse finally told the Doctor in charge to let us take that baby home. He was the only, or at least the first baby they let leave the hospital weighing less than 5 pounds. He's 39 now, and a fine, strapping specimen of a man.
    2 points
  24. It's more of a 3 hour from beginning to beginning of feedings but that works out to 2 hours of sleep so it takes us 10 hours to get 8 hours of sleep. The last few nights i wake up to a very loud BM and then fussing almost perfectly timed. I let it go for a while to see if she'll go back to sleep but never does. I try and grab her before it gets to crying as she gets her self worked up and it goes from fussing to screaming for 2 hours. It's just easier to not let it get to screaming. Also the frequency is more for mom's comfort than babies stomach. I'll never know what a clogged milk duct feels like. My 3M work tunes are getting some good use. When she is inconsolable i just pop on an audiobook and do my best to comfort her. I now also understand why our family members over 60 all have hearing aids.
    2 points
  25. He can't take criticism of his product. He gets into heated verbal arguments with anyone that has anything less then glowing praise of his product. As nice as Marc is I think he even had a little go around with the owner. I saw one on Youtube a month or so and the YouTuber was posting the responses he was getting from the owner and the guy is a complete jerk.
    2 points
  26. I too am not a big fan of slabs but I’m not so sure that slabs are an influence on the availability of rough sawn lumber. One of my suppliers, the closest and most expensive, has ramped up his supply of slabs. Based on the asking price, I would say his inventory of slabs is probably 5% of his stock and it’s a sizable place. 2-3 years ago I would see 8-10 slabs in one of his warehouses. Now he probably has 50-60. Based on the asking price of the slabs, it’s obviously a profitable niche for them. However, based on the size and configuration of the slabs, I doubt that too many bf of usable lumber could be obtained from them.
    2 points
  27. She also gets the house and the back yard. I just go in the shop and close the door . . .
    2 points
  28. Nothing fancy here. LOML has a couple of fiberglass log planters meaning they look sort of like hollow logs but hold plants. The pig (her pet, my misery) likes to nibble or just plain knock over some of her plants and she would like these raised up a bit. I knocked out a quick design. She OK'd the idea and I started milling redwood. I needed some 1-1/2" square sticks to cut legs from. I quarter-rounded the long edges and cut them to length; about 13". I want to keep the joinery simple. I will notch each leg and lap-joint the stretchers. Once the day warms up I will retreat from the yard to the shop and post more progress. OK, six legs of each profile, six legs per stand. I cut the half laps at the tablesaw. Two outer cuts and then a chop to remove the waste. These are fence boards and the spoil just pops out clean. I'm not going too precision on these things. I gang them with tape and rough draw a rounded corner. I free hand it at the disc sander. I also use the disc to bevel the tops and bottoms of the legs. The Re-Store is great for picking up stainless hardware on the cheap. Here's the stand. And here's the planter. She's happy so, I'm happy.
    2 points
  29. Nicely done Coop and a great description on how to do drawbore as well.
    1 point
  30. I tend to try a lot of things that don't work. But I like to think outside of the box. So once in a while, I can make something work, while everyone told me it wasn't possible. I am not a woodworker, in that I could never build a beautiful guitar, or a piano, or a grandfather clock. Most of my experience with wood has been more along the lines of custom redwood decks, patio covers, things that can have a 1/4" error here and there, and still LOOK good! I really admire people who can patiently work on a project like you guys do. I have thought about taking a woodworker's community college course, but I would probably fail, because I just cannot seem to finish A before I move on to B. Then C comes along, and I don't know if A will ever be finished. Joe
    1 point
  31. "If you build it, they will come" ...and they'll pay a lot of money, too.
    1 point
  32. This is supposed to be good stuff, recommended by someone I trust who is an expert on finishing. He did entry doors with this, and says it's held up better than anything so far. If spraying. https://www.targetcoatings.com/product/emtech-em9300-wb-exterior-polycarbonate-urethane/ For more traditional marine varnishes, look at Totalboat products. I used their Lust varnish brushed on entry doors, and although it's just short term so far, I'm very pleased with it for a brushed on finish. Multiple coats in one day.
    1 point
  33. I've heard of coconut oil being used as a polish/conditioner for wood. It can take years for coconut oil to go rancid (for the same reason it's solid at room temperature apparently), and most cutting boards need refinishing before that point. I think I'll stick to the mineral oil and wax blends on my cutting board and coconut oil on my skin (coconut oil + baking soda is the best way to get house paint off your skin/nails I've yet found).
    1 point
  34. I'd be willing to bet money it's been gas.
    1 point
  35. He also claims that he’s received death threats from “big chemical” and “big finish” for threatening their sales.
    1 point
  36. Through the MInnesota Wood workers guild I heard about a new lumber source that is just now opening. I stopped up today, got a tour and heard about his plans. Sean Kaysen is the owner. Right now he has mostly slabs on display but has plans to offer rough saw and dimensioned mostly domestic hardwoods once things get moving. He is also setting up a custom furniture shop. He mills and dries is own lumber. North Wind Lumber 1505 Central Ave NE Minneapolis, Minnesota 55413 Open 7 days a week
    1 point
  37. 39 pounds or 39 years old?
    1 point
  38. I'm completing a grandfather clock made entirely of cherry. I experimented using a Lye solution (3 parts crystalized lye/one cup distilled water) to create a seasoned finish (looks something like Rosewood). I'm trying to decide what to apply as a finish. Typically, I French polish my pieces; however, this piece is so large that I don't want to use this technique. I'm trying to attain a high gloss finish and I'm not sure what to use ( poly, lacquer etc). I would appreciate your suggestions?
    1 point
  39. I've been repairing a lot of walnut imperfections like in your pic, with epoxy and brown dye. Matches very well. Also try to save some walnut sanding dust from your random orbital sander, and mix that in with clear epoxy. That works, too. Don't forget to cut all the rotten, or soft wood, out. I use different shaped picks.
    1 point
  40. I haven’t. I bought a few packs of them from Woodcraft when they had them on sale and haven’t worried about reusing them. If you use the proper solvent for the finish in the bag to flush them out, then let them dry out, it’ll probably be fine.
    1 point
  41. I wish that I had known that you had experience using lye because I made plenty of mistakes using it. Do you have any advice removing glue spots? When I use it in the future, I'm planning to spritz it with water before applying the lye; do you agree?
    1 point
  42. @Coop, if you are willing to play 'mad scientist', I've used lye on walnut before, which darkens it considerably. If you choose to experiment, I suggest multiple applications of a weak lye solution, sanding as if you had raised the grain each time. A single application of strong solution can go realy dark, really fast. And don't forget to neutralize the lye with a vinegar wash, or it will affect the top coat.
    1 point
  43. Ronn, do you know who does all his sawing? There is a guy in Cambridge that has a sawmill...just to produce lumber for woodworkers. He does mostly slabs, but I think he'll saw lumber for individuals, too. I've been lucky, I've used a guy in Isanti for the last 4 years, and he cuts the lumber exactly how I want it. I'm pretty sure I have a lifetime supply of walnut, white oak, and red oak stickered, stacked, and drying. Well...dry. But, I still want to cut up one more big white oak off of Dad's farm. Just in case...lol
    1 point
  44. ...you got a beautiful shop and she got a pig?
    1 point
  45. Can't speak to the product but the owner is apparently a gigantic piece of work.
    1 point
  46. I went floating with a rod in hand.
    1 point
  47. This is an iPhone response. My computer internet is down. I got the bike late afternoon. I started charging an empty battery. By darkness the battery was still charging. So I dont know how long yet. But I will let you know when I know. Amperage is a big factor and the charger itself could make the biggest difference. I agree with Tpt. Also you have a lot more weight because of the battery and motor add a bunch. But you have power. Mine has 6 settings including zero. Zero is a good setting if you are walking the bike. And/or a throttle. With cruise control. A lot different than a regular bike. I will have more to say when my internet is up. Xfinity is coming tomorrow morning. I hope they fix it. first iPhone post.
    1 point
  48. I'll add to Chestnut's post that I have a Makita 1/4 sheet orbital sander that I clamp a piece of non-woven pad to for cleaning and homogenizing the appearance of cast iron. I have a spray bottle of mineral spirits that I keep around the shop for various things. a few squirts and a ride with the 'sander', wipe down well, and wax. Here's my old hybrid after three years of hard use. And my current saw after years of use AND years of storage. Same treatment protocol. A cast iron top is going to get scratched, dinged and so forth. Rust is another matter. I stop what I'm doing and treat noticed rust problems right away. The current exception is a lot of stuff brought up from dad's. He lived 6 miles from the pacific ocean and salt water is a worthy enemy . I'll catch up eventually.
    1 point
  49. I'll get a video taken. edited to add: My BIL was a big boat sailor. I asked him if he had a spare rope clutch laying around. He said he might. You can release a line under load with a flip of a lever using one of them-a Lot more load than a few hundred pounds. A somewhat more powerful one than this, but similar idea:
    1 point
  50. I wanted wooden screws and a few years ago I bought the Acer-Ferrous Toolworks set (two screws, two nuts) from either Red Rose Reproductions or Highland Woodworking. I've been very pleased with the quality. Think I paid $89 plus shipping.
    1 point