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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/11/22 in Posts

  1. Picked up some really nice canary wood recently and here are a couple of candle holders turned from one piece of each plank. Finish so far is just a couple of applications of clear stain. Not sure what topcoat I'll use on them. Red streaked one, about 5" diameter yellow one, about 3.5" diameter
    12 points
  2. Just sharing for the fun of it. I love it when a hand-me-down tool comes with a story. I was using these today and realized my uncle had given them to me 50 years ago. He ended his career designing and making prototypes for jet fighter seats. These hung from his belt for cutting leather and naugahyde. He also entered a seat design for Disneyland's Monorail but, didn't make the cut . . . pun intended. I have used these for decades. They currently hang just inside one of the swing-out doors of my wall mounted tool cabinet.
    7 points
  3. This evenings saw dust creation.
    6 points
  4. I don't know that it matters but I misspoke when I said the tray was maple and walnut. This one is all walnut, it just happened to be some sappy walnut. The other trays have maple parts and I got corn-fused. The cut offs from resawing the scraps to thickness will give me some thin stock for tray supports. Bonus, the figure matches. I had pre-finished the insides of the boxes so these supports get glued in with some E6000. And you end up here. I normally use felt pads but for the shop I added these rubber bumpers as feet. This guy will set by the door and hold my shop specs. I think I have beat this topic to death but I'll circle back and post the other three boxes when they are complete.
    6 points
  5. You would think I was doing the restoration on Notre Dame with the amount of pics and posts on this project. I am getting older and slower so this helps me feel like I am making headway . The maple box is only finished with shellac so it is done quicker than the others. Here's my method for attaching this type of pull; a surface adhesive method. I apply some tape, choose the position, and trace part of the shape as a reference. I snip a couple of small bits of copper wire (small dowels or whatever will work), drill receiver holes for them and tap them in. The sharp tips left from being snipped with dykes act like dowel centers. I press the pull onto the spikes and this marks the locations for the holes on the pull for me. A bit of tape in case of squeeze out, a bit of epoxy, and a clamp. I've failed to remember to refresh my ZCI "the next time I use epoxy" a few times now. Finally remembered and mixed a bit more than I needed, laid a strip of packing tape on the surface, flipped the ZCI over, and drizzled epoxy into the slot to restore it. I plan to keep the smaller box and use it to store my Rx shop glasses and other small paraphernalia. I built a little tray to hold the glasses on top. This is just a rabbeted maple box with a rabbeted bottom to accept a walnut panel. With this thin stock I chose to round the corners of the panel rather than chisel the corners of the rabbets square. Ta-da. A little glue and a gravity clamp.
    6 points
  6. This comes up so often I thought I would post (probably again, sorry) how I do this. The felt pen labeled block of wood is what I used to use to hold a mill file at 90 degrees to mill the scraper's edges. It is just a milled scrap of ash. The extra slot at the far end is meaningless. It just happened to be in the piece of scrap when I chose it. I got a Veritas file holder somewhere along the way and it is pretty idiot proof for straight edges. The other block of wood just helps me keep the card perpendicular to the stone when stoning the edges. I start by removing any remaining hook by stoning the faces near the edges, both sides, all edges. I then mill each edge. Normally I hold the scraper and the file in my hands but, I have to hold the camera As mentioned I use the block of wood, any milled scrap will do, to help me consistently stone the edges on a coarse stone (about 200 grit) and then a fine (about 600 grit). What I am after is a smooth even "face" for the full length of the edge. I then pull the edges with a burnishing rod. The Veritas tri-burnisher has become my go-to. It really excels at curved scrapers but is good overall. For hooking straight edges the Veritas (what is this!?! a Lee Valley ad???) burnisher is another idiot-proof helper. A burnishing rod will do fine too. I do a 5 to 10 degree hook for a couple of passes. Over working the hook step causes a lot of folks issues I think. After the few-minute process your card scraper does this. All the Veritas items are just helpers. I got along fine before I had them.
    5 points
  7. Got a few more segments of wall panelling up, and got this thing installed. Had a bit of a fight with the exterior panelling. It's that garbage fiber-board t1-11, so there was no good way to pull off a whole panel without destroying it. I settled for scoring it out a few inches (wide enough for the sealing tape) from the window frame using a circular saw and chipping it out so as not to damage the housewrap underneath. Other than that it went in pretty smoothly. Still need to finish the drip edge and trim out both sides.
    5 points
  8. I made myself an espresso tamper a couple years ago, but the original walnut handle I made broke off not long after. I set it aside planning to fix it in a day or two... Fast forward about 14 months and I finally got around to turning a new handle. About as simple a project as they get, but eminently satisying nonetheless. Especially since I'll be using this thing 2-3 times a day. Just a simple chunk of curly maple epoxied to the existing tamper base. The base is made out of some old brass roundstock I inherited from my grandfather and had laying around. It's a bit dinged up from clamping it back into the jaws of my chuck, but I didn't have a great way to clean up the sides afterwards.
    5 points
  9. Now all you need is some glue, a press, and Formica(tm)!
    4 points
  10. Good info, thanks! I picked one up, remembering your tip for keeping a router bit from rolling around in the drawer.
    4 points
  11. Still having fun chasing flappers.
    4 points
  12. Spent most of the weekend catching up on yard work that I had been putting off. The weather was hot but the wind had finally stopped blowing for one weekend and was able to have the fire pit rolling all weekend. Finished up my first crack at a jointers mallet and got the first coat of Danish oil applied. Not sure I 100% like the shape and need to work on my shaping skills but overall I am pleased for my first one. It was hard to find any plans or dimensions for a mallet if anyone has a good resource or two for a future build.
    4 points
  13. So my method for unlaoding is tie to stationary object. And then drive away. I took some pictures loading. I don't have a Fancy log arch so i have to manage a different way. First is to lift the big end and prop the log up. This is dangerous. I use a block of wood with a notch and a high lift jack to accomplish this. Then i back the trailer under the propped log. i usually just use a log section to prop the end up in the air. Then i use a come along? Come-a-long? ... A cable hand winch to pull it on the trailer. So far with this method I've managed a 30" diameter 10' long log. By my guess that is about an 2500 lb log.
    4 points
  14. If I didn't have 3,000 hours seat time on that tractor, I'd probably be afraid to put it in there. It doesn't help that those toolboxes keep multiplying. I dug footings for an addition on the side of that building a few years ago, but then we bought the rental house, and I laid off my help to work by myself through the Pandemic, then my Mother moved in with us........ I knew I'd be busy doing other stuff, so filled them back in with the tractor so I could keep the grass cut. It's 24x40. The plan is to add 24 feet down one side, and 20 feet across the back. Maybe next Spring.....
    4 points
  15. The SCT (surface conditioning tool) came a while back, but I'm still waiting for some of the drums that it uses. Today, a wire brush came. It makes relatively quick work of cleaning up the old, rusty steel. I just played with it a little to see what it would do, but will drag out the supplied air when I do the whole thing. The thing I don't like about the SCT is that it throws the stuff back at you. It also does a fine job of weathering Cypress and Yellow Pine like I need for replacement parts on old houses. I'll paint this base since I can clean it up before I set the bandsaw on it. The bases for the front fixed casters are a little too large for the 5" angle iron. I just cut off the extra with the horizontal bandsaw, and will tack weld the fronts in place.
    4 points
  16. The floating tops and bottoms are pre-finished. They are also contrasting material so I tape them off. The insides are also pre-finished which makes handling easier. I add a couple of coats of a colored oil varnish blend. This is fairly thin and gets flooded, flooded again, and the wiped off. I have a bucket with a few inches of water in it that stands around when I am using hand applied oil based finishes. As I am done with a rag, pad, or a paper towel I just toss them in the water. This keeps oil based materials off the floor and prevents wads of applicators bursting into flames if I go inside for a cup of coffee The lid secures which is a nice feature. The maple box that is undersized (available scrap drove the sizing) may end up as my Rx safety glasses box near the door. I will make a little tray for it and add the pull. I am trying to get better at changing from my street glasses to my shop glasses, using my apron, and so forth. Having things handy will help with this . . . I hope.
    4 points
  17. Coop over 20" you going to see maybe 1/128" or roughly 0.01" of differential movement between walnut and ash. I'd say screws would probably be good enough. When in doubt use a bigger screw hole or elongate them but your probably fine. That's also assuming you have a decent amount of humidity change between seasons which I'm not sure you do.
    3 points
  18. With the lifting ring, I set the mower up on the big flat back end with the tractor loader. I back the tractor up a little bit and lower the bucket in place as a safety. That way I can change the blades without even bending over. Clean cardboard keeps from scratching the rear powder coating. I thought to turn the gas valves off, but one cap was not tight, so it leaked a little. Tightening the cap stopped the leak. I probably won't forget that again. I take the blades off with an impact wrench, but put them on with a regular wrench. If I can't run a nut all the way on easily by hand, I run a die on those threads. If the nut still won't run on easily, I toss that nut, and put on a new one. I don't know exactly what happens to the nuts, but I've always had that trouble with any mower blade nuts on any mower.
    3 points
  19. I like to apply shellac (Zinsler Universal Sanding sealer) to the bear wood and then sand lightly with 400 Grit. Most times I appy 2 coats and sand each coat. Then apply whatever finish I want. The shellac dries fast so I can put on the 2 coats, sand and apply the first finish coat in the same day. With the shellac I find that I can apply 1 less coat of the final finish because the wood is already sealed. Also, the shellac will help with the contrast (pop) of the grain. Waterborne finishes don't do that so well.
    3 points
  20. I just finished reading Dad's latest book. 'The Man from Golddust', a fictional story set in the time of the great 1937 flood that wiped out thousands of households from Illinois to Mississippi. He included a lot of details from his family's personal experience in that event, although it took place a year before he was born. A blend of spy thriller and coming of age story, pretty entertaining read.
    3 points
  21. I'm a bit luckier than most. I'm 75% deaf and wear two hearing aids. When I'm doing anything with loud noise, I just turn them off, and they act like plugs. I hope you never have to go through it. But the aids are hearing savers.
    3 points
  22. I added a bit of important information above. Wood cresote is what makes smoked meats have delicious flavors. The heavy metals and other compounds found in coal-tar creosote is what makes utility poles undesirable to have any where near a shop. There are also reports of cresote being a strong skin irritant, so prolong contact with it could cause rashes and discomfort.
    3 points
  23. I need to look all of that up but, I’m pretty sure I’m on the same routine.
    3 points
  24. While I'm on mobile bases, I stuck another version on the little horizontal bandsaw I've been using for cutting the pieces. It had a couple of plastic wheels in a bent sheetmetal contraption on the legs under the motor. There is a fold down handle on the other end. The design asked you to pick it up with the handle, but the wheels were too far off the floor. There were several other problems with the stock arrangement. The wheels put the motor behind them, and were high enough that it was more trouble keeping the whole thing from tipping over than it was to move it. Anyway, the flimsy legs are not so flimsy now, and it's very easy to move and maneuver it with one hand. Still waiting for the piece of metal for the bandsaw to get here.
    3 points
  25. I think I’d better stick with what I do best, lag bolts!
    3 points
  26. I planed all the pieces down to 2" after lunch. I'll decide later exactly how thick I want them. 2" looks too thick. I think 1-7/8 is too thick too, but I want them thick enough to remain stable. This is the first model of lunchbox planer that Delta came out with. I think I bought it in 1993. It has a terrible reputation for snipe, but all you have to do is hold up on the board going in, and coming out. 2008 is the last time I remember using this one. It was the only one I could set up quickly, and good enough for this job. I remember putting new knives in it the last time I used it, and they're still really good. The wind was blowing in the right direction to keep dust out of the building.
    2 points
  27. This is a great method but it depends on the ideal outcome. On all white maple even the seal coat of shellac can leave some yellowing. Coop when doing WB poly i almost always raise the grain and sand smooth. The finish goes on so fast that even with this extra step i'm still done finishing days before I would have been using an OB poly.
    2 points
  28. He has a few self-published works. Something he got serious about after 'retiring' from his career as a commercial illustrator. An 80+ year lifespan provides a surprising number of life experiences to draw stories from. You can look up ISBN 1387933159 for info on the latest one, if you are interested.
    2 points
  29. It's my first one. I've got the 2500lb butt log too. I air dry everything . Badly . I might try banding on these. Weird. My image uploaded upside down. The gum on my pair of 6 x 16 x 12' pine benchtops, on sawhorses that claim 1600 libs each
    2 points
  30. They look great. As you say it was nice wood, but your form really brings it out.
    2 points
  31. Yes and Yes. I have a Stihl MS661 with a granberg mill.
    2 points
  32. I’ve worked decades in a noise hazard environment (aircraft maintenance) and I always used the foamy 3M EAR plugs. Put them in first thing and wore them all day. I continue that practice in the shop or while doing any other loud activities like mowing the lawn. Plugs are light and aren’t sweaty in the summer.
    2 points
  33. I've used General Finishes High Performance with good, non-yellow results. Water-borne finish certainly has different working properties for application, but it seems to be quite durable.
    2 points
  34. Great story @gee-dub and glad to hear you’re using them again, I’m with @BonPacific, I have some of my father’s and grandfather’s tools and use one of them on every project even when I don’t have to just to have them in my hands
    2 points
  35. Thanks for the input - agreed its tough to gauge value. I usually price out based on eBay searches, but I couldn’t really find anything comparable right now. Saw some LN smoothing planes, etc. but not super helpful in helping me determine current value. Side note - I noticed you replied to one of my first project posts back in the day! Great to see you’re still on here! Funny enough, I divorced (that’s not the funny part, lol) about 3 years ago and that bunk bed project was one of only a handful of things I took with me. I never placed much sentimental value on objects but put way too much love into that to not take it with me.
    2 points
  36. There have actually been 6 different chemicals that are historically used to treat utility poles. Often the treatment varies by region. Either it's coal-tar creosote, PCP, CCA, or others it's best to avoid all use of the wood for any object that will have regular human contact. If you are referencing my post above, I was attempting to make it clear that there is a significant difference between Creosote generated from the combustion of coal, and the creosote that is generated from the combustion of wood. I was just trying to highlight that some terms can be misleading, like saying chemicals are harmful. The proper disposal for anything that has been treated with coal-tar creosote is a landfill certified for it's disposal. I would advise against using it in your yard for any reason, I wouldn't allow it into any dwelling I own (garage, shed or lean-to). I definitely wouldn't burn it.
    2 points
  37. Last minute update. I just spoke to my wife’s nephew who is a whiz at electronics, not knowing if he had a camera or alarm system. He has been using Vivint for 4.5 years and has no qualms with their service or equipment. And even though he has had a “soft” contract with them for that long, my monthly cost is just $11 more than his. I think that will be the route I go. Down side is one more darn app on my phone!
    2 points
  38. Personally, I don’t really see the value in them. Maybe I’m more fortunate than I realize to live in the area where I live. Though I also didn’t want them in SoCal or in Norfolk. Maybe I’m just naïve. The only cameras I have up are for wildlife and to see the water temp in my water stove. I would say that if you’re going to get cameras, get the best quality cameras you can afford. I used to frequent a photography forum and there were constantly guests posting “my security camera caught this car on my property but I can’t read the license plate, can you enhance this screenshot?” Lighting is important and camera placement is critical. Having the camera up high on the corner of the house sees a large area and avoids tampering, but has a low chance of getting a clear view of someone’s face, and therefore not much value in trying to catch potential criminals.
    2 points
  39. I have to keep this brief (it's a busy day today). I have Arlo, but I doubt the other products of this nature are any better. Limited to no operating instructions Two of the 5 cameras keep loosing their connection to the WiFi and reconnecting requires removing the camera from the mount (i.e. ladder) or removing the doorbell. The doorbell goes out for months at a time then spontaneously connects again and works for weeks, then off line, then on line. When the doorbell camera is off line the doorbell itself will not ring. On one camera the motion detector no longer works properly. Customer service hasn't been excellent. The heavy Philippine accent does not help the cause. There is no possibility of having a technician provide service, and there's no store front to take the product to for help. I do not like that the system is cell phone based, nor that it is tied to one cell phone as master. You can get the pictures on a computer, but you can only manage the system on one phone. There is a monthly fee ($10), otherwise you don't get recording. At least with ADT, or similar, you do get access to technical help. If you are installing surveillance cameras (especially with a motion detector), do the install in late spring or summer when the foliage is full, otherwise your cameras will have a great view of the trees. Don't ask how I know. If you have the system set to notify you when a camera is triggered and you live anywhere there are cars or people walking dogs, or there is wind, you could have several hundred notifications a day. So you'll be wanting to figure out how to turn these off. These are just my experience and opinions.
    2 points
  40. I'm going through the research phase for the same thing right now. I want wired cameras both for security of the signal (harder to jam) and for not having to charge batteries. So many review sites just copy and paste the marketing blurbs from the manufacturers and then seemingly arbitrarily give them ratings. The most informative reviews I've found are from The Hook Up YouTube channel . The guy really seams to know his stuff and his testing methods are solid. I'm leaning toward a Reolink system with an NVR that records locally, but can also be accessed from a PC or mobile device. I don't believe there is any of the video that is recorded on the cloud. It is at the economy end of the scale, but he rates it as being a great value. I expect to pay between $750 and $850 for a package that has an NVR and 4 4K cameras, depending on which cameras I choose. Because it's wired, installation is a lot more work, but being an electrician, I've got lots of experience at getting cables just about anywhere with minimal damage.
    2 points
  41. This is still a thing? I've always heard good things about Ubiquiti Unifi products. A good friend of mine uses them for hotels and commercial applications though so they are a bit more complicated. He is very security and privacy minded and I believe most of their products can be set up to run on a standalone network that doesn't have internet access.... The big benefit is almost all of their cameras run on power over Ethernet, this allows you to run 1 cored, cat 6, instead of needing to supply separate power.
    2 points
  42. Very well done. I would probably put it to better use as a beer tap!
    2 points
  43. Nut, I just zoomed in on your sketch and saw the magenta lines. As I will be doing dados on the underside of the sub-top for the vertical dividers, I think it will be just easier to make it solid wood, especially after yours and Matt’s advice of using screws to attach it to the top. Thanks!
    2 points
  44. I just finished watching Matt’s sofa table build and I am now a fan of his! Great presentation! I picked up some darn good ideas.
    2 points
  45. They tend to stay in the bucket for a few days while I am finishing. When done I do lay them out in the dirt to dry and then throw them away. The bucket just gives me an easy, safe place for waste until I finish the process. A nine drawer dresser can go through a lot of waste with the flood/wipe, oil/varnish blend method. For these little boxes it is not necessary as much as it is a habit
    2 points
  46. All the more reason stain just makes life difficult. If you want wood that looks like walnut use walnut. If you want perfect even color use paint, or spray dye with an HVLP. If perfect wood grain is desired find some printed laminate material. Hand application of stains is going to require some acceptance of the natural variation of wood, there just isn't any way around it.
    2 points
  47. The welding was the quick part. A 5 year old child can move the drill press now. It's very stable. My priorities were easy to move, close to the floor-actually raised only 3/4", and stable. All required points well fulfilled. I put the swivel casters with locks on the back, so they wouldn't be sticking out in the way of feet. All you have to do is activate one of the locks to stabilize it, so it doesn't matter if one locking lever is up under the back angle. This one is made from 5x5x1/4 and 3x3x1/4 angle iron, and a leftover scrap of 1/2" plate. It doesn't flex. Fasteners were left over from a past boat business. All I bought was the set of casters, and a few feet of MIG wire. I thought I'd made it too small. It rubbed going down into the base, but it did go all the way down. It's more steady than it was just sitting on it's own base. These are 4" casters. The bandsaw with get 6" ones. I was able to wrangle the big bandsaw out where I hope to glue that one together tomorrow. This is a Powermatic 1150 that I use in the mechanic/metal shop. It would look out of place if I had painted it anyway. I only care that the holes it drills are pretty. It would make a good start for a base with a cabinet on it, but the to-do list is beyond manageable anyway. I need this and the big bandsaw to make handrails for the rental house, so I decided to go ahead and build these. I'm having to squeeze time in to work on these as it is. I park the tractor with loader and mower on the back in there. When I work on something, I have to back the tractor out, and move stuff around like a slide puzzle. This will make the pieces easier to move out, and put back.
    2 points