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  1. For the sake of transparency . . . So, your branding iron gets bumped off the little holder and you are so focused on what you are doing that you don't notice. You are now so pleased with yourself for having done what you were doing that you run off to show the wife in the house. You return to the shop after chatting up SWMBO, making a cup of coffee, and generally goofing off. I smell SMOKE!!! Sorry I didn't get a pic without the template in place. Route out the bad, cut an inlay to match . . . Fettle the fit a little. Lay in some glue and drive it near flush (I scaled the patch to be a bit proud). Card scrape it flush. After a bit of finish it should . . . . . . be a big fat constant reminder for me to stay focused on safety!!!
    12 points
  2. Not up to my usual journal-type posts but, I am still just getting warmed up after a 2 year hiatus . One of these goes to a neighbor who just had a birthday. The other two will find homes during Christmas I bet. Below order, left to right is Peruvian Walnut, Black Walnut and Sapele. The inner frame on the left is Curly Maple. The other two are Tiger Maple. Finish is a Transtint Medium Brown wash on the outer frames and ARS as a topcoat on everything.
    10 points
  3. Over 92% of people in this country are vaccinated for Polio. If 92% were vaccinated for Covid, that would not be a worry either. As long as only about half are vaccinated, it will be with us, and no telling how many different mutations we'll see. No vaccine is 100% effective, and they don't need to be.
    7 points
  4. A funny thing happened a few years ago. We had some property in east Texas and there was a vendor that set up on the highway, selling Mayhaw jelly for $20 a pint. Best jelly in the world, JMO. We invited a couple up for the weekend and I fixed breakfast with homemade biscuits and this jelly. The male member of the couple proceeded to load his biscuits with all of my jelly. A couple of months later, I found a Mayhaw tree, planted it and made my own jelly! Never invited him back for breakfast!
    7 points
  5. Thank all. I spent many years in barely adequate shops. I did all those things we do to fit more stuff in a small space and it was great. The wife and I have had a goal for nearly 20 years and the new shop was part of that. With no intention of boasting or feeling full of myself I have to say that EVERY time I can walk from one area in the shop to another without sashaying around a jutting jointer table or performing some sort of choreographed maneuver to avoid barking my shins on a tool stand leg . . . I do feel giddy, I do want to pinch myself, and it really is a dream come true . Some folks retire and tour Europe, buy a boat, a vacation home, or a pair of Harley's . . . I bought a shop .
    7 points
  6. Finally installed. Net fit wall to wall is always demanding. Plus it was up 2 flights of stairs. Elevator not operating. Tools alone wore me out up and down the stairs. I love walnut. I was not the installer, I was the helper. The man is an expert and knows all the tricks. He makes my work look better. Inexpensive materials installed well looks better than expensive materials installed poorly. This job has both. I only work full days when installing. Especially with this installer. Him and the owner have no interest in 2 or 3 hours a day. So this is when I put in a full day. If this becomes well decorated by the homeowner and I get to see it I will take some more pictures. The man of this office has a lot of sports memorabilia . PS. The bottom drawer almost was a problem. I'm told much too late that the base boards are 10". The bottom drawer has just enough clearance to not be a problem. This is a high price construction. An arcatect should have been employed to avoid miscues like that. But I'd rather be lucky than good... sometimes.
    7 points
  7. Hijacking someone else’s thread again but hopefully @Chet won’t mind. The original shipping box for my miter box and saw was about 4”x12” x 2” high. I figured as small as it was, there was a possibility that in my shop, it could get damaged or greater still, lost. So I decided to build it a new home.
    7 points
  8. The other table. Now I can hook them together for large assemblies or use them separately.
    6 points
  9. A small piece of spalted elm was the intended piece. It was thick enough that I resawed it to hopefully get the continuous grain wrap. As my piece was not very wide, the box was not going to be as large as the eventual one. After using my small parts sled designed with the 90* cut on one end and a 45* on the other end, I used your idea of using the removable stop block that you showed in one of your post. The design was to be like a small pencil box with a sliding lid.After making all of the cuts and grooves, a dry fit revealed that I used my id dimensions as my od dimensions and the box was 1” too short and 1” too narrow, due to the 1/2” thickness of the board pieces. As it was too long to make a pencil box, I cut the sides down which left me with grain match on only two corners. Now I have a sliding lid pencil box!
    6 points
  10. Pam, my Mother, and I got our booster shots yesterday. A little arm soreness this morning, but that's it. Two more of our neighbors died from Covid in the past couple of weeks. Both were unvaccinated, but otherwise seemed in pretty good shape, and not even overweight like so many who have passed have been. No one I know who has been vaccinated has had any illness. I don't know of any that have had immune system problems, so the vaccines can work for them.
    5 points
  11. I went with retrofit cans. I climbed into the attic yesterday after work with a shovel and moved all the insulation away from the area. Once I had a good picture of the attic in the area doing retrofit cans just seemed obvious. So I ran to the store bought what I needed. I bought one of the recessed light hole saws and was going to use Tom's method. The hole saw was too small. Apparently the retrofit kits are not the same size as the new construction ones and there is no way the can would mount in the hole. So i grabbed my drywall rotozip thing, and used the templates that came with the cans. This meant that I ended up making a massive mess. This was only after cutting 1 hole so it got worse from there. Started at 6pm, had the 4 cans installed by 7pm. I got super lucky in that the ceiling hadn't been painted and whom ever hung the florescent fixture didn't damage the ceiling. You can't even tell there was a fixture there. Cans were wired and lights were in by 8pm. Cleaning was suspended at 9pm, because it was taking too long and Megan wanted to finish our show. Cleaning is easily going to take longer than all the other tasks put together.... On the bright side I can finally mount the cabinet door to the right in the picture above. This all got started because the door hit the old light fixture. 4 cans is about 0.5 cans too many. It's bright in the room and it's awesome.
    5 points
  12. I was going to post a few tidbits of this project in the "What’s On Your Workbench” thread, but then I got to thinking that maybe I should take a chance and do a real journal. Unlike some of my previous journals this won’t be done after the fact, when I already know the project has succeeded, but rather it will be done prospectively. I tried this for my first journal some time back and unfortunately that project went to poop. Hopefully I have enough “street cred” on this forum to weather the embarrassment if this one goes to poop, as well. I am taking pains to say this as I think this will be the most difficult project I have undertaken so far. So no promises. There are a lot of points in the process where poop could just come to be. I haven't named the piece yet so the title, 4 Duet De v9.0, is just the file name in my computer. If it all works out I'll come back and edit the title. Here’s what I am proposing to make: The basin is walnut and the base is butternut; I’m hoping, once finished, that combination will have just the right level of contrast and coordination. The basin is similar to basins I have made before, so I will use a similar approach, including making the pointy part. But the deep overhanging rim will be a bit of a challenge. I am thinking of it as a wide mouthed hollow form, but I’ve only done a couple of hollow forms, so…. At least I will be able to see what’s going on inside. The base has some entirely new problems to solve. With my prior convolved pieces there was a connecting ring of wood at the very bottom of the piece that was available to create a mounting point, and even if the final form did not include an integral basin there was at least a temporary ring of wood at the top helping to hold everything together. Because the shape of the walls on this piece is externally concave rather than the convex shape of previous pieces, the single ring of wood that will hold it all together is in the mid section. This project actually began early in October when I started to look back on some thumbnail sketches I had done earlier exploring ideas for another “duet” piece. The design I previewed above is the final choice after spending my hobby time designing and re-designing this piece over several weeks. It’s difficult to actually count up the number of different versions I have drawn and considered before settling on this form, but it’s easily over two dozen. These includes bases similar to my previous pieces: And also, at the behest of some artists I have spoken with, at least one base with three pillars instead of four, which as you can see suffers from “plumber’s butt”. Well, the good news is that with all the designing, I’m getting better with Fusion 360. After the design phase I needed to figure out how I would make the piece, so I’ve spent my time the last couple of weeks engineering. The good news is I now see a pathway to make the project. Since, unlike a chair or dresser build, this is an unfamiliar process to most of you (even if you’ve seen my previous journals), I thought I would layout the broad strokes of my plan to make it easier if you choose to follow this journal. And it gives me a chance to show off some Fusion 360 mojo. Starting with the squared up blank mounted via a screw chuck in the top face, the first step will be to turn the outside of the form. Then begin hollowing by removing the bottom half of the inside. I will use the outer wall contour as a guide to the shape of the inner walls. My target thickness is usually ¼”, but I will leave the wall thicker at the level of the connecting ring. Then I will glue the bottom of the base to a sacrificial block of poplar which is in turn mounted to a screw chuck. This allows the piece to be flipped on the lathe so that the base is now mounted to the spindle. The first chuck, which had been attached to the top face, can then be removed exposing the top face for hollowing out. Again the outer contour is the guide to shape and wall thickness is determined directly. With the inside and outside contours completed it will be time to cutback the sides to reveal the form. The piece is removed from the screw chuck and a template is attached to the bottom of the poplar block using the previous screw hole. Then through the magic of Fusion 360 the waste wood is removed and it will look like this (in theory). How that magic is actually going to happen is a matter of some debate in my head. I have two plans in mind. One is to use a bandsaw follower and the template, but that has had mixed performance in the past. The second idea is to carve away the waste wood with a Dremel. I may end up with some hybrid of the two; the jury is still out. After the cutback the edges get chamfered. And then the sacrificial block has to be removed. I plan to saw this off with a flush cut saw, and hope that the legs lengths are close enough that only a little sanding will be required. So that’s the plan as I’ve drawn it. Of course it remains to be seen if it survives first contact with the wood.
    4 points
  13. The name of this orchid is Brassia Edva Loo. A hybrid, both parents brassia. The flower is 18" top to bottom. It grows in the Americas. Tropical to sub tropical.
    4 points
  14. 4 points
  15. Good point about the Flu vaccine. I suspect there will soon be "seasonal" revisions to the COVID-19 series of vaccines as well, since it is mutating rapidly, same way influenza does. I recently listened to a "Stuff You Should Know" podcast that described, in layman's terms, how the mRNA vaccine for COVID-19 works, as compared to 'weakened virus' vaccines, like the polio vaccine Richard mentioned. Seems that the mRNA type informs the immune system by 'training' it, rather than weakly attacking it so that it figures things out by experience. Sort of like sending your immune system to boot camp, rather than dumping it on the edge of a battlefield. The result is far faster to produce and modify as needed, since it is created in a lab, not grown in a culture. Now, just as a reminder, politics and religion are verboten subjects. Let's take care to avoid letting a valid discussion stray into those areas, please.
    4 points
  16. Another quality jig from gee-dub. It looks like the design is meant to read a template mounted on top of the workpiece, which is the way it is more commonly done, I think. Because I'm cutting into a tall piece that won't sit well on the bandsaw table with a template on top I typically have the template under the workpiece. This is what I came up with: I usually use a 1/4" blade, but this 3/4" blade was what was on the bandsaw. The tip of the saw teeth are in middle of a 1/2" dowel, so 1/4" from the template surface, and the pin is about 1/2" proud of the plate. The plate is about as big as the BS table, to which it needs to be clamped. I will volunteer that my design is a qualified success. It can work well, but the problem is that the workpiece blocks your view of the template so it isn't immediately obvious that the cut has wandered off the line. And unfortunately it can wander towards or away from the template.
    4 points
  17. I was surprised that with all the router stuff I have around that I did not have a pair of medium sized router base plates with template profiles in them. I mostly do template routing with my plunge bases which I prefer teardrop bases on. I didn't realize that when it came to plain round bases with step openings I had . . . none!?! Pull some plexiglass out of the bin and cut off a piece. Then cut that piece in half because I need two bases. This bandsaw template jig was made for different saw so the clamping is a little kludgy; still works. Leave the commercial base taped on and flush trim the bandsawn blank. Use the commercial plates holes as a guide for the through holes for the screws. These holes are a bit oversized to allow precision centering (later) of the template collar. For the counter-bores, the screw head thickness is the depth guide. That is, I drill the counter-bore deep enough so that the screw head is recessed. Nearly there. I attach each plate to the base it will be used with. I use a router and a 1/4" bit to mark the approximate center. Now using this hole at the drill press as an alignment aid I can drill the stepped hole for the collar. That's just what I needed.
    4 points
  18. My experience with the Moderna shots was pretty similar to what I experience with the flu shot every year. By the way, I hope you all got the flu vaccine, too.
    4 points
  19. See fence in my previous post, before the tractor one. 10' steel T-posts, with some length cut off the top, pounded in the ground with a post pounder. The black mesh is some sort of plastic, 7' tall. It's solely for keeping deer out, and has not failed. No problems with "Gophers", called Ground Hogs here, so far. I have some special tools that throw lead projectiles at high speed, if needed.
    4 points
  20. A swan neck turning tool with some cutters and two wall thickness guages, both of which are way bigger than they looked in the catalog.
    4 points
  21. I got my booster the week before Thanksgiving, and felt pretty crappy the following day. My wife and son, just a little tired. Even so, I feel the protection is well worth the discomfort, especially if it helps me avoid SPREADING this stupid virus.
    4 points
  22. The bottom rail of the doors should be wider than the top rail. Better engineering. The previous picture of the above had the doors upside down which required left to be on right and right to be on left. And the blum hinge plates allowed the doors reversed. SO I went over there this morning and righted the wrong. I noticed this when looking at the pictures.
    4 points
  23. This afternoon, all three of us are feeling kind of slow. I was running chainsaws this morning, but decided to call it for this afternoon. It didn't help that its 71 degrees. I like running chainsaws when its cold. Well worth the little bit of inconvenience, knowing that our immune systems are getting good practice.
    4 points
  24. So recipie, this is close to what we used but we made a much larger batch. Our batch used 10 lbs of russet potatoes. Russet potatoes (6 medium), 1/4 cup butter, 1/4 cup milk, 1 tsp salt, 1 tsp sugar, 2 2/3 to 3 cups flour, extra flour for rolling, butter, sugar (white or brown) Potatoes are boiled until fork tender (the fork pieces the potato but they are still somewhat firm). Potatoes are riced, butter milk sugar salt are mixed and the mixture is cooled overnight. Following day mix flour by hand, chill again for an hour. Make 2" diameter balls, and flatten to hockey puck size. The smoother the edges of the puck the nicer the lefse will roll out. The uneven edges are from cracks. Lefse is rolled cold with a grooved or textured rolling pin on a pastry cloth. Both the cloth and the pin should have flour worked into the surface to prevent sticking. Refresh flour on the pin and pastry cloth after each piece rolled out. If using a pastry cloth you should be able to almost read the lettering through the lefse. So very thin. I didn't get pictures of this because i was the griddle operator and was busy. To move the lefse you slide the point of the turner under the center so the point extends out the other side and lift strait up. The griddle is 500F and it's best to not start making if the griddle is cooler than 450F. To place the lefse you set one of the hanging edges down and roll the turner laying the lefse flat. This is not like making pancakes. It only takes 30-90 seconds per side so don't get distracted. Once you see uniform bubbles your getting close to being done. I lift an edge with the turner to check for color. Keep a cotton towel on hand to wipe excess flour off the griddle after each piece. The cloth can also be used to move the lefse around on the griddle if you didn't hit the center as well as you hoped. We stack the cooked lefse on cloth to cool to room temperature before folding and packaging. Shelf life is a few days in the refridgerator, so if you want it to keep longer freeze it. Should be good 6 months-1year frozen.
    4 points
  25. Thanks Dave! The box was constructed from one of the last pieces I had from a cherry tree that I cut down in Louisiana about 5 years ago. The lid frame from the same tree, just more heart wood. The walnut lid panel, also the last of a walnut tree from the same trip to LA. Since the box side boards were not from a re-sawn piece, the grain skips a beat on the fourth corner, which I intentionally didn’t show. The box’s mitered corners were secured with blind splines with their mortises cut with a jig in the router table. Unfortunately, the finger grips for the lid did not turn out as I had hoped. With your advance advice, I used a router core box bit on my router table with stop blocks. I set the height of the bit against a scrap piece and adjusted the fence to nibble a small amount at a time. Yeah, it is time to buy a new quality bit. I ended up having to remove the burn marks with a chisel to the config shown. The finish was 2 coats of high gloss ARS and three coats of GF HP satin top coat, sanding the nibs with a 240 foamed backed paper between coats. After the last coat, I finished it to baby butt smooth with a small piece of brown paper bag.
    4 points
  26. This is my first ever project using Badog CNC machine, I believed it's a Swiss-made. My grandpa bought it when he was still alive and living his retirement in Switzerland. How do you find it? I hope it's great to you.
    3 points
  27. One more pedestal is next. For a client of a famous, local artist, Geoffrey Smith. Same wood. QSWO and curly QSWO for the panels. A little larger. I made the above a few years ago. One of the panels. I like to put at least one coat before fabricating. Get less finish in the frame. And I like to look at it after buffing it to 220. It is not quite as hard as end grain. I use a lot of discs on the RO. 80, 100, 150, 220. The curly deserves the attention. Doing these panels with just one face is so much quicker than when both sides are required. Then I need to use my drum sander. A small unit and it takes a long time. it needs to be at least 3/32nds thicker to sand after the planner beats up the curly. Now the inside which will never see light is very ugly.
    3 points
  28. Sure, I'll stand in and do your woodworking while you have a root canal.
    3 points
  29. The vaccine trains ones immune system to fight the virus, if it shows up in the system. If one has a poor immune system, or compromised by some complications, Colin Powell as an example, that immune system can't take advantage of the vaccine. You might get sick from the virus, if you're vaccinated, but with an already trained immune system, if you have a good one, you won't get very sick, and slim chance of getting sick enough to have to go in the hospital, and close to zero chance of dying. The vaccine cuts down on transmissibility by, at least, 40 to 60%. That's enough to make a difference all around. Of the about 1500 people who died yesterday, not one with a good immune system, who had been vaccinated, died. I forget the number, but of the vaccinated ones, compromised immune system or not, who died were in the single digits. I've done my part for not spreading this virus, and don't want to be around anyone who has not. Simple as that. It would have been over long ago, if everyone had done their part. The vaccines have been proven that they are effective. Only disinformation says that they aren't.
    3 points
  30. Not sure respect is my position on their decision. I don't want anyone near me that hasn't been vaccinated.
    3 points
  31. Follow up I ended up using North America Van Lines for my move. Equipment and wood arrived in good shape. I got a 30' x 40' x 12' stick built detached garage that I have slowly been turning into my new shop. 2x6 studs. Had one 120v outlet and minimal lighting. So far I have gotten wiring done, insulation consisting of 2" of foam and 4" cellulose in the walls, and 14" of blown insulation in the ceiling. and sheet rock hung. LP tank and furnace are in, minisplit will follow later. New lighting and ceiling fan will be done by me this week. Given the supply chain and worker shortage it has been a challenge, but I am pleased so far.
    3 points
  32. We're all feeling back to normal tonight. A few run down hours was a small price to pay.
    3 points
  33. The discomfort is just a reminder that your immune system and vaccine are doing their job!
    3 points
  34. I have the PC 12" dovetail jig and even though it is not "state of the art" , I like it. I made several drawers with half blinds with it, they came out nice.
    3 points
  35. Wow, that looks great! You aren't kidding about wall-to-wall fit, that is a bear to do well. Looks like your guy pulled it off, and I'm sure the accuracy of your build had nothing to do with it.
    3 points
  36. Another 'trick' that makes sawing the top loose a bit safer, is to set the cut depth a hair short of the wall thickness. That keeps the kerf from closing on the blade, and keeps the parts from shifting on the final pass. Then use a handsaw or even a razor knife to finish up. BTW, I have a 'valet' box that I made hold my EDC stuff at night. ALL the joints are glued miters, including the top and bottom. It also has walnut strips glued into dados across the grain to simulate leather straps. Breaks all the rules, but because it is only about 9"x7", no problem, after about 5 years.
    3 points
  37. Dear Santa - I have been a very good boy this year. For Christmas, could I please have one of those excavators that you let Tom play with? I'll be sure to leave extra cookies for you. Robby
    3 points
  38. I was usually looking out the window in my geometry class or at my teachers cleavage so I can’t help you mathematically. Actually, it looks to be greater than 1/4”. I’ve used one of these in the past from Office Depot. You can also place a straight edge along the two edges of the board and mark where the curve starts. Then take a small combo square and draw perpendicular lines at these points. The length of these lines at their intersection, should give you the diameter and half of that would be the radius. I really stepped out on thin limb by saying that!
    2 points
  39. Nothing! For the first time in... well... Anyways. Got the little shop cleaned up finally, in preparation for our upcoming move (and my new shop). Trying to keep my excitement tempered, but it's not really working.
    2 points
  40. I found an App called Skyview Lite for free. Its pretty good at telling you what you are looking at. I suspect you were looking at Jupiter.
    2 points
  41. Richard, I don’t think you understand how vaccines work. No vaccine can keep anything from attacking you. The vaccine trains your immune system to recognize the infection and quickly attack it. The infection has to be already in your system (and by definition attacking your cells), but often your immune system kills the infection before you feel much, if any, of the symptoms. Sometimes, however, an individual’s immune system won’t make the proper reaction to the vaccine and does not react quickly enough when they are exposed to the disease and the person gets sick. Other times, the virus mutates and and individual’s immune system does not recognize the mutated version as harmful, and therefore does not attack it soon enough to kill it before the person gets sick. The fact that you have never had polio has just as much to do with living in the USA as having the vaccine. Polio is nearly eradicated. There were only 140 reported cases in 2020. This comes from nearly 50 years of high vaccination rates. The early versions of the vaccine were only 50-60% effective. Now they are 99+% effective after all doses. The flu shot IS a vaccine. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/flushot.htm It is reformulated every year to target the strains of the flu virus that are expected, so the effectiveness fluctuates every year. As with EVERY vaccine, it is not 100% effective.
    2 points
  42. ShopNotes #116 is where I got the idea. I added a second "nose" with a narrower tip since I do a lot of inside curves. I used an old section of cold roll that I cleaned up for the vertical rods. I recommend at least 1/2" for these as they take the lion's share of the force that may allow weaker stock to flex during use. You do not want the tip straddling the blade to shift while in use . The dimensions are flexible to make it fit your saw. One important fit is that you end up with the base being where you can clamp down the jig without being in the way of the work. Here's a couple pics of mine on the saws it was originally designed for. You can see in the pics in the previous posts that it does not clamp as well to the Rikon 10" I now have. The 10" pictured above is an older Delta.
    2 points
  43. Packed them myself broke down all the equipment to smallest stable component myself. Trust only goes so far
    2 points
  44. I've been doing some prototyping for an upcoming project. These are my idea for the base for some end tables. The back is where the clamp is. I'm going to have a single brace from the cross piece to the front to support a box for the end table. I'm just checking the design for strength and flex before doing the real deal. My intent is to go with a modern design that appears to defy gravity. In my testing it's clear the rear cross brace will need to be a halflap. Currently it's M&T but there is too much twist. I also will add some sculpting and some tapers to these parts to add some flare. I've also been working on some shop upgrades which I'll post about later.
    2 points
  45. These 2 pieces will install in opposing corners. There is a slot milled to receive a desk top about 6'. There are 2 shelf units that set on top of the drawers. I have them clamped together for temporary stability. There will be 8/4 tops on each piece. Stepped down from the top of the shelves will be another shelf unit going across. Also topped with 8/4. Finish oil sealer semi gloss General. As I am typing this the hinges just came in the mail.
    2 points
  46. Finally got back to this after another stretch of days on service in the hospital and having family for Thanksgiving. This was my first attempt at making mortises, so I did a fair amount of practice before working on the actual workpiece. Marc’s new book was really helpful to me in setting this up and getting it cut. Laid out the mortises on both boards simultaneously to limit errors. The mortises are 1.5” deep, 3” long, and 1/2” wide. The center rails of the barn door will join into the stiles in these mortises. Only have a 1/4” spiral up cut, so had to take two passes. Feel like the result was acceptable for my first time and left just a small amount to be chiseled out to compete the mortises. Pretty happy overall, but would definitely take any tips you all have for the future.
    2 points
  47. When you and Coop are ready to do the cross-cultural culinary experiment of lefse and tomato gravy let me know. I'll be a volunteer taste tester.
    2 points
  48. Yeah, I have been noticing that about a lot of things. I have decided to use option 3 with less of a gap than in the sketch to minimize the visible end grain of the table top. Thanks, all.
    2 points
  49. It ain’t Woodworking but next best thing. We only get the flavored stuff here and not the real thing. Won’t mention his name but he is a member here. Totally unexpected. Thanks Dave!
    2 points