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  1. This table will end up in a spare bedroom to hold the desktop computer and printer, the top is 20 X 40 and it stands 32 high, all M&T joints pegged with walnut dowels, the top "floats" 3/8" up from the legs, zebra wood pulls that are screwed on and the heads covered with 3/8" square walnut pegs and the whole thing finished with 2 coats of shellac then 3 coats of ARS satin, i am particularly pleased with the grain match across the front apron/drawers, i think that came out real nice although non woodworkers would not notice, should have done a journal on this one but things in the shop are moving pretty fast and i had to knock this one out quick to get on to other projects. thanks for looking and as usual comments, questions and criticism are always welcome.
    12 points
  2. Picked up some really nice canary wood recently and here are a couple of candle holders turned from one piece of each plank. Finish so far is just a couple of applications of clear stain. Not sure what topcoat I'll use on them. Red streaked one, about 5" diameter yellow one, about 3.5" diameter
    12 points
  3. Just sharing for the fun of it. I love it when a hand-me-down tool comes with a story. I was using these today and realized my uncle had given them to me 50 years ago. He ended his career designing and making prototypes for jet fighter seats. These hung from his belt for cutting leather and naugahyde. He also entered a seat design for Disneyland's Monorail but, didn't make the cut . . . pun intended. I have used these for decades. They currently hang just inside one of the swing-out doors of my wall mounted tool cabinet.
    7 points
  4. This comes up so often I thought I would post (probably again, sorry) how I do this. The felt pen labeled block of wood is what I used to use to hold a mill file at 90 degrees to mill the scraper's edges. It is just a milled scrap of ash. The extra slot at the far end is meaningless. It just happened to be in the piece of scrap when I chose it. I got a Veritas file holder somewhere along the way and it is pretty idiot proof for straight edges. The other block of wood just helps me keep the card perpendicular to the stone when stoning the edges. I start by removing any remaining hook by stoning the faces near the edges, both sides, all edges. I then mill each edge. Normally I hold the scraper and the file in my hands but, I have to hold the camera As mentioned I use the block of wood, any milled scrap will do, to help me consistently stone the edges on a coarse stone (about 200 grit) and then a fine (about 600 grit). What I am after is a smooth even "face" for the full length of the edge. I then pull the edges with a burnishing rod. The Veritas tri-burnisher has become my go-to. It really excels at curved scrapers but is good overall. For hooking straight edges the Veritas (what is this!?! a Lee Valley ad???) burnisher is another idiot-proof helper. A burnishing rod will do fine too. I do a 5 to 10 degree hook for a couple of passes. Over working the hook step causes a lot of folks issues I think. After the few-minute process your card scraper does this. All the Veritas items are just helpers. I got along fine before I had them.
    6 points
  5. thanks Drew, the whole front apron/drawers were one piece of wood that had that nice grain in it, marked the board in several spots vertical so i would be sure to match them up correctly then ripped the top and bottom rails, top is 1" and bottom was 1 1/2", cut the center divider out its 1 1/2" wide, then used stops to cut out the drawers and end pieces, its close enough for a town this big, used the TS for the cuts so there is an 1/8" missing but not enough to notice, i will take your advice and try under mount next time, never done them before and it would have looked better if i had used them on this project and yeah that cross beam is a great spot to rest your feet and adds a good bit of strength to the piece, I've had friends that slowed down and it didn't turn out well for them so i think i'll just take a day off before starting the next project
    6 points
  6. This evenings saw dust creation.
    6 points
  7. Now all you need is some glue, a press, and Formica(tm)!
    5 points
  8. Good info, thanks! I picked one up, remembering your tip for keeping a router bit from rolling around in the drawer.
    5 points
  9. Got a few more segments of wall panelling up, and got this thing installed. Had a bit of a fight with the exterior panelling. It's that garbage fiber-board t1-11, so there was no good way to pull off a whole panel without destroying it. I settled for scoring it out a few inches (wide enough for the sealing tape) from the window frame using a circular saw and chipping it out so as not to damage the housewrap underneath. Other than that it went in pretty smoothly. Still need to finish the drip edge and trim out both sides.
    5 points
  10. I don't know that it matters but I misspoke when I said the tray was maple and walnut. This one is all walnut, it just happened to be some sappy walnut. The other trays have maple parts and I got corn-fused. The cut offs from resawing the scraps to thickness will give me some thin stock for tray supports. Bonus, the figure matches. I had pre-finished the insides of the boxes so these supports get glued in with some E6000. And you end up here. I normally use felt pads but for the shop I added these rubber bumpers as feet. This guy will set by the door and hold my shop specs. I think I have beat this topic to death but I'll circle back and post the other three boxes when they are complete.
    5 points
  11. It cleaned up with little trouble after being untouched for 15 years. I don't know what I would do without this tractor. Notice the reflection of the fence on the tables. This was made when they cared about cast iron quality.
    4 points
  12. Still having fun chasing flappers.
    4 points
  13. Spent most of the weekend catching up on yard work that I had been putting off. The weather was hot but the wind had finally stopped blowing for one weekend and was able to have the fire pit rolling all weekend. Finished up my first crack at a jointers mallet and got the first coat of Danish oil applied. Not sure I 100% like the shape and need to work on my shaping skills but overall I am pleased for my first one. It was hard to find any plans or dimensions for a mallet if anyone has a good resource or two for a future build.
    4 points
  14. So my method for unlaoding is tie to stationary object. And then drive away. I took some pictures loading. I don't have a Fancy log arch so i have to manage a different way. First is to lift the big end and prop the log up. This is dangerous. I use a block of wood with a notch and a high lift jack to accomplish this. Then i back the trailer under the propped log. i usually just use a log section to prop the end up in the air. Then i use a come along? Come-a-long? ... A cable hand winch to pull it on the trailer. So far with this method I've managed a 30" diameter 10' long log. By my guess that is about an 2500 lb log.
    4 points
  15. If I didn't have 3,000 hours seat time on that tractor, I'd probably be afraid to put it in there. It doesn't help that those toolboxes keep multiplying. I dug footings for an addition on the side of that building a few years ago, but then we bought the rental house, and I laid off my help to work by myself through the Pandemic, then my Mother moved in with us........ I knew I'd be busy doing other stuff, so filled them back in with the tractor so I could keep the grass cut. It's 24x40. The plan is to add 24 feet down one side, and 20 feet across the back. Maybe next Spring.....
    4 points
  16. Thanks @Coopand @Chet I like it but most of all the wife likes it I started with a piece of walnut almost 1 3/4” thick Coop and it finished to 1 1/2” square legs, I wish it would have been a little thicker piece but it’s what I had on hand, I also thought the apron/ drawers could have been less than what they are but I wanted the drawers to be big enough to hold my wife’s stuff
    3 points
  17. Still playing with logs. I ended up scoring one of the nice white oak logs I wanted. Loaded it the same way as the other logs but at 32"-34" on the big end and 32" x 28" on the small end it, my guess is that it weighs between 2,500lbs and 3,000 lbs. I tried to unload it my usual way but things didn't work out as planned. It turns out the log won this battle. I was able to use my ATV to pull it off the trailer otherwise I'd have been pretty stuck. My log yard is starting to fill up. Normally i wouldn't be self conscious about the chain saw noise but i have a decent pile here and it's goign to require many hours of sawing... I'm going to have to make some cutting boards or something to bribe my neighbors.
    3 points
  18. 1/16 is not going to give you much of a profile. You can almost get that with a sanding block and 150 sandpaper.
    3 points
  19. I planed all the pieces down to 2" after lunch. I'll decide later exactly how thick I want them. 2" looks too thick. I think 1-7/8 is too thick too, but I want them thick enough to remain stable. This is the first model of lunchbox planer that Delta came out with. I think I bought it in 1993. It has a terrible reputation for snipe, but all you have to do is hold up on the board going in, and coming out. 2008 is the last time I remember using this one. It was the only one I could set up quickly, and good enough for this job. I remember putting new knives in it the last time I used it, and they're still really good. The wind was blowing in the right direction to keep dust out of the building.
    3 points
  20. Coop over 20" you going to see maybe 1/128" or roughly 0.01" of differential movement between walnut and ash. I'd say screws would probably be good enough. When in doubt use a bigger screw hole or elongate them but your probably fine. That's also assuming you have a decent amount of humidity change between seasons which I'm not sure you do.
    3 points
  21. With the lifting ring, I set the mower up on the big flat back end with the tractor loader. I back the tractor up a little bit and lower the bucket in place as a safety. That way I can change the blades without even bending over. Clean cardboard keeps from scratching the rear powder coating. I thought to turn the gas valves off, but one cap was not tight, so it leaked a little. Tightening the cap stopped the leak. I probably won't forget that again. I take the blades off with an impact wrench, but put them on with a regular wrench. If I can't run a nut all the way on easily by hand, I run a die on those threads. If the nut still won't run on easily, I toss that nut, and put on a new one. I don't know exactly what happens to the nuts, but I've always had that trouble with any mower blade nuts on any mower.
    3 points
  22. I like to apply shellac (Zinsler Universal Sanding sealer) to the bear wood and then sand lightly with 400 Grit. Most times I appy 2 coats and sand each coat. Then apply whatever finish I want. The shellac dries fast so I can put on the 2 coats, sand and apply the first finish coat in the same day. With the shellac I find that I can apply 1 less coat of the final finish because the wood is already sealed. Also, the shellac will help with the contrast (pop) of the grain. Waterborne finishes don't do that so well.
    3 points
  23. I just finished reading Dad's latest book. 'The Man from Golddust', a fictional story set in the time of the great 1937 flood that wiped out thousands of households from Illinois to Mississippi. He included a lot of details from his family's personal experience in that event, although it took place a year before he was born. A blend of spy thriller and coming of age story, pretty entertaining read.
    3 points
  24. I'm a bit luckier than most. I'm 75% deaf and wear two hearing aids. When I'm doing anything with loud noise, I just turn them off, and they act like plugs. I hope you never have to go through it. But the aids are hearing savers.
    3 points
  25. Good catch Coop yes there is, not much of one I used a 1/4” shank panel raising bit I had to put a small bevel on it, the top is just shy of 7/8” to start and I thought the bevel would lighten up the look a bit
    2 points
  26. Beautiful piece, Dave! The front grain flow is a really nice touch. I've used that cut-out method before, and it works well. If the missing kerf will stand out against very distinct grain (oak, anyone?), then a 7.25" circular saw blade in the TS can reduce the kerf to nearly 1/16".
    2 points
  27. That is some real impressive work Dave. Perfect proportions if you ask me and Yea, that cross beam looks like a good place to rest your muddy boots.
    2 points
  28. A quick pass with a block plane is what I usually do. By the time finish sanding is done, it's slightly softened. I like the look of a very slight chamfer.
    2 points
  29. Normally, this would be considered a carpentry job, and not really woodworking, but this case calls in some woodworking. The porch on a house we're preparing to rent is not quite 3' off the ground, and never had any handrails. We don't want to rent it without that safety in place. We also don't want to cut any more of the view out, so we don't want any heavy parts. In the Summer of 2019 I bought some 4x6's for the process of saving a chimney that was collapsing on a 1798 house. When we pulled them down, I stacked them on stickers in a shed. They are as dry as they will get, and have lost over half the weight of pressure treated wood from a building supplier. I had exactly the number I needed to get the 1-7/8 x 2-3/4 pieces out of. I don't have anything else I can get them out of, and didn't really want to go looking for something that doesn't exist anywhere close to us. The bandsaw base was made for this job, so I could get it outside. I rolled it down the short ramp outside that building, and left it on the slant so gravity helped me keep them against the fence. I clamped a board near the width of the piece being run, but it was not really tight enough too push against the 4x's. It just kept anything from getting too far away from the fence. I ran the pieces to about 2-1/4 to get the 1-7/8's out of. I didn't set up roller stands, but just man handled them. Every piece had the pith in it, and the majority of the wood was juvenile wood. I really would not have bet any money that at least half of them would have gone completely haywire. Not a single piece did! Only one piece had any stress in it, and that not too much to keep me from using those two pieces that came out of it as the bottom rails for the floor to help hold the bow up. I'll get into the details as I build them. For today, I just ran all the rough pieces. I feel extremely lucky with this so far. The bandsaw was very easy to handle, but I couldn't roll it back up the ramp, so I pushed it back in the building with the tractor. A 24" bandsaw is almost a completely different machine than the more common 14"er's. It laid these 4x's open like it was no work at all. Balusters with be 1/2" round black aluminum, with as close to 4" open spaces as I can make them, keeping every space the same width.
    2 points
  30. I consider an edge break or easing to mean, "Get rid of the sharp edge". Sandpaper only.
    2 points
  31. My bad - I stopped scrolling before I got to the Flare Leg version. I think I'd stick with my estimate of 1-3/4 to 2" for the straight part of the legs. The flare looks to me to be a little less than half the width of the straight part. It might help to get a sheet of poster board and cut out some silhouettes to see what proportions look right.
    2 points
  32. I’ve gone to to their website WAY more than you can imagine. They probably think I’m a stalker If they are tracking! I have also gone to the manufacturer, Lyndon Furnitures site. They advertise it as it as a Flare Leg console so I don’t think it’s the pic distortion. I made this a few years back but the legs and flare, in this case upside down, don’t have enough meat for the size of the project.
    2 points
  33. They must be hiding witht he 2 packs of table 8's that I bought and can't find.
    2 points
  34. That's going to be a nice railing, Tom! Having done my deck railing with those black aluminum balusters, I can verify that they have minimal impact on the view. I used a story stick to mark my baluster spacing, with marks from the center outward. It seemed to be less noticable to have any deviation in spacing to occur on each side of the 4x posts, where the pattern is already interrupted. It sure made locating the rails go faster. Come to think of it, I made a video:
    2 points
  35. I have the IsoTunes, best hearing protection I’ve ever had and the sound is great ! Music, podcasts all clear as a bell, I won’t be without them ever again
    2 points
  36. Got back down to the shop in what feels like forever last night. Was nice to be back but I find myself moving slower. Taking pictures of the dust sensor isn't helping either. Tonight will be some sanding so another good test for that and then I'll put the results up in dust management topic. Rockler is having some website issues and a lot of their PDFs aren't working so I can't download the instructions for the bed rail brackets I ordered. They said they're hoping it will be up by tomorrow. If not I guess I'll have some experimenting to do.
    2 points
  37. The white of maple is the sap wood. So the darker wood is heart wood. Heart wood maple can be very pretty, it just requires a pretty large tree to get consistent heart wood. Maple trees typically have a lot of sap wood compared to species like walnut.
    2 points
  38. This is a great method but it depends on the ideal outcome. On all white maple even the seal coat of shellac can leave some yellowing. Coop when doing WB poly i almost always raise the grain and sand smooth. The finish goes on so fast that even with this extra step i'm still done finishing days before I would have been using an OB poly.
    2 points
  39. It's my first one. I've got the 2500lb butt log too. I air dry everything . Badly . I might try banding on these. Weird. My image uploaded upside down. The gum on my pair of 6 x 16 x 12' pine benchtops, on sawhorses that claim 1600 libs each
    2 points
  40. They look great. As you say it was nice wood, but your form really brings it out.
    2 points
  41. Yes and Yes. I have a Stihl MS661 with a granberg mill.
    2 points
  42. Using my new to me method of mounting yard hydrants, I needed a way to bind the hydrant post to the 2" galvanized pipe support. I didn't want loose stuff sticking out for kids to get scratched on, so I found this. I bought the cheap Chinese copy tool off Amazon. I like it. I probably could have borrowed some regular steel strapping tools, but I wanted stainless steel.
    2 points
  43. I’ve worked decades in a noise hazard environment (aircraft maintenance) and I always used the foamy 3M EAR plugs. Put them in first thing and wore them all day. I continue that practice in the shop or while doing any other loud activities like mowing the lawn. Plugs are light and aren’t sweaty in the summer.
    2 points
  44. I've used General Finishes High Performance with good, non-yellow results. Water-borne finish certainly has different working properties for application, but it seems to be quite durable.
    2 points
  45. Great story @gee-dub and glad to hear you’re using them again, I’m with @BonPacific, I have some of my father’s and grandfather’s tools and use one of them on every project even when I don’t have to just to have them in my hands
    2 points
  46. Thanks for the input - agreed its tough to gauge value. I usually price out based on eBay searches, but I couldn’t really find anything comparable right now. Saw some LN smoothing planes, etc. but not super helpful in helping me determine current value. Side note - I noticed you replied to one of my first project posts back in the day! Great to see you’re still on here! Funny enough, I divorced (that’s not the funny part, lol) about 3 years ago and that bunk bed project was one of only a handful of things I took with me. I never placed much sentimental value on objects but put way too much love into that to not take it with me.
    2 points
  47. There have actually been 6 different chemicals that are historically used to treat utility poles. Often the treatment varies by region. Either it's coal-tar creosote, PCP, CCA, or others it's best to avoid all use of the wood for any object that will have regular human contact. If you are referencing my post above, I was attempting to make it clear that there is a significant difference between Creosote generated from the combustion of coal, and the creosote that is generated from the combustion of wood. I was just trying to highlight that some terms can be misleading, like saying chemicals are harmful. The proper disposal for anything that has been treated with coal-tar creosote is a landfill certified for it's disposal. I would advise against using it in your yard for any reason, I wouldn't allow it into any dwelling I own (garage, shed or lean-to). I definitely wouldn't burn it.
    2 points
  48. Last minute update. I just spoke to my wife’s nephew who is a whiz at electronics, not knowing if he had a camera or alarm system. He has been using Vivint for 4.5 years and has no qualms with their service or equipment. And even though he has had a “soft” contract with them for that long, my monthly cost is just $11 more than his. I think that will be the route I go. Down side is one more darn app on my phone!
    2 points