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  1. This week I decided it was time to make a couple upgrades to my existing tool. First I replaced my 1950's Craftsman jointer with a new Grizzly 6" jointer. Then I I upgraded my crappy HF 8" drill press with a new 12" Grizzly drill press. I decided to mount it to my large Husky too box. To do this I had to move my spindle sander to my small Husky tool box. This is where I had my old drill press mounted. I originally put the new one on it but I decided it felt to unstable.
    12 points
  2. The look with finish and hardware. And the client dropped by. They both had big smiles and were very pleased. I work for a 2 part paycheck. The money and pleasing the client. Naturally I like money but the clients with a big grin and many not begged for accolades is a big part of the paycheck. Pleasing clients motivates me too.
    12 points
  3. I had a request from a friend to build a chess board for his wife's birthday. I figured it would be a fun project so I agreed. My plan was to make the board out of veneer initially but couldn't wrap my mind around how to ensure the veneer was cut perfectly. So instead i cut 1/8" thick shop veneer and just used the table saw. I started by sawing enough veneer to make roughly 2 boards as I'd need to do a balanced panel. Once i had the veneer cut and sanded on the drum sander I ripped out 2.25" wide strips. I figured it'd be easiest to make this like a cutting board and glue the pieces together into a board then cross cut strips. I used plywood cauls to keep everything nice and flat. Then alternating the cross cut strips it was easy to build out the checkerboard. The backside was more walnut and maple, I didn't go through the effort to make the hidden underside checkered but it still looks nice. To glue the checkerboard onto the Baltic birch core, i used blue tape that I stretched out. There is just enough elasticity in painters tape to hold a project like this together. On the left side of the core i glued down a scrap strip that I jointed and used to align the checkerboard. It helped me get everything strait and square. after glued I'd just trim this piece off. To glue my shop veneer down i used a layer of pink insulation 3 pieces of plywood and a lot of cauls and clamps. I just used my regular TB II wood glue. This got me some good squeeze out around the edges so I figured it got me enough pressure. I really should buy a vacuum bag kit. After the glue set I trimmed the board to size this revealed a nice sandwich with no visible voids. After the core was done I just made a frame and box to raise the board a bit. Finish was applied and project complete. I used miters to make the frame and box that acts as the stand. The corners of the box were reinforced with splines.
    12 points
  4. Last summer I helped my youngest granddaughter, nine at the time, make a coffee table. A couple of weeks ago my seventeen year old granddaughter ask if I could help her Make a jewelry box for her boy friends birthday. In both cases I was just the teacher and safety adviser. They both did the actual work. I thought I would post some pictures of different parts of the process. Making miter cuts for the box sides. Appling finish to the insides of the box before the glue up. The box all glued up. Thats her tray prototype in the back ground. Making a blade change. Setting the miter gauge stop block There is a tray that goes in the box and here she is cutting the miters on some of those parts. The tray glued up and the box itself. Gluing up... ... and assembling the dividers for the tray. Some final sanding before applying finish to the outsides of things. And finally spraying the top coat. I should add that the box, tray and lid handle are all Cherry and the lid itself is Birdseye Maple. A couple of finished project shots.
    12 points
  5. Joinery cut and dry fit.
    12 points
  6. It was Saturday but due to a premature baby for the scheduled officiant I was honored to marry my youngest Oh and a little woodworking project too
    11 points
  7. From Spurtleville, a small hamlet SE of Houston. We are going to Louisiana tomorrow to visit some of my wife’s relatives and she asked if I would make a couple of these as gifts. Thanks Dave!
    10 points
  8. had the grandkids on an adventure to the 4th Street cable car, billed as the worlds shortest, steepest, then to Maquoketa Caves State Park for a cave walk, awesome place and down to the Mississippi River Museum and Aquarium to pet the stingrays
    10 points
  9. Bought this 2 months ago and just hung it up. Should have done this sooner.
    9 points
  10. Found a bumble on the bee balm.
    9 points
  11. Not too exciting @Coop, 30 cutting boards, some round, some rectangular, half laser engraved with a company logo, pays great but boring production work
    8 points
  12. I am restoring a Limbert saddle seat arm chair circa 1915. The middle back slat was blown out and the chair must have been out in the elements. I used Jeff Jewitt's formula #4 in his article. I substituted Waterlox instead of GF Arm R Seal. It came out a more red than I wanted. All in all, I'm pretty happy with the result.
    8 points
  13. DC Shed Exterior Complete Well, that oughta do it for the outside. I think I will take the afternoon off. Tomorrow I will add the insulation. Still to come is the interior wall covering, electrical and of course, install the cyclone.
    8 points
  14. The faces are installed. The 4 large drawers were more of a challenge due to their weight and size. Mating the drawer slides takes more effort for larger drawers. The hardware, KV8400, is very easy to operate. Trial and error, adjust then trial and error and adjust... Being old and small the 4 large drawers test me. The rest are easy. The worst was the 2 large middle drawers. Because there is a plywood horizontal panel it makes it tougher to locate the pilot holes to the face. Next time any horizontal panels above drawers will be a frame. The other 7 drawers I drill a 6 penny size hole that the nail is snug in the inner panel of the drawer face. Then clamp and shim the drawer face firm. Then strike the nail for a perfect pilot hole location. Then drill out the nail hole in the front of the drawer box 3/8" with a brad point for accuracy. On the inside of the box I use #14 SS oval head with a SS grommet. That leaves me some adjustment with the 3/8 hole.Cant do that on the 2 middle large drawers. Plywood is in the way. After dealing with the drawer slides I needed to make some sawdust. The front and back of the drawers were made a little thicker to accomadate the dado for removable dividers. There were a few steps in making the dividers that was enjoyable compared to the slides. I made 2 holes then saber saw. The holes were made on my woodpecker table. The fence and hinged stops made quick and accurate work. First use of the fence that way. I ran a router with a roundover in the handle. the top edge was rounded on my router table. The set up was already in place from the drawers. All I had to do was turn on the switch. The dividers are 1/2" oak veneer. I chose not to use solid being a loose panel it might distort.
    8 points
  15. A little addition to the story here. My youngest daughter is her mom and and her and her family live right next door. Stephanie, the granddaughter is a typical teenager in that she likes to sleep late into the day during the summer. So when we started she would come over at about 10:30 AM. After a couple of days she called me and asked if she could come over at 9:30 AM then the next week she wanted to start a 9 AM. I may end up having to give her her own key to the shop.
    8 points
  16. And from Spurtleville North, a small hamlet west of Dubuque, great minds think alike @Coop, gave my last 2 to Jan’s sister who was in town, had to make another batch, those look great Coop !
    7 points
  17. Thanks! Funny you should mention that. On the way home I get a text hey dad I bought you some truffles but forgot to give them to you so not only does he get my daughter he gets my chocolate too lol. Lucky for me he is very nice and more importantly is really good for, and too, our daughter
    7 points
  18. That looks like a blast, Dave! Prior to the flood of 2010, Opry Mills Mall in Nashville had a 'Stingray Reef'. Little Cody loved to go there after his quarterly visits to Vanderbilt, and pet the rays. He was always soaking wet and smelled like fish on the 2.5 hour ride home...
    7 points
  19. Hi All, I hope you are having a great day in the Shop! Most of us are looking to improve our techniques and work efficiency so that we are capable of producing the best finished project possible. Some of the tings that help or hurt us in the shop are our tools. Using a tool not suited for a task can be dangerous and not very productive, while the right tools can make each step in the process a real joy. I know "The Tools do not a Craftsman Make" but let's face it they are fun to have I am always searching to upgrade when I can and I have been looking for a Clayton OSS for a very long time and have not been able to run one down that I could afford. I was looking for a bench top model and I found this on Facebook Marketplace. These models are usually found in production shops and are usually beat to death by time they are put up for sale. This one has spent it's entire life in a Hobby Shop. It has a baldor motor and it came with not one but two big boxes of sanding sleeves in all the sizes 30 bags of the sleeves have never been opened and each bag contains all the sleeves for the different sized drums. I paid less for this than I would have paid for a good used bench top model and with all the accessories and paper it was a steal of a deal. It has all the different sized drums and the plate covers for each size neatly stored and organized behind the front access door. This will replace my Rigid OSS/Oscillating belt sander unit.
    7 points
  20. Closer and closer . . .
    7 points
  21. Finally got the end table done. Although not perfect, it’s probably the piece of furniture I’ve made.
    7 points
  22. I've been negligent in updating this. Finished up the build about a week ago and applied the finish (2 coats Osmo). Now I'm waiting on my upholstery guy, who took the month of July off. I'll get him the piece later this month and he is ordering the fabric, so I should be first in line when he reopens. Well enough small talk, back to the build; Last thing I needed to complete was the seat frame. I struggled to figure this out, because in reality the space for the seat frame was not totally square. In gluing up this long piece and doing it in sections I was really happy with how close I actually got to square, but I was worried if I built the seat frame and tried to fit it to the space it would be a headache. So my solution was to build the frame in the space instead of outside the space. I figured with the dominos everything should just slide together, and then I would assure I had a good fit in all the crucial areas. So here's the seat frame dry fitted together; For assembly I started by gluing in the back piece, here it is in place with the mortises and the 3 critical cross supports. These cross supports are critical because they will be glued to the sides and the middle leg and will act as reinforcements to racking. You can also see in this pic I added some extra support behind the front underneath cross piece for the seat panel to sit on: Here's how one critical area looks. I glued two blocks to the side frame, the back of the seat frame is glued in place, and I'll glue the cross piece of the frame to the blocks and the side; And here's how that piece will fit in place, so you can see I've got a lot of good long grain to long grain gluing surface; The plan is to glue the cross pieces into the back piece via dominos, also glue the cross pieces to the front underneath support, and then glue the front of the seat panel into the cross pieces via dominos while gluing it down to the front underneath support, all at the same time. This was going to be a difficult glue up, so I used Titebond Extend, and the domino mortises were cut wider then the dominos, as putting the front of the frame into 13 dominos at the same time required a little wiggle room. Here's the front piece of the seat frame with the domino mortises; And here's the glue up, no time for pics during this complicated glue up; So after I was done with that I changed my underwear and did some clean up sanding which was very minimal as I used the glue sparingly in the final glue up. And here's the final piece with the finish; Now I just need to be patient with my upholstery guy, but overall I was very pleased with the result and i think it will look nice when the cushions are done. let's hope my wife agrees!
    7 points
  23. Then the base was started These are the sugar maple They stretchers are ash Dry assembly to check mortise and tenon alignment Jig for top of the legs Tops of the legs that will NEVER been seen again Base assembly all done with the bench bolts added Face vise under bench work Face vise hardware test fit install Hard maple is fun to chisel - NOT
    7 points
  24. People are stopping by our house today, giving me compliments on it. The 4th of July weekend is always crazy at the lake. Everyone that has a place is here, along with multiple guests. I wouldn't live here if it was like this all the time. If you look closely, you may be able to see the stainless steel hinges. The roof hinges to access the solar light. Most cupolas have a copper roof. The roof turns dark, and it doesn't really stand out. I thought white would be more showy, and could be see from way up the lake. This roof is Marine Baltic Birch plywood, with a couple of layers of fiberglass cloth over it, painted with Sherwin Williams Emerald Gloss. There are many Great Blue Herons on the lake.
    7 points
  25. It's blueberry season here in Delaware, and it's been a record crop for me. Love this time of year. Just our haul from picking for an hour after work last night; This is still what the bushes look like after last night's picking;
    7 points
  26. This thing is getting heavy! After wrestling it to the floor I cleaned up the sides with a #5 set very fine. I wiped them down with some paint thinner to get an idea what it will look like. Not too shabby I think.
    6 points
  27. I started with the tails on the main box panels. Tails were cut on the table saw with a blade ground to a 7 degree top angle. For the pin / half blind side I sawed to the line then removed some waste with the drill press and picked up the chisels. That went fine for a couple of corners, when I got to corner3 I ran into some wild grain diving towards the outside of the case so I resorted to the router with a straight bit and a guide bushing after chopping out the first 3/16 of depth.
    6 points
  28. Almost done with the drywall. A little more touch up and some minor sanding and I should be ready for paint.
    6 points
  29. Some of the progress on the DC shed. Insulation (for sound deadening) is in and most of the wall board is up. I was just going to use 1/8" hardboard like I did for a couple other small buildings in the area. I then started picturing myself looking for something I dropped or wanting to do maintenance in the shed and thought white walls would be smart. I found a white glossy finished 1/8" hardboard product at Lowe's. I did some on the fly figuring (in 100 degree heat) and figured a few extra bucks was worth not having to paint them. I am not going for a magazine layout in this shed, I just want some thing to protect the insulation while I am slaming around in there on disco night . Seriously though, I poked a couple tears in the insulation already while moving around in the close quarters and I am pretty careful. A strip of 1/4 round and some dabs of white caulk and I'll be happy. You may notice the 8' panels in the 9' to 10' structure. The upper area is just going to be exposed building wrap. Even I would have to try to poke holes in things up there.
    6 points
  30. Not much going on with this lately. Lots of sanding...I probably should have done more before assembling the curved frames. Now I have a lot of areas that a ROS won't fit, so a block and elbow grease come into play. Meanwhile, attempts continue to match existing furniture in the room. This color sample has a base of Rustoleum "Weathered Gray" (2 heavy coats), and a coat of GF High Performance as a sealer. Then I masked the center, and used Rustoleum "Ebony" stain on the left, GF Black Milk Paint on the right, to highlight the grain. Milk paint was wiped back immediately with a wet rag. Ebony stain was rubbed in, wiped back, then allowed to set for 20 minutes. When it was almost dry, I scuffed the surface with a red abrasive pad to remove most of the black from surface, leaving only the grain. Another coat of HP over it all. Photo sent to the client, and they think they like the ebony side best, but I will take it by for an in-person examination tomorrow. Naturally, this is the most complicated finishing schedule. I will be forced to pre-finish almost every piece, to avoid the struggle of scraping black out of all the inside corners. Of course, this complicates the glue-up even more than it already was. Why do I get myself into these things????
    6 points
  31. The DC shed is skinned, roofed and doored. The roofing is stiched in. And we have a door. Still need the last of the trim and some paint touch up. The on to the electrical within the shed.
    6 points
  32. She would like to make a dressing or make up table with a mirror for her room.
    6 points
  33. Frank Miller lumber in Union city, Ind. One of the largest mills for QSWO. I have been dealing with them for years. They deal in lumber by freight cars on trains. For us they have the retail desk. Not retail prices. The last batch I got from them looks beautiful. Sometimes looks are deceiving. After I dressed the oak first a face on the jointer then the thickness planer. Some of the boards would loose their flatness after being planed. Some would dress flat and distort after I'd rip it. One of the benefits of using qswo is the lack of distortion. I called the mill and after a few pictures they gave me a full credit. Over the years there have been a few issues with other mills. Before I could explain they refused. I never expected a full credit. I am pleased and amazed.
    5 points
  34. Found a piece from my thicknessed stack large enough and with an OK color match to the front to cut a new left side from. For the right side I needed to go to a fresh board and do the complete milling evolution. Anyway, both now cut to the correct length and ready to start over
    5 points
  35. No rule of thumb on this one. Some folks go with a wall full of horizontal cleats every 6-8 inches. This lets you put small fixtures in place with a high degree of flexibility. I make larger fixtures that have small items in them. These pics are from the temp shop currently in use. The cleats were one of the first things to go up. I find 3 or 4 long cleats at heights that hang at the "right" height work best for me. The "right" height for me is not so high I can't reach my long clamps and not so low that the lower fixture hits the ground. In between things should hang from one cleat and rest against the next one or two down. I don't bother with cutouts for the cabinets to set flush. This would kill my flexibility with this system. I need to be able hang most things most places as I change things . . . like my mind Here's one iteration of the old shop: In the end it seems you could decide on Lots-o-Cleats: Or a few cleats and then design your fixtures from there.
    5 points
  36. I upgraded the lighting in my shop today. It previously only had 4 single bulb fixtures so I had to have task lighting at every tool and bench. I installed 10 4ft LED and it is fantastic! Also my wife has demanded that I buy myself a sawstop, so it’s a rough life. Just need to decide on the final build specs and hope the wait time isn’t too long.
    5 points
  37. Started on the sliding tail vise hardware installation yesterday. Had to mill out a 7/16" deep mortise for the main body of the internal slider to fit in. I used the LN Router plane and it worked great. This top is REALLY heavy Testing the fit to make sure the jaw will slide freely Now I have to hog out a 2" wide by 9" long by 3/4" deep dado on the bottom of the bench so that once installed the vise can be adjusted.
    5 points
  38. Match jointing a couple 1/2"+ poplar boards to glue up for a dust partition. Woodriver #6
    5 points
  39. I have a lot of sanding to do. Then on to the finish.
    5 points
  40. Thanks guys. The wife already made the mistake of commenting on how I cold put shelves up near the top of the DC shed to "store stuff" ;-). I explained again that this shed is only designed to hold the DC, its associated electrical equipment, and leave me room to easily remove and replace the waste barrel. I'm working on some custom trim pieces to make the attachment point under the eaves look more seamless. Once those are painted and installed I will touch up paint things like the rafter tails and some of the soffit areas and it should be a done deal.
    5 points
  41. You guys are a little older than me, but I'm still working more than full time. I figure I'll work until 10 o'clock on the morning of my funeral.
    4 points
  42. After a lot of fiddling and fussing the 24" face vise is completed. We are in the home stretch now, the sliding tail vise is the last phase........ No racking at all in this vise and it is a smooth operator, I am definitely going to be spoiled with this!
    4 points
  43. Did a little rearranging and cutting to length.
    4 points
  44. I have a neighbor that dabbles in antiques and is in Ohio on a vacation and antique search. She called earlier and had found two slabs, advertised as Chestnut from a 1700’s log cabin for sale. One 3.5” x 12” x 9’ and the other 4” x 11” x 9’ for $155 for the two and is willing to bring them back to Houston for me. She took some pics that were not real defining but I took a chance and told her to grab them for me. They both have the live edges on both sides and can only assume they were part of the cabin walls. May be a neat deal or may be a conversation piece/fire wood?
    4 points
  45. If you have the funds, the Lie Nielsen Bench in my humble opinion would be the best store bought option. I couldn't afford to buy one of theirs so I am currently in the process of building one.
    4 points
  46. I used his #5 (Aurora) finish process on a media cabinet a few years back. I was extremely happy with the out come. @KevinartmanI think his photo samples are all showing up a little light then what they are. I have seen some of Jewitt's stuff on a video and it looked quite a bit different then the sample on you link.
    4 points
  47. We have always had a family car but my main vehicle since 1975 has been a truck. If I didn't have a truck to drive I would probably have to be institutionalized for my own safety.
    4 points
  48. First update since early last year contains dozens of corrections, additions, and more synonyms. Functionality of the app is unchanged. http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/wood_name_database/ the data set contains: 170,000+ combinations of common name/species name (based on the raw data as follows) 140,000+ common names 26,000+ species names 300+ family names
    4 points