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  1. 19 points
    This project was for me. It's a tall desk with a partially sloped top and shelf for computer monitors. Been working on this since before Christmas. I used a story stick for the legs - worked great.
  2. 18 points
    This was turned from a single piece of cocobolo 8 ½” square by 17/4. The surface is sanded to P1200, but with no coatings, just au naturale. With successive convolved designs I have been looking at what happens when the contour lines of the upright and basin are altered. With Sedona the upright and basin are both formed from straight lines. In many ways this shape was the most difficult convolved form to design, engineer and make that I have done so far. For one thing I had to be very particular about the acute angle in the corners. It’s about 40 degrees reflecting the fact that my diamond detail tool is 36 degrees, so about as tight a space as I could work in. Access for hollowing also narrowly limits the possible positions for the upright and basin walls. And quite honestly it is a lot more difficult to make a surface straight rather than curved.
  3. 16 points
    A fun project for my Grandson.
  4. 16 points
    This month I was one of the turners featured in the Members Gallery of American Woodturner magazine. I know it's not the "Nobel Prize for Woodworking", but still pretty cool to me.
  5. 16 points
    I liked Marc's breadbox build very much. Alison liked most of it. We compromised and below is the result. Air-dried walnut with ambrosia maple door and drawer, with ebony pulls.
  6. 15 points
    A number of years ago, I built my wife a computer desk of white oak with some storage. But it took up and enormous amount of room. Since she's not around to use it any more, I figured I could simplify the space and still have access to the computer. I use her computer for background music when I doing house things. You know, dishes, vacuum, read and sketch stuff. So I built this little table , that might be called an entry table or sofa table. It's made from "very" soft Maple. It's so soft, it made me think that Pine was a hardwood. This Maple is curly, and has a bunch of Sp[alting and around this part of the country it's also called "wormy" Maple. Which is Ambrosia Maple to woodworkers. I bought this wood air dried from @Spanky more than a year ago, and it was 7' long 4/4 thick and 15" wide. It sat stickered in my shop for about a year. So it was dry an d ready to work. If nothing else, it's an eyecatcher. There's a small strip of Cherry along the bottom of the aprons, that I like.
  7. 15 points
    I have had this drawer cabinet under my saw for three years and over time have decided that I wasn't totally happy with how it was working out and it also created a bit of a knuckle scrapper when using the hand wheel to adjust the blade tilt on the saw. So after seeing a blade storage idea that I really liked on another forum I decided it was time to start fresh and replace the old one. The old one had three drawers with ridge foam insulation that had been routed out to hold blades and other fixtures and tools. The new one also has three drawers, with one drawer at this time, with nothing in it so thats a plus. Its also five inches narrower so the knuckles are safe. I still have to get one more knob for the little drawer at the top but I stuck on a scrap of sapele for now so I can get in to it. A peek of the old one in the bottom of the picture. And the NEW - Plenty of room to turn now.
  8. 15 points
    Finally home from a long work road trip! Had some catching up to do! A few projects to get done that have been piling up! Only the bathroom vanity was done for YouTube.. 1. Table Lazy Susan and a cutting board for 2 different clients.. 2. A thread storage cabinet for my wife's quilting room 3. Bathroom Vanity for a client. 4. And, a floating picture frame for a family member..
  9. 15 points
    Most all of you saw the Final Gift for my Wife when she passed. She and I agreed that I would build her final resting place. It was a painful and joyous experience. Since then I pondered what was next for me, being alone and old with only a house mouse to share my days. After 4 or 5 months of mourning and praying, and crying, I thought I could help other people with the expense of buying a casket. On average, caskets run about $2500.00 and the sky's the limit from there. We have a local sales site, somewhat like Craigslist, but it's just for Middle Tennessee. You can find anything you want on that site, and it's mostly nice local country folk, for the most part. So, I put an ad with a couple of pictures of the casket I built for my wife. It got a ton of hits, but it took a few months before anyone called. We talked, and he drove 30 miles to come talk with me and tell me what he wanted done. His idea was he wanted just a plain Pine box, with the exception that he wanted it made out of Cedar. The reason was he had a source for inexpensive Cedar and a source for drying that Cedar. It was coming from his property, which made it personal. What he wanted from me was the labor to construct it. We talked about my hourly rate, and settled on what amount of time I would have in it and we agreed on a price. He then told me, that he really wanted two done. One each for him and his wife. They're just simple nice church going folks and felt that the trees were his and he didn't want anything fancy. I can do "not" fancy. So he went about getting the trees cut, milled and dried, I took some time, and life has a way of interrupting the flow of things. I had a horrible back surgery, and when I was just about ready to start, he broke some bones in his foot. After we were both healed for the most part, he brought the wood. Nice tight Cedar, 1" thick 6" wide and more or less 8' long. The frustration for me is that there was an enormous amount of sap wood, and I wanted to try and use as little of that as possible. With Cedar, your gonna get sapwood no matter what you try to do. In the process of constructing these I was very choosy with the boards, and as I was putting things together, I invited him down several times to get a feel for the process. Each time he dropped by, he wanted to make a change about design. Since the changes he wanted were in front of what I was already doing, it wasn't a major problem. But I told him finally, "every time you come here you add more time in the construct and your cost is going up each time". He said okay, just add it to my tab. The final construct is large box joints at all four corners, with all the joints pinned with contrasting dowels, a small piece of trim on the side that can hardly be seen. Hand rails that I had to make extra, because in the start of this build I had told him I had some Poplar just the perfect size for the rails. He wanted Cedar. So Cedar he got The insides are finished with one coat of satin poly, the exterior has a base coat of satin poly and two coats of gloss poly. And they are for the most part, plain caskets They are dried and cured and he's coming this week, to pick them up one at a time. He's going to store them in a room in his house that is climate controlled, then he has a friend in the cardboard business that is going to double wrap them and seal them close til they are needed. All this because Cedar "sucks", to work with, sucks moisture and twists and warps like a pole dancer. But here they are. Comments are welcome. Oh, and since he and his wife have been married more than 50 years, I figured they kinda like each other, so I added one single adornment on the lid of each one at no charge.
  10. 14 points
    I thought that the build might begin with preparing the panels, since there has been some interest in the past shown in the shorter Hammer K3 sliders. Mine has a 49" long slider and a 31" wide table for the rip fence. The build is an entry hall table for a wedding present for a niece. Her choice was this mid century modern piece, which will be the basis for the build. My job is to re-invent it somewhat. She wants Jarrah, and I have managed to find something spectacular ... a subtle fiddleback (curly) set of boards that will make a book match (as they are only about 9" wide each). Most imagine that the value of a slider lies with cross-cutting. It certainly is so. However it is the rip using the slider - rather than the rip fence - which is so amazing. One side of each board was to be ripped on the slider, before being jointed and resawn. Ripping on the slider is such an advantage with life edges. No jigs required. No rip fence to slide against. Just clamp the board on the slider, and run it past the saw blade. The long sliders can complete the rip in one quick pass. It occurred to me that I should take a few photos of ripping to width since the boards are longer than the slider. Here you can see that it comes up short ... In actuality, with the blade raised fully, there is a cut of nearly 54" ... The solution is to use a combination square to register the position of the side of the board at the front, and then slide the board forward and reposition it ... ... and repeat at the rear ... The result is a pretty good edge, one that is cleaned up on the jointer in 1 or 2 passes, and then ready for resawing ... This is the glued panel. It is long enough to make a waterfall two sides and top section (still oversize) ... The following photo shows the lower section at the rear. What I wanted to show is the way boards are stored. Since I shall not get back to this build until next weekend, all boards are stickered and clamped using steel square sections. The steel sections are inexpensive galvanised mild steel. These are covered in vinyl duct tape to prevent any marks on the wood and ease in removing glue ... Done for the day ... Enough for the case (top/bottom and sides), which will be through dovetailed with mitred corners, the stock for 4 legs (yet to be turned), and rails for the legs (the legs will be staked mortice-and-tenon) and attached with a sliding dovetail. Regards from Perth Derek
  11. 14 points
    I know I didn’t know what one was either, it’s a fancy board for cheese, meat, veggies and dip, crackers, used for when friends or family get together. This one is for my wife’s birthday, Hard Maple and Sapele with box joints on the ends and bent lamination strips down the middle, thanks for looking guys
  12. 14 points
    Yeah so I'm supposed to be working on dining chairs. My excuse was I needed to get material before i could progress on the project but in reality I really wanted to make something for my shop. So while i waited for a chance to get a lumber order into my schedule I grabbed a bunch of the 8/4 cherry i got a good deal on.Why cherry? Because everyone does maple and I want to do something different.. ( I also got the cherry for a steal. I didn't want to be wasteful with the lumber and the boards I had were odd widths. Everything was 7-7/8" wide which is frustrating. So i ripped half the boards I needed with 1 extra. I then took the too narrow boards and proceeded to make them wider. This is a bench not a piece of furniture so if some glue seams show up on end grain so be it. Odds are it's not going to be noticeable. The boards I laminated to get the needed thickness were placed towards the center. I also had some boards with heavy wane. I made sure that I coordinated them within the slab and used them as the picture below shows better than I can explain. Yep there is a big void in the center of my bench towards the bottom. Do I care? Heck no! it's going to be buried inside the bench never to be seen what does it matter? One of the boards had some really awesome figure. So I pulled one piece of that board out to make it the front laminate. The 2nd board was used as the show face of the rear slab. The board for the rear slab was a tiny bit thin so there is a piece laminated to the bottom. I tried to grain match it some and get a similar color board. In the end it's hard to tell and I'm happy with it. After lots of milling and emptying this thing twice, I got al the material for the slabs milled and together. I even used cherry dominoes for alignment. I used Marc's hit and miss planing method to somewhat straiten the boards. This worked well and left me a LOT more material than he ended up with. I was able to do my rear slab with 6 pieces instead of 7 and my front is 4 pieces with a random stick of 3/4" thrown in for some extra width. While gluing the slabs together I was worried i was going to induce a bow. These boards were NOT strait at this point. I rotated them to offset as much as possible but in the end the chance that the slabs would be strait is low. SO i stacked the deck in my favor. Bent lamination uses a form to hold a curve the opposite can also be done. So i grabbed the front laminate strip and jointed it perfectly strait. I then rotated it and clamped it along both slabs during glue up and this will ensure that the side is strait and because all the boards are an even thickness everything is parallel. In practice this worked just as well as in theory. My 52" veritas strait edge confirmed that these guys are laser strait. I used some winding sticks and confirmed that they were free of twist. Holy !!!!! These things are heavy! Next up is end cap and the mortise and stuff. I trimed the front slab to length and then cut the tenon. I glued up some walnut that I scored of C_list a while ago for cheap. This stuff was some guys shorts, and were like 18" long and perfect for this. The color ended up being surprisingly beautiful. I cut the mortise in the end cap easy peasy. I extended the mortise and am setting my bench up to be able to come apart. I don't have the BC hardware yet and will probably use this bench for a while before I buy the tail vise. I'll buy the leg vise prior to completing the bench. So I drilled the holes in the end cap and am using some 6" long spax screws to attach it to the front slab. Now the first big OH !@$(%! moment happens. I realized I drilled the internal hole with a 1-3/8" forstner bit instead of a 1-1/2" bit. So taking a breath I grabbed a block of walnut because it's what i had sitting in the scrap bin. I drilled a hole all the way through like 1/16", this is the guide for the forstner bits. I drilled one side with the 1-3/8" bit and the other with the 1-1/2" bit. I used the smaller bit to line up the block on the outside of the bench. I fed it through the inside as seen below. Once i had the block lined up on the outside I used the 1-1/2" bit to drill the rest of the way through the guide block and into the end cap. After I got a good way into the end cap i took everything apart and finished the hole on the drill press to make sure that it was strait. Next is the dog hole strip. After reading the part on this. I decided my time was worth more than the cool factor of square dogs. So I glued up three 3/4" pieces and made the dog hole strip. To get everything lined up I ran dominoes through all 3 laminations and into the bench. The dominoes were 65mm long and this worked flawlessly. So here we sit. As i work through this I'll hit periods where glue needs to dry. I"m going to take that time to work on the templates for the dining chairs and get the bent lamination mold for the back rest started. This walnut color is going to look awesome with finish.
  13. 14 points
    4 file drawers and 2 small on top. Yet to come an 8/4 walnut top.. Then open shelves above...And another 8/4 top above the shelves... Panels are mill run fas walnut book matched. First project with my new Jessem. Very user friendly.And powerful with a 3.25hp porter cable.
  14. 14 points
    I made this bench for my mechanic, in payment for some auotmobile work I needed done. I made a profit from that trade. Curly Cherry and a live edge.
  15. 13 points
    I started a new project/adventure yesterday. Of the four, my 10 year old grand daughter is the grand kid that has always shown the desire to learn woodworking, she is also the youngest. The intelligent questions that come out of her mouth can stun a college professor. So I decided to ask her what she would like to build, you know bird house, napkin holder, those kind of things. Nope, that wasn't going to work, she said with no hesitation I want to build a coffee table for my mom and dad. So that is the project. We spent some time looking at pictures of coffee tables on the internet, after we got some ideas we drew up a design and I showed her how to make a cut list. Then off to the lumber yard. Yesterday in the shop we rough cut all the pieces, jointed and planned them and then stickered them for a couple of days. She is a quick learner and understands the process of being safe so when I took each of these pictures I had her turn the tool off so I could take the picture with out worrying about her safety at the same time. When she was putting pieces through the planer, my wife took the pictures because I was catching for her. The only thing my grand daughter didn't want to do was running the pieces through the jointer so I did that for her and I was glad that she was willing to make a decision like that instead of thinking she "had to" do everything. Laying out parts with a her tape measure and caulk. Rough cut to length with the jig saw. Ripping to rough width at the band saw. Running things through the planer. And Stickering.
  16. 13 points
    This took 7 months to get to me.
  17. 13 points
    I'm exhausted from taking care of her as she grew weaker this past week, but sleep won't come. She deserved someone much better than me, but put up with me all these years. A couple weeks ago I started thinking about Richard going through the same thing, so I messaged him a few times. Thanks to everyone for the thoughts and prayers.
  18. 13 points
    I finally finished with this project. The top is made from a single piece of butternut and the bottom is made from a block of wood that was labelled English walnut, but turned out to be teak. This was the blank I asked about in the Wood section and @phinds was kind enough to evaluate. @Chestnut, I know you particularly wanted to see the figure, but after turning and sculpting there's almost nothing left of the indented grain pattern. There is a little visible in the right hand pillar of the first two photo's.
  19. 13 points
    As I've promised I'm going to journal my next Maloof Rocker build. This is one of my favorite all time builds and this will be my 5th rocker in the past 2 years (third rocker of this year). I started building chairs about 4 years ago and it has become an obsession to me. During that time period I've built approx 30 chairs. I've learned a lot along the way. For all those who have been wanting to start this build I'd encourage you to get started, it is a challenging but immensely satisfying build. Since this is a guild project I'll be following basically Marc's instructions and I'll point out where I've deviated from his directions. Marc does a great job with this build and with my first rocker I followed his directions down to the letter. Since then I've built chairs that were from plans supplied by Charles Brock and Scott Morrison. I've picked up a few tricks from these guys and my build will be an amalgamation of what I've learned from all three. The wood will be some gorgeous curly hard maple from @Spanky, I'm excited to use this lumber. I ordered two batches from him and one batch is a little more curly than the other, but I think it will all look great in the end. I know one thing, I'm saving every scrap of this during the build. Finally, in some of my past builds many of you have asked how long it takes me for one of these builds, I'll try my best to record the time I take to complete each step and try to keep a running tally as I go. I originally thought I'd start this around Thanksgiving, but I'm getting an earlier start. This build will be slow though, as it's prime surf fishing season here in the Mid-Atlantic region, and I'll be playing hooky from work and from the shop to wet a line. Started the project by going thru the stock and began milling the parts. The seat is made from 5 pieces, approx 4" wide and 22" long. I had a board that was 11" wide, I was able to get two 22" lengths from this board and then I was able to get two 4.25" wide boards from each length and one 2.5" wide board from each length. I glued these two thinner boards together to make the center board for the seat; Back legs, always good to get these from the same board and I had nice grain to follow at the bottom of the leg, headrest will likely come from the piece above and the adder blocks will come from the waste between the legs; The front legs and the arms; The back slats, you need 7, I'll cut out 8; The plan calls for the width of the back slats is to be 1.5", I like my slats a little skinnier, these will be around 1.25", to me wide back slats look clunky. No matter how wide the main part of the back slat is, it still goes down to a 3/8th" tenon into the headrest, so thinner back slats are not weaker; This is my piece for the rocker laminations, unfortunately I found some bark inclusions as I was prepping. I should have enough usable material and I can work around those inclusions; Once stock selection was completed I moved on to the 5 seat boards. Glued up the 2 skinnier boards, jointed, planed and cut to length. Once that is completed I need to cut the 3 degree bevels for the coopered seat. These bevels will be on both sides of the middle board and on the out side of both boards that join with the middle board. You can see the direction of the bevels marked on the end of the boards in this pic; ****Real quick, a point about the coopered seat, I've done these seats both ways, coopered and just flat. I do like the coopered look a little better, but it's not extreme. The flat seat also looks pretty darn good. The coopered seat is definitely an option you can use or skip.**** Cutting the bevels, table saw set at 3 degrees: Bevels cut and marking out domino placement; This next step is really a little tricky, you need to domino into a beveled surface on some boards. Marc does a nice job of this and cuts all his slots with the 90 degree guide on the domino retracted, and the base of the domino sitting on his workbench. This results in a domino slot positioned toward the bottom of the boards and out of the way for future sculpturing, but is very difficult to do on boards 2 and 4, as the bevel orientation makes it difficult to get a correctly positioned domino slot and have it perpendicular with the face of the board. But his technique works great for the centerboard joints. Below is a pic of the domino cutting the slots into the centerboard, you put the domino on the bench and slightly tilt to the face is perpendicular the the joint, it's hard to see if it's tilted, but it is, the opposing surface for this joint is 90 degrees, so you simply put the domino on the bench and plunge into the 90 degree surface; Now with the other joints, the angle of the bevel prevents you for doing what I did above. So instead I set the angle of the domino to 87 degrees and cut the slot using the fence. To do this you need to put the fence on the bottom of the board as the reference for your plunge cut; Charles Brock handles cutting the dominos a little differently than Marc did, and I do a mix of their techniques. Now that the dominos slots are cut, I assemble and cut the seat to the correct width, you do this by cutting the excess equally for both outside boards. Once the width is correct I draw the outline for sculpting the seat; Pre-sculpting bandsaw reduction is next. I want to cut my reduction with the 90 degree side of boards 2 and 4 on the bandsaw table, in this pic you see which side is which; I then draw a line 1" from the bottom and develop a reduction cut line from that. I take a lot off, I want a deep seat; Here's the board on the bandsaw, 90 degree jointed surface on the table. You can also see from the above pic I've got plenty of stock over my domino slots. The center board is tricky, you have a bevel on both sides; You can mess with your bandsaw table and put it at 3 degrees, or you can just cut from both sides, as the cut angles toward the surface and the end result is just a ridge in the middle of the board where your 2 cuts intersect; Here are my 3 center boards with their pre-sculpting cuts, you can see in the center board I just have a little ridge, toward the front I've cut out an outline for the pommel; Next are the joints that are cut into the outside boards and some pre-sculpting shaping. It's easier to do some gross shaping while the boards are apart. Almost forgot, I'm about 3.5 hours into this.
  20. 13 points
    I got finish applied. I did 3 coats total on all the base parts for the table and benches. For the seats of the benches and the table top I put down 5 coats. The wood dents fairly easily so I'm a bit concerned on the long term durability. Beings this is for my sister I'm goign to tell her to use it hard and if I need to make a new top for it someday that will not be a problem. Hopefully it fares better than I'm expecting and will just get little dents and scratches giving it good character instead. Table top thickness at 11/16" looks pretty good all things considered. I was a bit worried that leaning on it would cause the center of the table to sag a bit. I sat on the edge ... nothing. Stood in the center of the table ... nothing. I thought about doing a cleat or two to the underside to keep it flat but in the end i feel the table legs will accomplish that quite well. The heart wood of this birch is beautiful, Nothing wrong with the white sap wood but it juts doesn't have the depth and chatoyance that the heart wood does. Had to get that to come across in pictures. This bench was the worst offender for jointing and was cut into 5 parts. The glue lines are almost invisible. I used walnut wedges for securing the through tenon. I don't know why but I do LOVE wedged through tenons. The idea that i can make something very stable and sturdy and taking it apart and putting it together requires zero tools is just fun. IKEA can take a hike.
  21. 13 points
    Ok, @Spanky got me going to finish up this post. I had put my last coat of finish on the Rocker yesterday and so I went home at lunch to move it into the house and grab some pics. When I left off here I had to do the final sanding of the rockers and lower legs. Then it was wet down the whole rocker to raise the grain and then resand the whole rocker. Dye was applied next and again I had to resand the whole rocker! Once those very joyless tasks were completed I got to apply the finish and then for the first time see what this wood had to offer. Well it didn't disappoint, God made some beautiful wood here and Rickey was the man to find it! The wood is really the big star of this piece and the dye I used really made the figure POP. I hope @treeslayer approves. For the finish it was 3 coats of the Maloof oil/poly then 2 coats of Maloof oil/wax. Each coat was applied with a rag, let to sit and then rubbed down vigorously to remove all the excess. Last night as I was applying the last coat, I couldn't resist to snap a few pics of the figure. It really pops with the oil still wet; So finishing this was a complete joy. Here are a few pics of the chair; Some details. I love the horn detail, it seems so organic to me how it flows. Here's a shot of the headrest and the horns; Top of headrest flows into the front line or edge of the horn; Again you can see that flowing line and see how the cove of the horn flows into the concave area of the headrest; The contours of the bottom of the headrest; Inside of the arm detail; Great figure in the seat; Front leg detail; Leg to seat joints; Rocker to leg interface; And to wrap it up, here are the 3 rockers I've made this year, one from walnut, one out of cherry, and the last from some great Spanky curly maple; Thanks for following. Hopefully I was helpful with posting this build. I can't say enough how much I enjoy this build. I will likely not make another one of these until I get some white oak dried sufficiently. White oak is a slow drying wood, I need to be patient, most of it was milled last year. Total time was surprising to me, it went quicker than I thought it would. I was at 59.5 last post. This post added 3 hrs for all the sanding/wetting/resanding/staining/resanding. Applying the finish of all 5 coats was time consuming also, another 2 hrs. So my total time start to finish was 64.9 hrs, time well spent in my book!!!!
  22. 13 points
    Been working as a Christmas Elf for the past few weeks, trying to think up some simple gifts. Made some candleholders, a few bigger pieces of furniture, some boxes based on @gee-dub continuous grain boxes, great link here... But @Gary Beasley got me thinking when he was begging for slabs from @Spanky to make some bowls. Well I'm not much of a bowl turner, but with the development of my sculpting skills I thought this might be a great gift idea. Went out to my drying piles where slabs hold down the roofing, lean against the back of a drying shed, and a few extra ones are lying around waiting to be chainsawed into fire wood. I grabbed a walnut and cherry slab along with a hunk of paulownia. After knocking off all the bark I cut the slabs into chunks and jointed/planed to thickness. The thickness was dependent on the usable wood in the hunk. Then I drew random bowl shapes onto the hunks, avoiding cracks and defects. Once again the wood dictated the shape I drew. Now it was outside my shop where I completed aggressive wood removal with the angle grinder. After a few days and some sanding, scraping and anything I had to smooth the bowl, I had 10 great looking organic shaped bowls. All the slabs were a few years old and dry, hoping no cracks develop but we'll soon find out. Here are what I saved from the fireplace; Second batch; Not bad for a few days of grinding and shaping. Thanks for looking.
  23. 13 points
    I made this for my niece's new baby boy. Just a small box from Wenge and Oak. I was trying to come up with something a little different for a handle on the lid... his name is Noah.
  24. 12 points
    Made this one out of Red Gum for the granddaughter, hidden behind the drawer is a musical movement that starts and stops when the drawer is opened, the movement is from http://www.themusichouse.com , if you haven't had a chance to make a music box these are the best people to deal with, awesome folks and a wide selection of movements. not continuous grain all around just 3 corners, the wood is a little thick for my taste but this stuff warps pretty easy and i was getting some bad chip out on the planer so i quit while i was ahead. the drawer box is Sapele, finish is ARS, 3 coats, as always thanks for looking folks, comments-questions are welcome, a special thanks to @Coop for setting me straight on the hinges, these look much better than what i had been doing, just messing with you coop but thanks, i re-learned how to cut mortices with a chisel
  25. 12 points
    Sandy listens to Ray Comfort and Kirk Cameron (www.livingwaters.com) sharing the Gospel every Saturday morning on YouTube while she makes our salads for the week so I made a passive speaker for her iPhone (and for her birthday). Curly Maple, Gaboon Ebony, and Curly Redwood, French polish finish. The difference in sound is very obvious - it’s richer, more balanced, and a little louder. Cold bending the Curly Redwood; I resawed to the point I needed and then soaked it in hot water. After three times and bending successfully more each time I cut the pieces I needed and then glued them together. Fitting the curved deflector; the square is just a prop to hold the deflector in place for the photo. Gaboon Ebony phone support - Finished passive speaker - Enjoy! David
  26. 12 points
    I posted a few photos of this project in progress in the What did you do today thread, but thought I'd post a few of the finished piece here. The table top is a veneered (shop sawn) mesquite breadboard with ebony accents. I made it first so that the finish could have a long cure time while I built the base. Once that was done I started on the base while I waited for the leather straps to come. I did all the M&T joinery on the PantoRouter - made very quick work of it and very accurate. Then it was on to the drawer box and assembly. Again, dovetails and box joints were done on the PantoRouter. Once the leather came in I did the mortises for the straps to pass through and mounted the drawer box with a single spreader bar spanning between the two top stretchers right in the center to keep the sides from collapsing inward from the weight of the drawer box. The superb leatherwork is by Jason at Texas Heritage @txheritage to match the leather on the Roorkee chair I made last year. I did a little ebony stringing on the drawer fronts to tie everything together. The ¼" solid ebony drawbore dowels were made on the PantoRouter. Have I mentioned how much I like that thing? The finish is Osmo PolyX. I don't know about others, but every time I begin a new project I have in the back of my mind the idea of really trying to make zero mistakes, which never happens, of course. On this project I believe I cut enough wood to make three coffee tables. But in the end, I'm happy with it!
  27. 12 points
    Today this flew into the shop
  28. 12 points
    Speaking of projects to make the wife happy, I finished up the crown molding on our first floor yesterday. Had a bit of a break since I started since we had our deck built in the middle. Old deck New deck
  29. 12 points
    OK, I love project journals, and now that I've had to close my dental office for the unforseen future, I'd thought I'd contribute to the forum again with a build. This has been a build on my list for a while. Sort of been putting it off since it's a big build, over 11 feet long. Had to build a plywood benchtop to go over my work bench and a lot of prep work needed to get the frame correct. Hopefully when this whole thing is over I'll get a chance to enjoy this build. I'll be using red cedar and paulownia for this build. The frame is made from 1/4" ply. I've had the pattern printed for a while. Started with the frame cut out. Feet were included in the pattern to suport the skeleton until the top deck is glued on. Here's a pick of the frame without the cross pieces, all the vertical lines on the pattern are where the cross pieces will be placed; Cross pieces cut and fitted to the spline; This build should go pretty quickly since I'm sequestered at home and can really focus. Next steps are to cut notches into the corners of the cross members and add strips to the frame for added gluing surface. Thanks for looking.
  30. 12 points
    Got a call from the camera store that I built the lens case for (two years ago). He wants 3 more.
  31. 12 points
    I started this Morris Chair project about 3 weeks back. I wasn't really planning on doing a detailed journal, but I have been taking photos along the way and thought I would share them here. I am making this out of Sapele. When I first started thinking about this project 3 or 4 years back I was planning on doing it in Quarter Sawn White Oak but for some reason the lumber yards around here aren't carrying much 8/4 inventory. They are nice enough to offer to order what I need but this does give me an opportunity to select my pieces. I have done some other projects in Sapele and have really enjoyed it and I think this will end up looking good. Once I got the initial dimensions down I haven't used the guild plans much, I did how ever watch the videos a few times so I guess it all the same. I am going with a little more traditional thinking in what I do so I am not tapering the legs or doing the curved feature on the bottom side of ht topside rails or the top of the bottom rails and at this time I am planning of going with the straight side pieces for the back rest. This picture below was the inspiration for my design. I saw these in Crater Lake Lodge in Oregon a few years ago They have about 15 of these that were made in the early 1900's These first picture are after a lot of the basic stuff was done. The parts are littered with my chalk and blue tape notations. I used a veneer to cover the glue line on the legs it's just a fuzz of 1/16 inch thick. This picture was before anything was sanded. After this I took it apart and numbered things in inconspicuously located spots like inside the mortise and on the tenons. Then I worked on a detail for the bottom of the bottom rails, I kind of stole or borrowed this design from Mick's chair. I also did a cut out detail in some of the slats. At this point I sanded everything to 150, I will do 180 once I am done "banging" things up and before the glue up. Everything sanded and stacked on the cart. Before I started sanding the other things I got my first arm glued up and in the bending form. I was hoping to stay away from urea and formaldehyde in the glue I used for this so I was looking around at information on the internet, then while listening to one of Phillip Morley's podcast, he mentioned that he used Unibond One for veneer work and he was real happy with it and it doesn't contain anything that makes you worry. Well now I am telling you I am REAL happy with Unibond One. It did a great job, I had just a strong 1/16 worth of spring back and my glue lines are non existent, I am just real pleased with how they came out. I was prepared to do an edge veneer on the arms to hide glue lines if I had to but no need now. Close up of the arm sitting arch up on my saw table. Both arms all cleaned up and cut to size.
  32. 12 points
    For those of us that do believe, I wish each and everyone of you a very Merry Christmas!!! For those of you that are unsure, to you I hope the holiday off finds you well and happy.!
  33. 12 points
    Just spent a very enjoyable few hours with @Ronn W when he stopped by on his way to Marc Adams woodworking school in Indiana. A great bowl of chili and some homemade sourdough bread with cupcakes for desert. Lots of great conversation covering all topics but mostly woodworking, thanks for coming by Ronn it was a great time and good to see you again.
  34. 12 points
    Been busy on this but haven't updated because I've been too busy to transfer images and what not. This will be a longer post. I also missed some picture so sorry if it's word heavy and not picture heavy. So i got the sides cut and sanded a while ago, then i got an order for 8 of those game boards i make so i dropped everything and batched those out. I spray them with the HVLP and i HATE doing that in my shop. Coming back to the table I needed to get a top and bottom rail for the ends and make a way to hold everything in the shape that i want it to. The sides are like an accordion so if you just let them go the snap back. I remember the trick from the Morris chair build where Marc makes a groove in the side tails and fills in the gaps with pieces of wood. During my build I took that one step further and cut a gap between the two pieces and used that so the grain match would be better. I did the exact same thing here. The sides ended up being 1/2" thick and instead of tring to dial in a dado stack perfectly to a random dimension I grabbed the Kerf master and had a perfect dado the first try. So i took the rails and got groovy. Then i needed to prep the stock that would act as a space and make the rails look a bit better. I used the planer to get close and then nailed the fit with my hand plane. To cut the strips I used my miter gauge on the table saw. With a ZCI on both the gauge and the throat plate it made this small work easy. I made all but one of the cuts to a dimension. For the last cut I put everthing together and used the piece to mark the exact length for the final cut. This way if my measurements were slightly off i wouldn't get a huge gap. I still got a little gap but it's from some extra sanding i did after the fact. Getting the spacing set and gluing the parts in was VERY tricky but i managed it. There is no trick or easy way to do it. You just have to take your time and make sure to keep your parts organized. I used numbers and letters on various parts so nothing could get mixed up. I had the internal pieces a bit proud of the surface to allow some fitment and figured i could just flush them up after the fact. To flush them up I just ran the piece through the table saw leaving a hair extra and then finished everything with the smoothing plane. When I finished the first one I noticed that there were some gaps on the side. I wasn't totally thrilled with this but I'm too far along now. So i used a clamp on the sides to squeeze the grove together. The following pieces the gaps disappeared. I guess the side was just a bit to thin. In the following picture you can see how well the rain matches up. By now I had to think about Joinery. I intended the sides to be the perfect width to allow for good space around a domino but still be nice and petite looking. Turns out I didn't account for the grove for the decorative side. I had to put everything together and plunge the mortise with the decorative sides in place. There isn't a ton of extra room around the mortise but everything ended up fitting ok. I took extra care to make sure the locations were nailed as i won't be able to use a wider mortise on the mating side as the shoulder won't cover it up. With the joiner done i could do a test fit of the sides. Now that the joiner is done it's time to do details. I didn't take pictures of this but that's ok it's pretty mundane. I wanted the main long rails to have a design similar to the sides so i used a drawing bow and tried to replicate that as best possible. I think it turned out well, subtle, but well. I cut to the line on the bandsaw and cleaned up with a spoke shave. I have been getting better with the spoke shave and am able to get a near surface ready finish with it. I'm not there yet but I've been able to remove most chatter marks with 120 grit instead of needing to really go at it with 80 grit. I want to have a lower stretcher like most of the furniture in the room. it does 2 jobs: 1. I like the look of it 2. it adds a bit of strength to the piece and a bit of piece of mind that i can use it as a ladder when i need to.... . I wanted to use some thicker materiel but didn't want the look of thick material. I knew this would be low to the ground so I'm using a trick of the eye. I put a pencil 1/4" up from the bottom and 3/4" in from the sides and used my hand plane to connect the 2 lines making a 20 degree ish chamfer on the bottom. The picture above shows the lines but they may be hard to see. I did a full dry assembly and something was off. I didn't like the curves and delicate look of the whole project and the contrast of the square plain legs. So i grabbed the french curve and put a decorate foot on the bottom of each leg. Again I didn't take pictures of this but it was as simple as cut the line and clean up with a spoke shave. Assembly!!! The ling sides i wanted glued to the legs. This was more tricky than i thought with the weird decorative sides. I ended up having to wedge some stuff in there to be able to throw a clamp on. You can see the sand paper and it's hard to make out but i used the french curve and my paloni pocket ruler on the left side. That ruler is SUPER useful! Oh as usual prior to assembly i did my usual sanding to #4 grit. If you are unfamiliar with #4 grit, it's 3 passes with a smoothing plane and your done cause sanding sucks. Tonight was coat 1 of finish. When i get this fully done I'll take some pictures of the room with the tables and I'll take this table outside and get some good pictures with a less busy background. It's HARD to see the details with all that clutter behind the image, my apologies.
  35. 12 points
    We have a new addition to the family! I don't know about you guys, but the drive home from the hospital is nerve wracking. I don't think I exhaled for two hours. Gotta say though, SCM knows how to build a car seat! Once we got it home I could breathe a sigh of relief. A 765 lb baby is not easy to handle. 848 lbs in its car seat! They're so cute when they sleep. Whoa! Pulled herself right up! Settling right in! Beautiful baby if I do say so!
  36. 12 points
    Just completed this table/bookcase. Made from white oak. Was my first adventure in through tenons. Think they turned out pretty good. Finish was a challenge, tried some tinted shellac, and then bailed out on that. Went with just a oil based stain then some wipe on poly. This will go to the entry way at church to hold bulletins, hand outs and some books.
  37. 12 points
    Last week I got to fulfill something on my bucket list. I was able to spend a week taking a class with Chuck Bender working on a Massachusetts serpentine chest. Last August I was diagnosed with prostate cancer, and when the shock wore off, the only thing that I could think that I would like to do would be to take a woodworking class with a professional. Thankfully surgery went well, and after 2 check ups since, no more cancer. While I was home recuperating I stumbled upon Chucks blog and saw that he had moved back to Jim Thorpe Pa. and was offering classes. The minute I saw the picture of the chest I knew I wanted to take the class. Had to borrow from my 401k to swing it but having just hearing a doctor tell me I had cancer I figured I can't take it with me. Chuck is one of the nicest people I have met. Very patient teacher, great sense of humor. And oh, an amazingly talented woodworker. We weren't able to finish the chest in the 5 days and Chuck graciously offer for us to come back on a weekend in November so that he could help us finish. Thank goodness because I definitely don't have the skills yet to finish the chest on my own. Just kinda wanted to share as I felt like this was a big step forward in woodworking for me and this was the first forum. I ever participated in.
  38. 11 points
    A super bandsaw box tutorial, watched this and was making boxes in a flash. Great technique if you haven't seen it before. https://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/06/07/episode-1-introduction-make-beautiful-bandsawn-boxes I grabbed a few chunks of wood and instant boxes; Thanks for looking.
  39. 11 points
    Couple of LV packages came in mail today- My first Dovetail saw. A much better flush cut saw than my crappy Dewalt one. And, to add to the 3/8, 1/2 and 3/4 chisels I bought a month ago, finishing out the upgrade from my old Narex set. These are the PM-V11s.
  40. 11 points
    This project was a long time coming for me. Planned and designed for five years. Most of that was you know.. learning how to do woodworking. Later I'll build a cabinet that goes under the desk, very similar to the under workbench cabinet from the guild. I want everything to be easily movable and not be a six month or more project. This took me about a month and a half. First project from wood I dried myself. Dried outside for about 18 months, 2 months in the garage. Then I cut into rough leg blanks, discovered they were still 13% or so in the middle. They sat in the garage like this from late November until mid-March. (security cam, obviously shop is super clean ha!) I tried to lay everything out the best I could with decent grain matching, labeled everything. I don't think I ended up sticking to the labels. Used loose mortise and tenon to join the legs. I don't have the Domino XL, so I made everything the old fashioned way. Loose tenons are 4" long, 2" wide and 1 1/8" thick. Tapered bottom and top parts of legs. Top, ended up choosing the two widest of what I thought were bookmatched sets. Each were 12' long, 14-18" wide, 2" thick. These had a lot of huge nails in them. Ruined 2 bandsaw blades slabbing them. And made it so I only got 3 full length slabs. The twist was pretty bad and ultimately the bottom never ended up truly flat as I stopped once I reached 1 3/8" thick minimum. So if you were to look closely you'd see issues, but I was able to live with it. Threw a profile on the front. The entire desk was sanded to 180, finished with Rubio Monocoat and a coat of Rubio maintenance oil, pretty much following Marc's method. I chose this finish because I wanted something easily repairable. I figured it would stay perfect for about 10 mins, maybe even less, as knowing me, I'd mess it up bringing it in. I gotta say, I don't like the finish near as much as Arm r Seal. Both in look and feel. Maybe I did it wrong, but it just didn't feel near as smooth. You can see from the pictures that I ended up not getting a real bookmatch. I think what happened is the log was cut into lets say.. 12 2" slabs. The middle slabs couldn't be 12' long because we had to chainsaw out a giant patch of nails. So I ended up with a slab from early in the cuts, and one from late in the cuts. Enough had changed that they were no longer real good match. Also I couldn't cut out the sap in the middle without losing width I wanted. Attached the legs with shop made clips. Also set spacing with a sorta ladder shaped thing I made that fit into each leg. Final product, still some cords that I need to clean up.
  41. 11 points
    As I get older, I find my hands seem to disagree with what I want to do. They shake! Not a lot, but enough to, in some cases be nerve racking, and even at times a tad dangerous to my fingers. I have been using a chunk of scrap plywood with two pieces screwed at 45* to the table to cut splines for picture frames, boxes and any joint that brings end grain to end grain. Shaky hands do not offer a good solution to a quick made jig that by itself is shaky to begin with. No, my shaky hands and the shaky jig don't counter each other and make the movement solid. It exacerbates it, and makes it twice or more worse. You can guess that it was driving me to drink, and scaring the hell out of me from time to time. For those of you that don't know me, driving me to drink is a really short drive, closer to a walk, than a drive. I remembered, Dave, aka: treeslayer having made a jig for accurately cutting splines, but I couldn't find it in my search here. I did however remember a little about it. He had T-tracks to hold stops to control the placement of the piece to be splined, and it kept hands away from the saw blade. Which I definitively approve of, having lost a knuckle to a saw blade during a kick back. So, since I couldn't find Dave's, I proceeded to conjure up my own version. When mine was completed, I PM'ed Dave, and asked him about his. And I showed him mine. Great minds must really think alike, because when I saw his, they were so close in construction to each other, that my jaw dropped. Time for some Jack to toast great minds. Here's my version. Say what you will, I'm a big boy.
  42. 11 points
    I bought this #3 a long time ago put it in a drawer and never did anything with it. Well honestly at the time I bought 2 #3s (i still have the other one), and i took some parts and switched them around to make one more "authentic". This casting came with the stamp "DAMAGED" on it. I found that very interesting. I did some research before i bought it and from the research it sounds like it was a factory second that was sold to a Stanley employee. The handles that came on the casting were some bright orange home made looking things. I swapped them with the rosewood handles from the 2nd #3 I bought. I like to keep the work i do to the planes to a minimum. I don't really like to do the evaporust method as I find that it leaves an odd looking surface. So I cleaned up the sides and sole with some sand paper on my out feed table. It made a big mess. Though it was easy to clean up with some sandpaper on a sander. After the sand paper i further worked the surface with green scotchbrite, finishing with some polishing compound. I did a bit of work to the mating surface of the frog. It was VERY rough. Then i bought a new Hock o1 blade and got it tuned up. It takes a very nice shaving and the size is small but works for me. I'm excited to put it to use on a project. Figured I'd line up all my vintage planes on the aircraft carrier for a picture
  43. 11 points
    I'm used to being "dad"; the guy that my kids come to for help or advice. For the past few days they have been taking care of things, including me. I'm really proud of my kids.
  44. 11 points
    I've been away from the workshop for a month, travelling around a few cities in Austria and Germany, as well as Prague. It was a good trip, but it's great to be home. The current build was on hold. This is the entry hall table my niece asked me to build ... ... and this is where we left off last time - ready to fit the first corner ... Past builds: Part 1: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/EntryHallTableForANiece1.html Part 2: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/EntryHallTableForANiece2.html Today we shall put the complete case together. What I wish to focus on is the dovetailing. Not just any dovetailing, but mitred through dovetailing in unforgiving hardwood (here, Fiddleback Jarrah). Of all the commonly used dovetails, I consider the through dovetail more difficult than the half-blind dovetail. Why ... because two sides are exposed against the single face of the half-blind. In my opinion, by mitering the ends, the level of complexity is tripled .. at least. Not only are there three faces now, but each needs to be dimensioned perfectly, otherwise each is affected in turn. This is more difficult than a secret mitred dovetail, where mistakes may be hidden. I have posted before on building the mitred though dovetail, and it is not my intention to do this again. Instead, what I wish to show are the tuning tricks to get it right. This is the model of the tail- and pin boards … In a wide case, such as this, it is critical that the parts go together ideally off the saw or, at least, require minimal adjustment. The more adjustments one makes, the more the dovetails will look ragged. Tail boards are straightforward. Let’s consider this done. Once the transfer of tails to pins is completed, the vital area is sawing the vertical lines … well, perfectly vertical. I use blue tape in transferring the marks. The first saw cut is flat against the tape. Note that the harder the wood, the less compression there will be, and so the tail-pin fit needs to be spot on. Where you saw offers an opportunity for ensuring a good fit: if you hug the line (edge of the tape), you get a tight fit. If you encroach a smidgeon over the line, you loosen the fit slightly. Saw diagionally, using the vertical line as your target … Only then level the saw and complete the cut … I do not plan to discuss removing the waste. That was demonstrated in Part 2. So, the next important area is the mitre. These are scribed, and then I use a crosscut saw to remove the waste about 1mm above the line on both the tail- and pin boards … Now we are ready to test-fit the boards … Mmmm …. not a great fit … … even though the mitres at the sides are tight … The problem is that the mitres are fat, and the extra thickness is holding the boards apart … Even sawing to the lines here is likely to leave some fat, which is why it is a waste of energy to try and saw to the line in this instance. It needs to be pared away with a chisel, using a 45-degree fixture. As tempting and logical as it seems to pare straight down the guide … … what I experience is that the chisel will skip over the surface of the hard wood rather than digging in and cutting it away. What is more successful is to pare at an angle, and let the corner of the bevel catch the wood … This is what you are aiming for … Okay, we do this. And this is the result … Not bad. But not good enough. There is a slight gap at each side, quite fine, but evident close up. The source is traced to the mitre not being clean enough. It is like sharpening a blade – look for the light on the edge. If it is there, the blade is not sharp. If there is a slight amount of waste on the mitre, the case will not close up. To clear this, instead of a chisel – which is tricky to use for such a small amount – I choose to use a file. This file has the teeth on the sides ground off to create “safe” sides. Try again. The fit is now very good. I will stop there. So, this is the stage of the project: the case is completed. This is a dry fit … One end … The other … The waterfall can be seen, even without being smoothed and finished … Regards from Perth Derek
  45. 11 points
    Some final pictures now that I got it back from the upholsterer. First off, on the copper pins I used a product called Everbrite to protect from tarnish. I was doing some research on the internet regarding rattle can lacquer as a finish on these and ran across some information on this product. And just in case you need, they have a great customer service called with several questions and you could tell the person helping me new their stuff not just reading of an information sheet. Everbrite is a product that is used to do exactly what I wanted. It is use to protect things like weather vanes, metal cupolas, metal hoods over stoves and even things like copper jewelry. You can wipe it on, brush it on or even dip your item. It is self leveling and no bubbles, I noticed that even when you get a bubble in a few seconds it bursts and then levels, no sign of it. Really a top notch product in my book. Here is a few pictures of the seat cushion construction. I provided the wood frame. First they mounted the zig zag springs on the side of the frame that will be facing up. There is a bow to the springs, you can see that in the piece that is laying on the bench in the upper right corner of the picture. Next they tie the springs to keep them aligned and they also attach some leather tabs to the two outside row of springs to keep the whole spring system stable and not feeling like its swaying from side to side when you sit on it. Turns out these folks are just like us wood workers, sometimes they get so involved in what they are doing that they forget to take photos along the way. But the next thing they do is put some kind of heavy polyester material over the springs so the foam and batten doesn't abrade against the springs. This next picture shows the cushion after they put on the material looking at the bottom side. The only thing missing at this point is the black fabric that they use to seal the bottom side off. And the final fit. Here are some pictures of the final product. I asked them to leave the back rest cushion a couple of inches short of the top of the back rest so that you would see some of the wood of the top slate. The mohair fabric has sort of a chatoyance to it. This next picture give a good image of the color. Here are a couple of pictures of the copper pivot and adjustment pins. I am extremely happy with how the upholstery turned out and over all I am really happy with the whole chair and it was definitely a fun project with a handful of firsts for me. Thanks for following along.
  46. 11 points
    With the recent completion of the Guild miter station build, I'm stoked about the organization, cleanliness and general productivity of my shop. I sent emails out to my favorite woodworking companies - those with whom I've spent a good deal of money patronizing over the years. A small handful sent back meaningful (not from automated systems) replies. This post is a shout out to Whiteside - who graciously sent me a banner to hang in my new shop and a T-shirt in my size. Whiteside makes absolutely fantastic router bits and I was really pleased to see them so responsive to the me / part of the microcosm that uses their products. General comments on the Guild build This is my first time making actual cabinets and it was a huge confidence builder. I will definitely be doing more. I deleted part of the original plans as I had limited space. Still worked out really nicely. Took 5 sheets of plywood if you're trying to accomplish something similar. I used the table saw entirely to make the cabinet doors and would encourage all to do so - the method employed in the Guild build uses the Domino leaves "gaps" in the doors - the table saw method is easy and leaves no gaps. I left space between the signs, cabinets, etc for a set of upper cabinets to be built soon. Everything was finished with satin Arm-R-Seal Other than that, AMA (ask me anything)
  47. 11 points
    For those of you that know Lucy’s story my thanks again for your thoughts and prayers during that tough time. She’s 2 today! It will be a great party for sure.
  48. 11 points
    So the tables are DONE! I was going to do 4 coats of finish but the 3rd was so nice and smooth i decided to stop there. I took the table outside and got some better pictures so the details are easier to see. I'm really happy with how thin the lower rail looks. It's like 7/8" thick but looks like 1/2". I could probably stand on it. The table overall is VERY light weight. Which it should be given it's very small 8"x 30". Here it is in place. I need to make some new rear speakers to match the front ones. I also need to do some touchup work on the front speakers as the finish started to fail in a couple spots from water because plants. I took a few pictures of the all the other tables in the room. The duplicate table which was first is hidden under a mountain of game boards and tucked behind the morris chairs. The sub table is tucked in the corner and usually has a blanket basket pushed up against it. All you ever see is the top. Which is good because the base is not attractive, it's not bad either though just meh. My next project is going to be very obvious from the next picture. All of that nice furniture and our dining room chairs are cheap folding chairs....
  49. 11 points
    SCM S500P (MM20) Bandsaw Review On a warm midsummer day, standing in my shop and sipping a glass of chardonnay, my wife asked me what piece of equipment I wanted next. I did not hesitate nor falter; I did not waiver. “A heavy bandsaw for resawing.” Her response drifted down on the wings of angels, softly, melodically, beautifully. “I don’t know what that is, but you have a birthday coming up, why don’t you get it?” My dream machine happened to be on AWFS show special pricing, so I did. I felt that I had to do due diligence even though I knew my mind was set on the MM16 Minimax bandsaw from SCM. The through-the-years closest-thing-to-a-consensus was that it was THE bandsaw to have for resawing. SCM bandsaws, with the exception of the S45N, are made by Centauro in Italy. I’ve sold lot’s of them and my customers were, to a person, thrilled with them. I also looked hard at the Laguna LT18, Laguna 18BX (great bang for the buck!) and the Felder FB510 and FB610. All great saws, but I’m at the point where everything I buy, I buy for the last time and don’t look back. Disclaimer* - I sold SCMI (SCM), Laguna and Felder equipment early on in my career. Having settled on the MM16 I dug a little deeper online and decided that the 20” model was worth the difference due to the larger wheel diameter = longer blade life on wide resaw blades. Plus, 4” more resaw capacity should I ever need it. I called Sam Blasco of SCM/Minimax to get a quote. Sam is a terrific guy and a very straight shooter. I also checked online and ultimately ordered from Elite Metal Tools. Same price, but freight paid. SCM quotes FOB destination with “white glove” service, meaning that if there’s any damage in transit, SCM assumes full responsibility - at a $750 up-charge. For the difference I was willing to take the risk and the machine arrived in perfect condition, having been drop-shipped directly from SCM in GA in their “ark of the covenant” crating. Arrival Wow, this thing is heavy. By my best calculated guess, the crate had some 1200 - 1500 nails in it. Not exaggerating. The machine was blocked up solidly and wrapped to protect anything from shifting. 10 out of 10 on packaging. It took 3 of us two hours to unload it from the trailer, move it through the garage and into the shop. Unpacking It took an hour to remove the crate and stand it up. No problems. FWIW, it took another 2 hours to break the crate down for reuse and disposal. Assembly Nothing much to assemble. We hoisted it up off the pallet using the beams in my shop and a come-along. I installed the casters/mobility kit and leveling bolts, scooted it off the pallet, cleaned off the packing oil from the table and waited for my blades to arrive. I spent my time waiting for the blades to arrive tweaking little things that many would say shouldn’t have to be done, but that from experience I know still do need to be done. More on that below. Once UPS brought the blades I installed the 1” Lenox carbide tipped resaw blade and used it to adjust the 90 degree stop, set the blade guides, etc. I was surprised, albeit pleasantly surprised to see that the saw has Euro blade guides. Almost all of the info I had read in forums said SCM had switched to Carter guides. In fact, I almost ordered the bandsaw about a year ago and was told that they only shipped with Carter guides, so I held off to look into other saws. Not that Carter guides are poor guides, they’re not, but I prefer Euro style guides. I contacted Sam again. He said they switched back several years ago from Carter to Euro. Ready to Run I’ll break this review down into two main parts. Part 1 is the greatness of the machine and what makes me very glad that I bought it. Part 2 are those little annoyances that I’ve found in most (but not all) equipment I’ve owned that I will soon forget all about. Part 1 The saw is a beast. It’s almost scary in its capacity. It has just under 20” of resaw capacity and carries up to a 1 ¼” blade with a 4.8 Hp motor. With it running and the guides all the way up I just find myself thinking, “Don’t trip. Don’t trip.” The guide post elevation system is the best I’ve come across short of a motorized system. If I set the guides properly all the way at the top I can lower them down the full 20” and they don’t drift front to back or side to side at all once the post is locked. SCM uses a chain and sprocket mechanism that’s independent of the saw body. +1 The wheels are very well balanced and heavy, ½” thick cast iron. They power the blade through anything. Power - Holy crap. The brake is very responsive, all things considered. There’s an interconnect to the starter switch, so when pressed it cuts power to the saw. I don’t know what these wheels weigh, but they’re massive. Stops in 1-2 seconds. The blade guide telescoping cover is great. As mentioned above, the Euro guides are simple to set without tools. I’ve used lots of different guides over the years, but the side bearing Euro guides I’ve always found to be my preference. If it had come with Laguna style ceramic I’d probably be just as happy, though I’ve found those to be a little trickier to set. It feeds at 5000 feet per minute. That’s fast. It would be no problem to put a power feed on this machine. The cut quality with a high quality carbide tipped blade is superb. I would give it one pass through a sander before glueing a veneer down. There is no discernible drift with the 1” blade. SCM touts the industry-only triple-box-beam spine on this saw as being capable of very high blade tension, meaning it cuts straight. For what this saw is designed to do, it does a great job. One thing to keep in mind is that the minimum blade width (as shipped) is ¼”. Anything smaller requires retrofitting guide blocks in place of the Euro guides. Part 2 It seems there are almost always some little annoyances that you notice up front that, over time fade from memory. Here are mine. Mobility kit sucks on anything other than a flat, flat floor. The casters are too small in diameter for this size and weight of a machine. The J-bar is too light for this size machine. It won't fit through a door and weighs over 200 lbs. more than my Sawstop PCS. The casters on it are too close together and the whole thing feels like it will tip over if you turn it more than a few degrees. I bought a Bora PM-3500 mobile base since… The doors have to be open 180 degrees to get anything larger than a ¾” blade on. If you have the saw near a wall that’s a problem. They could easily move the hinges to the left an inch and make the doors an inch wider so that opening at 90 degrees would allow access. Solved by the Bora mobile base. Move the saw out from the wall to change blades. Deafening screech on startup, meaning the motor drive belt/pulley was slipping. I called SCM and was told to give it time to break in. New belt, etc. I did and it didn’t stop. I adjusted the belt tension and problem solved. Table edges were sharp. Took a file to them. Solved. Fence was out of perpendicularity to the table +/- 1/64” over 4”. Filed down the landing on the bottom of the fence. Solved. I’ve read other reviews that find fault with the dust collection. I’m pleasantly surprised that it is as efficient as it is. One complaint I’ve seen more than once is that dust floats down from above like snow. There are two ~2” diameter holes on top of the saw connected by a weldment for lifting the saw. Cover them up. Solved. If you’re in the market for a premium bandsaw that will resaw whatever you throw at it, this will. I’m very happy with this saw. * For those familiar with my background, you can skip this. For those who aren’t, I feel pretty qualified to submit this review, having spent my career in the woodworking machinery business, from supplying upscale hobby shops to multi-million dollar production equipment. I’ve also been an off and on (as life permitted) avid woodworking hobbyist for over 50 years.
  50. 11 points
    Finished up the Fremont File Cabinet this morning. More hours in it than I had anticipated, but I'm happy with the results and I learned a great deal. Thanks to Marc and Darrell for the great video and detailed Guild build!