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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/13/18 in all areas

  1. Can't figure where to put this, but it seems worthy of sharing. I often stick a brush in a jar with solvent while waiting for a finish coat to dry. Usually I shove a rag in around the brush, but in this case the nitrile glove was what I found nearby. It fits over the brush handle. (Bonus tip: I cover my jar label with packing tape to protect it from solvents.)
    6 points
  2. This afternoon, I met with some clients of mine from some years past. I had worked on a museum house for them, and now they want to do some rearranging of the walls in the basement, and kitchen. They only use that space for a couple of fundraisers they have every year, and want to make the flow of people through it more efficient. Nothing down on that level is original to the house, but has modern bathrooms, and kitchen, so it won't matter a bit to change it. So, all it requires is tearing out some walls, and rebuilding. It's on a brick floor, and the walls will be masonry, with plaster-nothing we can't handle. When we started discussing me getting paid, I asked if they still had my bank account numbers. They said they did, but now, instead of going through the Treasurer, they had an accountant that was going to draft their account directly into mine, and they had already set it up. I said, "Life's Been Good.", but no one understood, and a couple made some comment about how they had been very lucky, but I guess none of them ever did much listening to Joe Walsh.
    3 points
  3. This project represents several firsts for me - 1) First acoustic guitar from scratch. I've replaced tops, backs, bridges, saddles, nuts, done inlay, repairs, etc. but this is the first one from scratch - resawed the wood, bent the sides, etc. 2) First time to do a French polish from the start and not just a repair. 3) First time I've made this many mistakes in a project and kept going, trying to figure out how to successfully fix what I've done and trusting it's still going to work out ok. So here's the sanding tip I learned a long time ago and I have no idea if it's something I read, something I figured out, or even if it's common knowledge - It takes twice as long sanding with the next grit as you spent sanding the previous grit. What do I mean by that? If you're sanding a finish, or even bare wood, with say 220 grit and you move to 320 grit, then if you sanded for 5 minutes with 220 then it's going to take 10 minutes of sanding with 320 to remove all of the 220 grit scratches. Right now I'm wet sanding the guitar that has a very thin film of shellac and when I wet sand with 320 it takes no more than a minute to do the back twice. When I switch to 400 I sand for about 2 minutes although I don't time it. Basically I sand the back twice, wipe the slurry off, blow it dry to see if I have even coverage of sanding, and then switch to 400 and do the same thing. Only now with 400 I do the back about 4 times. When I switch to 500 I'll do it 8-10 times. When I get to 600 I'll be doing it at least 15 times. By the time I get to the 1200/1500/2000 I'll probably keep going until it looks right and then switch to Micromesh. I haven't made it past 500 yet because I keep seeing where I'm getting too close to burning through to the Mahogany so I've had to stop and shellac again several times. So when I get to the finer grits it's necessary to judge how much finish is left so I don't go through on the polishing later. Anyway, it's a sanding tip I've passed along to lots of folks so while I'm waiting on shellac to dry it seemed like a good time to post this (only takes a few minutes to dry before I can sand again). Wet sanding Fresh shellac David
    2 points
  4. I wanted to say this. This has been a fascinating build to watch.
    2 points
  5. I was in two minds whether to post this, but since the method is a practice, it would be great to get feedback, since the strategy I have come up with is complex. Can you do this another way? Each row has 4 drawers, and these will be shaped to match the bow across the chest. At the start, the drawer fronts are to be left straight. This maintains the reference sides. The ends of each drawer front have been bevelled to match fit the bow of each drawer blade. This is a fitted (practice) drawer front (posted last time) .. The drawer side has been dovetailed to the obtuse angled side (again, details in my previous post: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/ApothecaryChestWeekend8.html) ... The need now is to dovetail the acute angle ... This is where it gets interesting. It you look at the lines drawn on the drawer side, if made coplanar with the drawer front, the dovetails will need to me cut at an angle. That is much too complicated, and likely to be a poor fit. Then, if the baseline is cut square (as usual), the dovetail will end up in the centre of the side (and not extending up from edge of the board). The only way I could come up with for a fit that simplified the tail board was to rebate the pin board, so .... The rebate needs to be as deep as the drawer side (for a flush fit), and square to the side (so the baseline of the tail board fits flush). The first step is to mark the baseline ... On the piece above, you can also see the rebate markings. The rebate is now cut parallel to the side ... Remove some of the waste with a chisel ... Now that rebate needed to be both straight and flat. It needs to be an equal depth along its length. It could have been chiselled, but that is less efficient. A shoulder plane as this would not ensure a square shoulder without extra work to create an absolutely square edge for a tight fit. In the end I came up with this idea to plane it using a LN Edge Plane. A spacer was attached to plane to the 1/4" depth ... The finish was spot on ... Transferring The rear of the tail board, with blue tape used to create a fence ... Tails on pins ... The socket shoulders are deepened to create a socket that undercuts the baseline .. Because the angle was so difficult to chisel, a trimmer router was used to remove most of the waste ... ... before the remainder was removed ... Coming together The fit ... The angle ... This is a rough idea of what it will look like once the drawer front is shaped ... The two sides that must be made for all drawers ... Regards from Perth Derek
    2 points
  6. Finally got back in the swing of things. The other day the Bosch cordless 12v trim router was discussed. I used my little 12v sabersaw to cut out for the junction box for the light fixture at the top of the arch. I am so glad to get both arches glued up. Getting the joints tight and everything even was far tougher than I ever imagined. I got the face frames built for the base cabinets and started dry assembly of the base cabinets today. At least I'm back on a roll.
    2 points
  7. Yes I am building a bench and yes it is going to be out of pine You will say it won't last and your right .I just turned seventy and I'm not going to last much longer so I think the bench will out last me. I have another bench also in my shop that I will beat on this will be used mostly for hand work .I have looked at a lot of builds and took idea's from some and have incorporated some of my own no plans just flying by the seat of my pants .Its been fun so far I have the top almost ready to install will need some help with that its quite heavy.I have seen some of the benches on here and the workmanship is just outstanding .I don't think I am to that level and will probably never get there .I am open to all critiques .Thanks for looking
    1 point
  8. An edge glued solid wood top would be best supported by legs connected by aprons. Make sure to allow for wood movement when you mount the top. Underlayment is a bad idea.
    1 point
  9. Burgers with Naturiffic W-Salt. The cast iron insert for the Weber Kettle really lets you get a nice crust. These were good on the Hawaiian Sweet Buns.
    1 point
  10. Only thing left is prepping for the upholstery and final finish coats once it comes back from them. And making the pins. I apologize for not doing a better job of journaling. I find myself taking plenty of photos but not doing anything with them. I'll try to put together a retro journal of this build. I started this back in October, but got waylaid by the wife's health issues and the CNC class in the spring. Mesquite, turquoise, ebony plugs with Osmo PolyX Hard Wax Oil Finish.
    1 point
  11. Accuracy! Rarely do miter saws give you 100% accuracy. A table saw with a miter or crosscut sled properly tuned, gives you way better accuracy. And it's what you need for "fine woodworking". If your just making "stuff" a miter saw will do what you need.
    1 point
  12. I've had a lot of people tell me this over the years. I've recently called on 3-4 2wd ford rangers from 2009-2011 they all were in the $8-10k range under 100k miles. All of them sold in hours. Which is why I got frustrated and ordered brand new. The Rangers were 15k brand new 8-10 years ago so 5-7k in depreciation. Because everyone thinks no one wants these pickups it creates a void and when the handful of nice ones that do exist pop up they sell FAST. Nice is the key word. There are a ton of junkers out there that are understandable because well they are junkers not because they are 2wd. Your right though i have no plans to ever try and resell it. With the 3,500 lbs tow rating I don't see myself ever needing more. 3,500 lbs is more than any boat or camper I'd ever buy would require. 3,500 lbs of wood is a LOT of wood, it's only slightly behind the Dakota Cremona uses. Not trying to make an argument I like the conversation. I honestly just wanted a cheap 3 pedal utility vehicle that is still kind of nice. Used market was moving fast and wasn't that much more affordable long term. If i liked Toyota they sell quite a few 3 pedal pickups and are the only brand that isn't afraid to mate a 4wd system to a manual transmission. Their fuel mileage is just awful.
    1 point
  13. Its a lot of extra work but you won't start cutting corners now ! It takes a great deal of focus and some test/ practice to figure out the procedure you are going to follow then work your way through all 24 drawers. The thing I find intimidating is sequence matched fronts means at least 4 fronts to redo if a mistake ruins a front. I always try to have an extra section of matching wood as a precaution if possible.
    1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. Yeah, your vision is somewhat limited Coop. Small squares are good for framing as tolerances are somewhat more forgiving. People want bigger squares for a couple of other things (right or wrong.) Big squares help with tool setup and alignment sometimes. MFT and table saw both feature heavily in that conversation. Bigger squares also give a longer registration surface when checking large cases for square. I think that is something missed in the discussion quite often. Just like using a long straight edge to span the cutter head and check jointer tables to make them coplaner, sometimes you want a bigger square to span across curves or mortises. I don’t want to step into the value argument. I simply see some desire for bigger at times, and no need for it for vast amounts of other time.
    1 point
  16. Awesome work as usual Steve. Absolutely pro work!
    1 point
  17. Back to the orig topic and away from the tariffs. I’m sure they are there for a reason and as many times as I’ve had my hands slapped on here, I darn sure don’t want to come close to that line, much less cross it. So, a framing square is good and a square framing square is even better. And this is my opinion only but, now that you have drawn this extremely square line, what the heck are you going to do with it? Try to follow it with your circ saw and cut a perfect cut? Or maybe drag the Festool panel cutter, or whatever they call it and override the initial line as Festool rules. Or like me, you have a half ass straight line, cut with the circ saw, that edge against the ts fence and cut proud of the line. Rinse and repeat until you have your final dimension. Framing squares are meant to be used for framers that put 2x’s in the air or to cut tails off of rafters. Rant over.
    1 point
  18. Now ain’t you something! Cool idea!
    1 point
  19. I still say Yes Ma'am to women half my age, which sometimes ends up in a fun exchange. My Mother still says Ma'am, and Sir to everyone. Someone responded jokingly that "didn't she know she should only use those titles to people older than her?" She said she didn't remember the last time she'd talked to anyone older than she was, and she has a good memory (better than mine). She's 102.
    1 point
  20. I have a cheap "square" that I came to realize isn't square. I replaced it with a cheap square that is square (as near as I can judge). I don't need, and would not willingly pay for, accuracy beyond what I can see with a visual check.
    1 point
  21. I think it needs taken in the context of application. A machinist needs dead square within a tight tolerance. I've never needed to see if my cabinet sides are square within .0002". It's marketing. Making people who don't need the product think it solves a problem they don't have. A Square that "isn't square enough"
    1 point
  22. I get my framing squares from the Homecenter, those unbranded ones made from steel with no scales. I check for squareness in situ, before buying. The main reason being that I don't need them for precision work, I'd rather offset my lines from the sides or use a t-square/combination square if I absolutely have to. So I wouldn't even pay for the Chappell one, those squares are not an important part of my workflow.
    1 point
  23. Agree about the horrible plastic cladding. Mine has no lower cladding, just the 'rim' around the bed and back of the cab. I really wish GM would bring the Avalanche back to production. It isn't right for everyone, but it meets my needs better than any vehicle I have ever driven. Little-known feature: the bed sidewalls have storage built in. Most folks don't realize that the plastic-lined storage boxes have drain ports, so they can be filled with ice and used as beverage coolers!
    1 point
  24. Thanks, folks. I do think attention to detail steps it up a bit. I get razzed for it by my wife and even a few fellow woodworkers. But I had to laugh after reading the comments about it. In focusing so much on details, I forgot to put on the corbels. Details. I keep a white board in the shop and tend to look at it and update it while I have coffee in the morning. Completely left the corbels off the list, so it didn't get done. I've since gone back and put them on, albeit with a little more work than it otherwise would have been. Since I already had the first coat of finish on I had to carefully scrape off enough to get a glue bond, but went one step further and put in dominoes just for insurance. Details.
    1 point
  25. I know I'm Old but don't call me sir Makes me feel like I am really old Thanks for the compliment much appreciated
    1 point
  26. I think you sell yourself short sir! That looks damn fine!
    1 point
  27. Got all of the panels glued up, and used the track saw to cut the top, middle, and bottom layers to the exact same size & shape. Double sided tape stuck 'em together, then the track saw had juuuuuuuuust enough depth of cut in order to do all 3 layers at once. Brought them up to the room where it'll live and made sure that I had the angle right- like anything in a house, of course it's not 45 degrees to the floor boards or the adjacent wall... it's 47.6 degrees. That's why we build custom furniture though, I guess! Now I have to figure out joinery; the right side and the shelf are pretty easy, but the left side will be interesting. Since the left panel is at a 45-ish degree angle to the top, middle and bottom- I have to account for SOME wood movement... half as much as a perpendicular intersection, but I still have to do it. I may do a sliding dovetail, but I am worried about the strength of the outer piece- I'll have to do some careful examination of the size of the router bit I have, with the thickness of each panel, to see what that'll actually look like once it is cut. I guess this doesn't need to be super strong; it's a media console tucked in the corner of a room, it's not a chair or anything. The most stress it'll undergo will just be if I slide it in and out to mess with cabling in the back.
    1 point
  28. I must assume that the ability to do that must come from having a much better brain than mine.
    1 point
  29. There is plenty of "quiet cunning" involved before any machine is ever turned on. If you have to tell someone that some part of the process is all hand done, it doesn't matter to anyone, beyond the maker, whether it is or not. I tell people, all the time, that I can do anything that I do, on an old house, the way it was done originally, with the same hand tools, or I can do it for about 1/5 of that cost only doing the part that you see by hand, and saving time and money with modern tools. So far, I have not had the first client willing to pay 5 times the price to have the whole process done by hand.
    1 point