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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/27/18 in all areas

  1. I promised to post pics of table results to "To stain or not to stain". Here are the results". What do you guys think I did? Here's a reminder of the before. It had bad water stains.
    5 points
  2. Two more small cabinets.
    4 points
  3. Small update... got the boards for the top milled. May get to some of the joinery today, we’ll see. I may pour a bit of epoxy to fill knots, nail hole on the underside of one of the boards, etc. I like the boards, though- this should work well.
    3 points
  4. 3 points
  5. This is kind of how I feel about using my leg vise too. She stood there and cranked it in and out for a solid 15 minutes.
    3 points
  6. I thought Id post some things I been doing now and then. Its not always what I like but its what they ask for. The small cabinet was made for the wall but they wanted a ply top on it. The large cabinet was a open book case. The cabinets I had made two years ago but the doors are new and that's why the color doesn't match. The walnut was used to make a simple display case. I hadn't installed the removable back yet. Thanks for looking.
    2 points
  7. The design was inspired by the work of the Greenes with some additional inspiration from some of Darrell Peart’s creations. I combined the elements of various pieces to get a look that I like. Like every project I learned a lot in the process. I found some techniques that I did and didn’t like. I spent a good amount of time building jigs with the thought that I might eventually try to sell one. One of the jigs allowed me to make the ebony plugs on the router table which helped speed things up a lot. In spite of a few mistakes, I am thrilled with the results. My biggest area of improvement is finishing. I won’t be build another piece this size without an HVLP. The desk is made from African Mahogany with the exception of the plugs that are made from Ebony. The finish is General Finishes water based dye stain with an Arm-R-Seal topcoat. Andy
    1 point
  8. Been a few weeks, but finally got my new jointer calibrated and wired up. I was waiting on a 10hp VFD to get here to power the machine, which accounted for most of the delay. I previously had a 12” grizzly that was a fantastic machine, but I always had my eye on the used market waiting for the right 16” machine to come around to upgrade to. I’m in a basement, so things are tight and 16” is just about the biggest machine I could get. I know everyone says an 8” jointer will cover most of your needs, but I found my 12” machine to be lacking more than I’d like. Maybe I’m lucky with my lumber supplier, but boards wider than 11.5” aren’t incredibly rare. Anyways, I figured 16” would handle 99% of my needs and waited and waited for the right one to come around. By “right one”, I mean something preferably European with less than a 9hp motor and either an insert head or a tersa head. I’m running my shop off a 60amp subpanel, and 7.5hp plus my cyclone is just about the max I can run at once. I missed out on a fantastic buy in Arkansas and then another in Florida, when I finally read a listing in Long Island for a 16” machine with zero badging or branding. All I had to go off of was a serial number and a model number “PF-500”. I went round and round with the guy on price, while taking a gamble on the machine’s origins. Turns out the guy listed it incorrectly Like I inferred from the model number and this is a 500mm cutterhead. I was also happy to discover the cutterhead is a tersa like I guessed from one crappy photo. It was a bit of a calculated risk, but for about a grand I have a massive jointer...in my basement. I won’t bore everyone with the story of moving it, but it was hellish. Tool weighs about 1700-1800lbs. After having it in person, it is definitely Italian and from the late 80s. Oddly enough, just this week the identical machine popped up on woodweb for $5500. It is a cassedei, which leads me to guess this was produced by Griggio or SCM and then badged Griggio, Casadei, Paoloni, etc afterwards. This is my first experience with wiring a VFD as a phase converter, and I am a believer now. With this 10hp unit, the 3 phase motor produces its full power rating. Jack Forsberg sells a variety of units, and has a fellow Canadian walk you through the programming over the phone. I’m competent with working on machines and most electrical needs, but programming isn’t my thing. If you are thinking about converting a 3 phase tool, this process was dead simple. The guard that came with it was a segmented plywood POS, and I spent 45 mins yesterday morning making a plywood bridge guard for it. Eventually I might take the time to make a swing away segmented porkchop guard, but this guard works very well. Overall, it’s a bit of an oddball machine without a manufacturer label, being 500mm instead of the more common 510mm, shorter beds for a machine this size(100” long), and only a 5.5hp motor, but all these oddities made it a perfect fit for me. 118” jointer beds sound awesome, but I’m not in a 4,000 sqft space. Same goes for a 9hp motor. Im sure that is fantastic for taking full width deep cuts, but I can’t power that. I won’t say much about the performance of the machine, because I Have only surfaced about 50bdft of walnut so far. I snapped a pic of the grizzly as I was moving it, but I wish I had a side by side comparison.
    1 point
  9. Would depend on the size tip you have in your gun. Changing the tips is pretty cheap and easy tho. That said, I shoot WB with the tip that came in my sprayer so, chances are, you already have the tip you need.
    1 point
  10. Dining area needed a place for the coffee.. Wife picked up a big box store cabinet and did some custom painting on it. My job was the top. So, here comes a lot of walnut..
    1 point
  11. Another great video Kev! Not gonna lie though you thru me in the beginning I was like something is different...turns out you didn't have a cap on LOL
    1 point
  12. Mix it in a shallow container and you'll reduce the chance of a reaction. I was using a different brand of (thick) epoxy the other day and it was with a fast hardener. The instructions said a 15min working time with a 100g pot. I mixed up that amount but on a piece of ply and it was still workable an hour later.
    1 point
  13. That’s a neat deal Dave, glad you got to experience it!
    1 point
  14. Just finish the wood first then glue the glass into a rabbet with Lexcel clear caulk. I have the glass cut between 1/16 to 1/8 undersized and have the edge slightly sanded. Run a bead a couple of feet long then stop and smooth it with a finger dipped in mineral spirits. Use a glove if you live in California. Work quickly before it skins over. Might take a day or 3 to cure but it lasts for decades. I've been gluing glass into cabinet doors with Lexcel since the mid 70's .Around $9-10 a tube at Lowes or decent hardware stores. It dries hard enough to add rigidity to the case or door but remains slightly resilient even 25 years or more later. If you don't caulk before you put the glass in the rabbet it's not that hard to cut the caulk out if you need to replace a pane. If you caulk under & behind the glass it's quite difficult to get all the glass out without cutting yourself.( learned that the hard way ) I lay doors face down to let the caulk cure. You might want to use a few glaziers points to keep the glass in place if you do both sides at once I would use 1/2" ply for the back and add a strip of solid over the seam. A case that big needs a stiff back to prevent racking. Adjustable feet will let you level the case which helps the fit of the doors. Sagulator will help when sizing glass shelves too.
    1 point
  15. Sounds like a great idea!
    1 point
  16. I like it that the top is lighter. I think it looks very good.
    1 point
  17. For what it's worth here's what I did. I bought a bunch of old Stanley and Record planes. More than I needed, but if I were to do it again I would get 3 of them for bench planes. A #4, #5, and a #7. I would add a block plane to that. Yes, you will likely have to do some work to them. In that process you will learn how to set them up and how they work. I still use my set after many years. The newest one is from 1936 or so. The #5 I have set up the most crudely. It is my fore plane. Used for roughing out stock. The #7 is set up a better and is my jointing plane. The #4 is set up very well and is my smoothing plane and takes very fine shavings. I would love to go spend a thousand dollars on nice new Veritas or similar planes. But why? I have the #'s 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, got a block plane and a marking gauge in the deal all for $115 CDN. They work just fine for what I want without a huge layout of money. I could probably sell them for more than I paid for them, and I know how they work. It took a while to tune them up and I still experiment with them a bit ( lately I have changed the angle which I sharpen and I am slowly putting a camber on the #5). I know how they work and why. They are more difficult than buying a new bevel up plane for sure, but it's a learning experience that I find is a great part of the journey.
    1 point
  18. 1. You will find the tool just after you bought a replacement. 2. You will see tool #1while looking for tool #2. Then when you look for tool #1, you can't remember where you saw it. 3. You will buy a tool and later ask yourself why you bought it. 4. Your significant other will ask why you need all those tools. Your reply asks her why she needs all those shoes, dresses, and purses. You will then find yourself sleeping in the shop with all the tools for company. 5. You will eventually believe in the hereafter. This is when you walk into your shop and ask yourself, "Now what am I here after?"
    1 point
  19. So let me get this straight, because I am new to this. If I need a tool, I should pretend I just bought one and am looking for a place to store it so I can find the one I already have? This woodworking stuff is complicated!
    1 point
  20. LST (landing ship tank) USS 325 came to town this week, only one of its kind still operational, landed on Omaha beach D-Day +1, very cool.
    1 point
  21. Finished the Wishing Well for our daughters baby shower.
    1 point
  22. One more thing, and @Wimayo suggested it but I'd suggest ditching the dowels completely. They're unnecessary imo. Most yellow wood glue (like titebond) gives a bond when properly prepared that is stronger than the wood it is binding together. So if you were to glue up a panel and smash it face first on the edge of a cast iron table for instance, it won't the glue bond that breaks. It will be the wood. Try a glue up without dowels. If you still have the same problem you can rule them out as the culprit. One other thing that Wimayo said that I'll second is that a the jointer will usually give you a better glue line than your table saw blade will. Some premium blades do a great job (I use a Freud ultimate glue line ripping blade) but he's absolutely right that the jointer will typically give you the cleanest join.
    1 point
  23. Learn to turn, my brother! Learn to turn. It will make you a better woodworker. I am going to say this as respectfully as I can - try not to think of turning as different from your other areas of woodworking. Sure, it uses slightly different tools, but it involves: planning, preparation, execution, surface planing, detail work, joinery, finishing - and other aspects that are done in other non-turning avenues of woodworking. IOW, learning to turn will make you a better woodworker in all other areas. It shouldn't be thought of as an "either or", but more, as an extension of your woodworking. Plus, it's SUPER fun and you get the pleasure of finishing the project on the same day you start it! (Most of the time, anyway.) My advice: Pick yourself up a mini or midi lathe, a starter set of turning tools and a means of sharpening them. Turning will demand that you sharpen your tools with a frequency and sharpness that (probably) exceeds what you have had to do with chisels and plane irons in the past. This is such an important and fundamental core skill - and being proficient on a lathe will ensure that you are an equally proficient sharpener. And, again, you will be better for it! Take care
    1 point
  24. Cup hinges come 2 ways, knock in ( dowels are already mounted on the hinge) and screw in (no dowels). Hinge brand might affect the dowels. Die cast cups use a different dowel from the stamped steel cups (which have a countersink for the screw) . If you haven't discarded the old doors you can carefully cut around the dowels without hitting the plastic and pick at the MDF to free them undamaged. I think the hole is 8mm. Placement of the dowel holes in relation to the cup hole is critical. I often just use a Vix countersink bit to center a pilot hole for the screw. You can put a few drops of epoxy in the holes and after it's cured re-pilot. The epoxy soaked into the MDF will help prevent the screws from stripping out.
    1 point
  25. Make friends here: http://owwm.org
    1 point