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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/28/18 in all areas

  1. It has been one year to the day since I last was on this forum. I am sure there have been a lot of new members and things happen since then. I just thought I would put up a post to let everyone know where I've been and why I was absent for so long. Hopefully all the members I have known in the past are still here! One year ago today, I had an injury in the shop. I will spare you the details for now, but it ended up with me in the emergency room. I cut open my left thumb on the table saw, and required 12 stitches (6 inside and 6 outside). It scared the living hell out of me. The cut was in the pad of my left thumb, and did not severe any tendons, ligaments, or hit the bone. No surgery was required. I am a VERY safety conscious person, and doubly so in my shop. I have worked wood for 15 years without injury or incident, until this occurrence. It was, quite literally, 1 second of inattention and my thumb was cut open. I was out of the shop for 12 weeks as the thumb healed. My thumb has recovered, but I do have some nerve damage that affects the feeling along the scar line. The mental healing took much longer, and I feel now that I am ready to share my experience with you. After the incident, my wife was concerned about me and how this was affecting my outlook on my beloved craft. In the end, she bought me a Sawstop to help get me out of my funk and back to my passion. It's now in my shop, and I have been using it for 6 months. It's the 3 HP cabinet saw model, and its incredible. I'll post a review at a later date when I get back in the groove of posting again. In no way to I blame the table saw for my injury - it was 100% my own fault. Ironically, about 6 weeks after my injury I was contacted by a Woodworking magazine regarding a 2 page article I had written for them. I ended up getting my article published int the magazine (print), and have since written 4 more which will be published in 2019. The magazine is called "Canadian Woodworking and Home Improvement". It was a very proud moment for me, but was a little tarnished by the injury I had suffered. Regardless, it is nice to be back in "full swing" again. I'll be back to regular posting now, so catch me up on what you fellas have been up to! -pug
    11 points
  2. Hey everyone! Back from the dead. Here’s what I’ve been up to for the last three months or so! https://imgur.com/gallery/heMQGGJ It’s a sideboard that will serve as an entertainment center for a client. Solid cherry all over, with cherry veneer plywood for the shelves, back panel, and internal vertical components. The only screws in it are holding the ledger strips in place and fastening the top via figure-8 fasteners. I’m pretty happy with it!
    3 points
  3. That was fun. At least it would have been if it was thirty degrees warmer. It was really easy to drive. I took it super slow, but it drove very well. Guess what came with narrow pallet forks? I carried the crate lengthwise the whole way. I chopped off a few inches of 4x4 and it fit through the gate just fine. No real issues. The parking brake got stuck mid way when I stopped to check the clearance through the gate, twenty minutes and a call to the store later, I was told to reverse slightly while disengaging the brake. Bingo. This was a nice "little" machine that made the move almost stress and labor free. It struggled tilting the machine backward, wouldn't to as far as I'd had liked, so I chained the Hammer to the Bobcat. I was afraid to drive the heavy bobcat INTO the basement, so I placed the Hammer just inside, dropped it to the ground, then used the forks to push it in far enough to close the basement doors. Easy, and minimal damage to the yard
    3 points
  4. These are my first experience with green turning, and I'm really just winging it. I'm turning them to final size and letting them do their thing as they dry. I figure that I can flatten the bottom on the belt sander after they settle a bit. After just a couple days inside they developed a decent wobble. The bowl I turned tonight, and posted the initial picture of, is the smallest and thinnest walled one I have done. One of the logs I got had a big crack in it, presumably from when the tree fell. I was able to save a piece of it and this was the largest round I could get from it. I also decided to try making a tenon 'foot' for this one. I intentionally left it larger than I think looks proportional, knowing that I will need to flatten the bottom in a few days. Quarter for scale. And a pic of the three I have turned. The first two were completely turned on a faceplate, then I used a thin parting tool to remove the bowl from the faceplate and cut a slight hollow into the bottom. These live edge bowls have been making me be more patient to avoid losing chunks of the bark. The middle bowl above was the first I turned and I got too aggressive in removing the bulk (or too lazy to sharpen my gouge again) and lost some bark. I tried to find the piece to glue back on but couldn't. You can see a couple of the spots/lines of green-ish on the top bowl.
    3 points
  5. 7000 miles a year, that truck will last a long time at that rate with proper maintenance. That’s about what I put on mine, less on the wife’s car, I don’t have much reason to go out and mingle with the crazies.
    3 points
  6. Hit 100,000 miles on my 2004 truck today. It takes a while when you don't commute. Pulled over and to a pic of the moment.
    3 points
  7. I spent many years through high school and college looking at music stands. THIS is what I was used to! That looks like a helluva challenging project, looking forward to following along.
    3 points
  8. Sawstop Inline Router Table My wonderful wife asked me what I wanted for my birthday next week so I obliged with a list. She recognized the Sawstop name and ordered the 27” x 16” inline router table and dust box to replace my shop built router table I’ve been using for years. It arrived yesterday, so you know where I’ve been today. I’ll bore you with a little of my background. I’m retired from 30+ years in the woodworking machinery business, starting with the types of tools all of us here are familiar with - upscale hobbyist to small production shop woodworking stuff. From there I moved on to heavy industrial production machinery and finally to specializing in industrial CNC equipment before retiring a few years ago. I’ve also been a lifelong hobbyist. With that out of the way… Impressions I’ve said it here and other places, but I’ll say it again. I’ve never, ever seen a company do a better job of making it as easy as possible for a consumer to understand and assemble their product than Sawstop. Any machine, any level, and I’ve probably assembled many hundreds. From packaging to manuals, they do it right. Here’s an example. Four of the five boxes inside the large (very heavy duty) shipping box contained a note indicating that the manual was in a separate box. The manual was in the fifth box with the cast iron router table.The manual is 62 pages of photos with detailed explanations of what hardware to use where. Each bag was labelled with the assembly it went to. When I unpacked the router table itself I noticed what looked like a scratch in the cast iron. Sure enough, it was. Then I noticed that there was an identical scratch on the opposite edge - for lining up the fence to the center of the bit. Devil in the details. This thing is really, really solid, really well built, end to end. The surface is flat using a Starrett 36” straightedge. I could not see light below the edge. The fence body is a very heavy anodized extrusion with integral dust port, side to side adjustment and T-slots for accessories. They include (hard to describe) T-slot spacer shims that let you use the fence like a jointer by offsetting the right and left fence faces. The fence itself is perfect for a table saw installation. On and off takes seconds, 90 degrees square to the table with a Starrett combination square. The extrusion looks almost identical to the JessEm Mast-R-Fence II extrusion other than the anodizing color. It differs in the way the fence faces slide side to side in T-tracks on the Sawstop vs in slots in the extrusion itself on the JessEm. It also mounts directly to the table rather to the side tracks on the JessEm. The router mount plate has 10 (10!) leveling bolts with lock nuts for precisely adjusting it to the table surface. The legs seem significantly beefier than the legs that came with the saw. The leg mounting brackets definitely are. It includes a paddle switch that the router plugs into, as well as holders for the tools like insert ring wrenches, height adjustment tool, etc. Installation It took more time to remove the old router table than to install the new one. It took about 2 hours to assemble and install the new table. That included disconnecting the outfeed table, cleanup, etc. I installed the Sawstop router table (SSRT) on the right end of my Sawstop PCS, 36”. I did not install it in any of the 3 suggested ways covered in the manual. The 3 ways listed in the manual are to the left of the blade, to the right of the blade with an optional 10” cast iron insert or with a shop made spacer insert like the laminate covered one shipped with the saw. I chose to instead mount it directly to the right extension wing with no insert. I did it because the SSRT is just long enough (16”) to still support the fence at its full 36” width, AND it lets me avoid the dust pipe that drops at that exact 36” width (see photo) for the big majority of the work I do with the router table. I’m going to give this a shot and if I don’t like it I’ll add the insert back in. I got my saw before Sawstop took on the router table line, so the rails were never intended to support them. Because of this, Sawstop offers new rails that are drilled and countersunk for the SSRT and notched for the miter slots in the SSRT. My rails don’t line up. In the photos you can see that I notched my rails for my old table and that’s what I plan to do for the new one. I don’t see the need to buy new rails, especially if I keep the setup as it is. The only disappointment I have is really with myself for not thinking to ensure the dust box was big enough for my router. I chose to keep using my 3 ¼ Hp Triton router. It has an integral lift micro adjustment and has been great. The router is way too big for the box. I can barely get my hands inside and have to pull it out to adjust it. That said, the dust box is well worth the money with the right router/lift mechanism. It has dual sized ports for the fence dust collection and from the box, adjustable draft vent and a magnetic door latch, as well as a split port for running the router power cable to the switch. Well thought out and well executed! Oh well, now I know what to ask for for Christmas! The SSRT fits standard router table inserts like the Kreg phenolic I’ve used for years. Summary I wouldn't hesitate to recommend this table to my best friend!
    2 points
  9. For Coop, though I am not sure if they are in love or he just has an itch and she is about to call the reindeer cops.
    2 points
  10. Richard I just saw this thread, so I'm sorry for the late condolences. But they are heartfelt. God bless you and your family, and I know God blesses your wife, as she smiles constantly, buoyed by your unending love. Treeslayer just said it above so simply and well, a good woman is a gift, and God's greatest gift to a man. You have been blessed to have her in your life and she stays with you even after, which leaves a hollow space in the physical but still has a full and complete part of your heart, which we carry all our lives. Thank you for sharing. The woodwork was beautiful and I'm sure she appreciates it all the more because you and friends put your personal love and energy into it. David
    2 points
  11. Greiving is probably the the hardest thing we humans have to do. I lost my sister 23 years ago. It was 10 years before I could speak of it and 15 years before I could speak of it without crying. I think of her often, but I still keep her photographs in a safe place where I won't wander into them.
    2 points
  12. A good woman is a gift, I thank the Lord for mine every day, sitting in my favorite chair watching her decorate our Christmas tree, think of you every day Rick.
    2 points
  13. Looking good, 'Nut! 29 or 30" is a good table height. I made one 31.5" by accident (forgot to include the thickness of the top), and it was uncomfortably high for anyone under 6 feet tall.
    2 points
  14. It's been more than a month, and I can't stop the tears either. I love that woman.
    2 points
  15. I started out with milling the leg pieces. I have a top that is 2.5" tall and 8/4 milled to around 1.75" The bottom is 3" and 8/4. I really wanted the top arm to be a bit more delicate looking but after reviewing the design i decided it needed more meat to ensure that the tip doesn't break off. That will make sense later. Cut the through tenon with a router and a bearing guided bit. All that leaves is to square the corners Next i worked on laying out the curves that will be on the arms of the leg assembly. The main curve on the center piece is asymmetrical so i figured all of the curves should follow that style. I pulled out the fence curve things and finally decided on some lines that i liked. After i had one curve for the bottom and top (not pictured, I'll have to take a picture and add later) i used that curve to draw a line to cut to on the other leg assembly. after cutting and shaping the 2nd assembly i transferred the lines back to the other side of the first piece. When working with the french and asymmetrical curves it's hard to draw 2 identical compound curves so this was my method that wasn't making a template. All parts got a 1/4" round over. Through tenon was next. I used the dado stack to get close and then my favorite LN 140 to finesse the fit. I ran into an interesting problem though. What do you do when the tenon cheek is wider than your block plane? The answer was to use 2 block planes. The 140 has a nicker so if i were to clean the entire tenon with it i'd leave gouges everywhere. You can retract the nicker but that's a lot of wrk when you have to clean the 2 sides evenly. Ended up getting an awesome fit. Next up is to work on the extension pieces. It's an idea i got from @Chet on his dining table build. I am using the upper tresle arms to hold the extensions with a 3/4" deep groove. The top will float about the arms by around 1.25". So far all i've done is taken some redwood as test pieces to make sure my idea works. I want to have the slides as far towards the center as possible and leave more solid wood on the end so that there isn't as much drawer slide to see when the extension is out and it might possibly give the leaves more to rest on. All in all i think this idea will work out. I had to get over the idea that the drawer slides needed to be on the ends of the supports. Their location doesn't matter because the leaves and top are mounted to the wood pieces no the drawer slide. With the wood being the key it doesn't matter where the slide is located. Oh the reason for the title is i'm trying to have this complete for Christmas. I'm hosting my immediate family and don't have a table for our dining room currently. I should be able to complete the table with plenty of time to spare.
    1 point
  16. The design was inspired by the work of the Greenes with some additional inspiration from some of Darrell Peart’s creations. I combined the elements of various pieces to get a look that I like. Like every project I learned a lot in the process. I found some techniques that I did and didn’t like. I spent a good amount of time building jigs with the thought that I might eventually try to sell one. One of the jigs allowed me to make the ebony plugs on the router table which helped speed things up a lot. In spite of a few mistakes, I am thrilled with the results. My biggest area of improvement is finishing. I won’t be build another piece this size without an HVLP. The desk is made from African Mahogany with the exception of the plugs that are made from Ebony. The finish is General Finishes water based dye stain with an Arm-R-Seal topcoat. Andy
    1 point
  17. $110 well spent. The other ways might have worked but they would have been a lot less fun.
    1 point
  18. After all the talk about it, you did it the absolute best way! I knew nothing about that kind of Bobcat before, but now it's apparent that it's the right tool for the job for an old basement we have to clear, and dig out sometime in the future. I'm glad forks were available for it. I was worried about the crate, and a small bucket.
    1 point
  19. I try hard to be safe with the machines too and anybody that thinks it's impossible to sustain an injury is just kidding themselves. My encounter with a bandsaw blade was oddly enough April 1, 2017 but certainly not an April fools dealio. I escaped with 9 or 10 stitches on my pinky finger. I completely understand it taking a while to get the mojo for woodworking back. I don't remember how long I stayed out of the shop, but I do remember the first time I went back and made a cut and I t took a while after that before I started enjoying woodworking again. Even now I guess I am still somewhat paranoid or maybe before my accident I just thought I was being safety conscious. I do know with absolute certainty I never want to touch a blade again. Very glad you are doing well again.
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. Sorry, I was slacking at slacking at work.
    1 point
  22. Hard as a rock! Will make a good deck floor or outside furniture. Black Locust..
    1 point
  23. Looks like fun! Especially squeezing through the gate.
    1 point
  24. Welcome back young'un. I did a finger thingy last year. It's knida hard to get back into it. But I managed, and apparently you did to. So, good to hear from you.
    1 point
  25. Great to see you back Pug and all is well. I am looking forward to your contributions here again.
    1 point
  26. Oh man. I did a lot of growing up in the Ozarks. I've got much love for bug spray. And hatred for mosquitos!
    1 point
  27. Ahhhh! As my daughter would say! Just the right compromise. Thanks
    1 point
  28. Great to have you back. Lookin' forward to some Pug posts.
    1 point
  29. Rodg, welcome back! A woodworker will go a long way to get new toys and you are no exception ! Yes sir, you have a good wife! Look forward to your continued contributions.
    1 point
  30. Welcome back ! Glad you recovered fairly well. I had a tablesaw accident when I was in my late teens. Most guys I've seen with a shortened finger. I tried to split my pinkie finger up the middle. Still have a raised section in the fingernail that's 1/8 kerf wide. Every day afterwards my caution & safety efforts were greatly increased.
    1 point
  31. Sorry to hear about your experience but welcome back.
    1 point
  32. If I could “like” this a dozen times, I would. Well said by both you and Dave! I’ve met Rick personally more than once and the boy is no slouch. He has stamina and will pull thru with our help.
    1 point
  33. That's crazy detail! I don't have a CNC but I bet it makes inlays like mad
    1 point
  34. This is the finish that won the bake off. Super simple. Sand with 220 to open up the material a bit, flood with 1-1/2lb cut of clear dewaxed shellac so that is really soaks into the figure. I apply it with squirt bottle and follow with a pad in a circular motion to force the liquid deep. Sand with 320 and repeat, sand with 400. I will add a paste wax but, that is not present in the pics. The flash really kills the depth of the chatoyance but, you get the idea. This is just a random cutoff. I prepared the surface the same as the actual parts.
    1 point
  35. We had the same temperature in Chicago! Only the numbers were reversed.
    1 point
  36. The Bobcat should have no problem doing that .
    1 point
  37. Yup, it's only 36" wide, and it SHOULD be able to lift the Hammer above the fence as I drive through it. My emergency backup plan is to remove an 8' section of my fence.
    1 point
  38. Hold the press! I was thinking that larger pneumatic tires would get you over ground easier. Then I thought of either hand truck/dolly or wheelbarrow tires. Then thinking of wheelbarrow, why not? Two sets of these thru your crate/pallet, then strapped to the pallet. Excuse the non professional drawing.
    1 point
  39. You're braver than me if you tackle dining chairs. I have about as much desire to make dining chairs as I do to make kitchen cabinets. I dig the leg design of the table.
    1 point
  40. I once moved a whole wooden 10 x 10 shed on to a trailer using nothing but some 3/4" pipe, a car jack, a come along, and some boards. Being stubborn is a good thing some days.
    1 point
  41. The trailer jack idea is pretty genius I think. I reserved a Bobcat for tomorrow and am picking it up in the morning though. The price for a half day is reasonable, and it's the one option that will lend me other options if I get in a bind. The ground is frozen so the yard isn't in too much danger. Plus, it SHOULD make the process fun.
    1 point
  42. Great work as usual, you’re really cranking out the projects, I’m retired and couldn’t keep up with you. Chairs, how many? They are a challenge, thanks for taking us along for the ride
    1 point
  43. Wiha is having a sale on their web site right now, and has some bit sets on sale. If you need lots of one type of bit they have a bunch of 100 packs discounted by about 33%. I've got lots of their drivers and bit sets, and they are the best ones I've used. I just ordered a security bits set for use at work (working on laptop computers and other small devices).
    1 point
  44. 1"-2" pvc pipe? put a couple boards lengthwise under neath and roll it Neanderthal style? Kinda like this or this
    1 point
  45. Welcome to the forums! I assume you're wanting to know what height to set them at? For me, I try and set all my work surfaces at the same height as the table saw. Just makes managing long pieces easier when everything is the same height. A work bench where lots of hand tool work would be the exception as that should be based on your personal height.
    1 point
  46. A little more progress. Cut the curve on the top, faired it with a shave, cut the angled ends and then use the top as a template for the bottom. Roughed out part of the profile at the router table using a portion of a large roundover bit. And used a spoke shave to get it to where I want it. They will end up oriented like so. More to come.
    1 point
  47. As a ex tool pusher (salesman) , I could go on about driver bits for an hour but, just let me say...YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR. The difference between a #1 and a #2 Philips screw is hard to see with a naked eye BUT there is a big difference when you use the wrong screwdriver. You usually ruin one or the other, so if you are tearing up screw heads or breaking bits, switch to the other size bit to see if that makes a difference. AND THEN, there is a screw style called "Pozi-drive. At first glance they look like a standard Philips screw but, on closer inspection you will see THEY ARE NOT THE SAME. Where Philips screws have tapered surfaces in every direction, Pizi-drive are square on every surface of the slotted area. The Pozi-drive also have a small X across the drive slot area (and yes, the driver has provision for that X) One of the wrong drivers in either style will end in frustration and maybe a broken driver or ruined screws. Then, we could get into things like "Tamper Proof Torx" also but....Maybe another time.
    1 point
  48. I've tried to answer this a couple of times but, I keep coming off like a sanctimonious ass . What it boils down to is that as I have learned more, I have found that the acts that used to cause me a major pucker-factor have been replaced by safe ways of doing those things. Safe operational practices are a learned behavior that replaced my guns-a-blazin-get-'er-done approach of the past. If I am approaching an operation and I do not feel good about it, I back off and figure out why. Often a clamped-on auxiliary fence, guide, a feather board, some additional stock or tool support is the answer. In the grand scheme of getting from material selection to placing a new piece in its new home, the time spent to make sure you do those one or two operations safely is small potatoes.
    1 point