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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/28/18 in Posts

  1. It has been one year to the day since I last was on this forum. I am sure there have been a lot of new members and things happen since then. I just thought I would put up a post to let everyone know where I've been and why I was absent for so long. Hopefully all the members I have known in the past are still here! One year ago today, I had an injury in the shop. I will spare you the details for now, but it ended up with me in the emergency room. I cut open my left thumb on the table saw, and required 12 stitches (6 inside and 6 outside). It scared the living hell out of me. The cut was in
    11 points
  2. Hey everyone! Back from the dead. Here’s what I’ve been up to for the last three months or so! https://imgur.com/gallery/heMQGGJ It’s a sideboard that will serve as an entertainment center for a client. Solid cherry all over, with cherry veneer plywood for the shelves, back panel, and internal vertical components. The only screws in it are holding the ledger strips in place and fastening the top via figure-8 fasteners. I’m pretty happy with it!
    3 points
  3. That was fun. At least it would have been if it was thirty degrees warmer. It was really easy to drive. I took it super slow, but it drove very well. Guess what came with narrow pallet forks? I carried the crate lengthwise the whole way. I chopped off a few inches of 4x4 and it fit through the gate just fine. No real issues. The parking brake got stuck mid way when I stopped to check the clearance through the gate, twenty minutes and a call to the store later, I was told to reverse slightly while disengaging the brake. Bingo. This was a nice "little" machine that
    3 points
  4. These are my first experience with green turning, and I'm really just winging it. I'm turning them to final size and letting them do their thing as they dry. I figure that I can flatten the bottom on the belt sander after they settle a bit. After just a couple days inside they developed a decent wobble. The bowl I turned tonight, and posted the initial picture of, is the smallest and thinnest walled one I have done. One of the logs I got had a big crack in it, presumably from when the tree fell. I was able to save a piece of it and this was the largest round I could get from it. I also de
    3 points
  5. 7000 miles a year, that truck will last a long time at that rate with proper maintenance. That’s about what I put on mine, less on the wife’s car, I don’t have much reason to go out and mingle with the crazies.
    3 points
  6. Hit 100,000 miles on my 2004 truck today. It takes a while when you don't commute. Pulled over and to a pic of the moment.
    3 points
  7. I spent many years through high school and college looking at music stands. THIS is what I was used to! That looks like a helluva challenging project, looking forward to following along.
    3 points
  8. Sawstop Inline Router Table My wonderful wife asked me what I wanted for my birthday next week so I obliged with a list. She recognized the Sawstop name and ordered the 27” x 16” inline router table and dust box to replace my shop built router table I’ve been using for years. It arrived yesterday, so you know where I’ve been today. I’ll bore you with a little of my background. I’m retired from 30+ years in the woodworking machinery business, starting with the types of tools all of us here are familiar with - upscale hobbyist to small production shop woodworking stuff. From there I mo
    2 points
  9. For Coop, though I am not sure if they are in love or he just has an itch and she is about to call the reindeer cops.
    2 points
  10. Richard I just saw this thread, so I'm sorry for the late condolences. But they are heartfelt. God bless you and your family, and I know God blesses your wife, as she smiles constantly, buoyed by your unending love. Treeslayer just said it above so simply and well, a good woman is a gift, and God's greatest gift to a man. You have been blessed to have her in your life and she stays with you even after, which leaves a hollow space in the physical but still has a full and complete part of your heart, which we carry all our lives. Thank you for sharing. The woodwork was beautiful and I
    2 points
  11. Greiving is probably the the hardest thing we humans have to do. I lost my sister 23 years ago. It was 10 years before I could speak of it and 15 years before I could speak of it without crying. I think of her often, but I still keep her photographs in a safe place where I won't wander into them.
    2 points
  12. A good woman is a gift, I thank the Lord for mine every day, sitting in my favorite chair watching her decorate our Christmas tree, think of you every day Rick.
    2 points
  13. Looking good, 'Nut! 29 or 30" is a good table height. I made one 31.5" by accident (forgot to include the thickness of the top), and it was uncomfortably high for anyone under 6 feet tall.
    2 points
  14. It's been more than a month, and I can't stop the tears either. I love that woman.
    2 points
  15. I started out with milling the leg pieces. I have a top that is 2.5" tall and 8/4 milled to around 1.75" The bottom is 3" and 8/4. I really wanted the top arm to be a bit more delicate looking but after reviewing the design i decided it needed more meat to ensure that the tip doesn't break off. That will make sense later. Cut the through tenon with a router and a bearing guided bit. All that leaves is to square the corners Next i worked on laying out the curves that will be on the arms of the leg assembly. The main curve on the center piece is asymmetrical so i figured all of the cu
    1 point
  16. The design was inspired by the work of the Greenes with some additional inspiration from some of Darrell Peart’s creations. I combined the elements of various pieces to get a look that I like. Like every project I learned a lot in the process. I found some techniques that I did and didn’t like. I spent a good amount of time building jigs with the thought that I might eventually try to sell one. One of the jigs allowed me to make the ebony plugs on the router table which helped speed things up a lot. In spite of a few mistakes, I am thrilled with the results. My biggest area of improvement is f
    1 point
  17. $110 well spent. The other ways might have worked but they would have been a lot less fun.
    1 point
  18. After all the talk about it, you did it the absolute best way! I knew nothing about that kind of Bobcat before, but now it's apparent that it's the right tool for the job for an old basement we have to clear, and dig out sometime in the future. I'm glad forks were available for it. I was worried about the crate, and a small bucket.
    1 point
  19. I try hard to be safe with the machines too and anybody that thinks it's impossible to sustain an injury is just kidding themselves. My encounter with a bandsaw blade was oddly enough April 1, 2017 but certainly not an April fools dealio. I escaped with 9 or 10 stitches on my pinky finger. I completely understand it taking a while to get the mojo for woodworking back. I don't remember how long I stayed out of the shop, but I do remember the first time I went back and made a cut and I t took a while after that before I started enjoying woodworking again. Even now I guess I am still
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. Sorry, I was slacking at slacking at work.
    1 point
  22. Hard as a rock! Will make a good deck floor or outside furniture. Black Locust..
    1 point
  23. Looks like fun! Especially squeezing through the gate.
    1 point
  24. Welcome back young'un. I did a finger thingy last year. It's knida hard to get back into it. But I managed, and apparently you did to. So, good to hear from you.
    1 point
  25. Great to see you back Pug and all is well. I am looking forward to your contributions here again.
    1 point
  26. Ahhhh! As my daughter would say! Just the right compromise. Thanks
    1 point
  27. Great to have you back. Lookin' forward to some Pug posts.
    1 point
  28. Rodg, welcome back! A woodworker will go a long way to get new toys and you are no exception ! Yes sir, you have a good wife! Look forward to your continued contributions.
    1 point
  29. Welcome back ! Glad you recovered fairly well. I had a tablesaw accident when I was in my late teens. Most guys I've seen with a shortened finger. I tried to split my pinkie finger up the middle. Still have a raised section in the fingernail that's 1/8 kerf wide. Every day afterwards my caution & safety efforts were greatly increased.
    1 point
  30. Sorry to hear about your experience but welcome back.
    1 point
  31. If I could “like” this a dozen times, I would. Well said by both you and Dave! I’ve met Rick personally more than once and the boy is no slouch. He has stamina and will pull thru with our help.
    1 point
  32. That's crazy detail! I don't have a CNC but I bet it makes inlays like mad
    1 point
  33. This is the finish that won the bake off. Super simple. Sand with 220 to open up the material a bit, flood with 1-1/2lb cut of clear dewaxed shellac so that is really soaks into the figure. I apply it with squirt bottle and follow with a pad in a circular motion to force the liquid deep. Sand with 320 and repeat, sand with 400. I will add a paste wax but, that is not present in the pics. The flash really kills the depth of the chatoyance but, you get the idea. This is just a random cutoff. I prepared the surface the same as the actual parts.
    1 point
  34. We had the same temperature in Chicago! Only the numbers were reversed.
    1 point
  35. The Bobcat should have no problem doing that .
    1 point
  36. Hold the press! I was thinking that larger pneumatic tires would get you over ground easier. Then I thought of either hand truck/dolly or wheelbarrow tires. Then thinking of wheelbarrow, why not? Two sets of these thru your crate/pallet, then strapped to the pallet. Excuse the non professional drawing.
    1 point
  37. You're braver than me if you tackle dining chairs. I have about as much desire to make dining chairs as I do to make kitchen cabinets. I dig the leg design of the table.
    1 point
  38. I once moved a whole wooden 10 x 10 shed on to a trailer using nothing but some 3/4" pipe, a car jack, a come along, and some boards. Being stubborn is a good thing some days.
    1 point
  39. The trailer jack idea is pretty genius I think. I reserved a Bobcat for tomorrow and am picking it up in the morning though. The price for a half day is reasonable, and it's the one option that will lend me other options if I get in a bind. The ground is frozen so the yard isn't in too much danger. Plus, it SHOULD make the process fun.
    1 point
  40. Great work as usual, you’re really cranking out the projects, I’m retired and couldn’t keep up with you. Chairs, how many? They are a challenge, thanks for taking us along for the ride
    1 point
  41. 1 point
  42. I just checked on the lumber left Memphis today at 14:00.
    1 point
  43. Wiha is having a sale on their web site right now, and has some bit sets on sale. If you need lots of one type of bit they have a bunch of 100 packs discounted by about 33%. I've got lots of their drivers and bit sets, and they are the best ones I've used. I just ordered a security bits set for use at work (working on laptop computers and other small devices).
    1 point
  44. Welcome to the forums! I assume you're wanting to know what height to set them at? For me, I try and set all my work surfaces at the same height as the table saw. Just makes managing long pieces easier when everything is the same height. A work bench where lots of hand tool work would be the exception as that should be based on your personal height.
    1 point
  45. I have a few Houston Hats, but here’s my first Houston Mallet. The Houston Boy can make a pretty mallet that’s forsure! Black walnut and persimmon.
    1 point
  46. A little more progress. Cut the curve on the top, faired it with a shave, cut the angled ends and then use the top as a template for the bottom. Roughed out part of the profile at the router table using a portion of a large roundover bit. And used a spoke shave to get it to where I want it. They will end up oriented like so. More to come.
    1 point
  47. As a ex tool pusher (salesman) , I could go on about driver bits for an hour but, just let me say...YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR. The difference between a #1 and a #2 Philips screw is hard to see with a naked eye BUT there is a big difference when you use the wrong screwdriver. You usually ruin one or the other, so if you are tearing up screw heads or breaking bits, switch to the other size bit to see if that makes a difference. AND THEN, there is a screw style called "Pozi-drive. At first glance they look like a standard Philips screw but, on closer inspection you will see THEY ARE NOT
    1 point
  48. I've tried to answer this a couple of times but, I keep coming off like a sanctimonious ass . What it boils down to is that as I have learned more, I have found that the acts that used to cause me a major pucker-factor have been replaced by safe ways of doing those things. Safe operational practices are a learned behavior that replaced my guns-a-blazin-get-'er-done approach of the past. If I am approaching an operation and I do not feel good about it, I back off and figure out why. Often a clamped-on auxiliary fence, guide, a feather board, some additional stock or tool support is t
    1 point