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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/12/19 in all areas

  1. 3hp PCS, 52" with overarm dust guard, and ICS mobile base. 3 1/2 days from placing the order to delivered into my garage... not too shabby. I had a great experience with Equipment Sales and Surplus in Auburn, WA. I recommend them wholeheartedly. I've moved all of the parts, except the saw body itself, down to the shop. I'll start assembly one night after work next week. For the next few days, I'm going to have to be content reading the manuals and cleaning up the old saw prior to selling it.
    6 points
  2. Who was wishing that Tesla made a pickup? http://www.atlismotorvehicles.com/xt-truck
    2 points
  3. I have been playing bass for awhile and recently I wanted to make a ukulele as a challenge... after 4 days of work I finally finished her. I was never good with poly or varnish, so I used some danish oil (3-4) coats so far and was planning on applying some paste wax. I used some redwood with very tight grain and it is sucking up the oil... I applied a ton but it keeps absorbing it and looks dry after a few hours, the maple on top looks fine but I don't know where to go from here. the inside of the uke only has one coat inside and i don't know if the wax will ruin that because the outside will be coated and the inside will be un waxed. So all I'm asking is if the wax will hurt it and how do i apply the wax so it'll be durable enough for an instrument (I cant use varnish or poly anyway because it'll gunk up the fret board) Thanks, Maxim
    2 points
  4. I can give a little follow up on this. I purchased some negative rake carbide scrapers from Easy Woods and the difference is remarkable. The negative rake has like a hundred times less tear out than the standard carbide grind. You can see below that there is a trivial chamfer remaining on the edge, but only a few crumbs of tear out. The negative rake tool is on the left and the standard tool on the right. I am really surprised with what a difference that little change in the cutting bevel makes, and I'm very pleased with the result. I'll continue to use the standard carbides for bulk removal, but these negative rakes inserts are going to be my finishing tool.
    2 points
  5. Just my input but i don't like the reference tabs on the domino. i prefer to use pencil marks with the pieces aligned the way that i wan them and then just hit the pencil line. I always make one side on the medium setting.
    2 points
  6. Last time the base was completed, and we had a quick look at the parts together. It is not fully sanded yet, and no finish obviously. It feels very solid in the legs - I know there were some that were concerned about the 10 degree splay .... The - almost - last lap is here, the building of the drawer. I do not want to bore the pants off all with yet another dovetailing, so rather here are some pictures of the decisions and tasks that need to take place for a well-fitted drawer. The first decision was to choose the wood for the drawer front, and the panel at the other side (the drawer will open on one side of the coffee table, and the other side will be a fixed panel similar to the drawer front). There is just enough of the Fiddleback Jarrah for these panels. The orientation of the figure needs to be chosen, otherwise it will look like a dog's breakfast ... It is beautiful wood, but very interlocked. The double iron works its wonders .. The length is short enough to joint on a shooting board .. Mark the width .. ... and shoot to the line. The ends are squared ... I frequently read how important it is to have a backing board when shooting end grain to prevent spelching. This is not important at all. The best strategy is to score the line you will plane to, and then add a chamfer at the end. Use the shooting plane for this ... Now plane until the chamfer disappears ... No spelching ... The fitted drawer front ... ... is tight to the sides and has about 1mm gap at the top. The back board of the drawer, and the rear panel ... These are the drawer parts: the front is 19mm thick, the quarter sawn Tasmanian Oak sides are 10mm (slightly thicker than my usual 8mm as it needs to be a little beefier) and the rear is 12mm ... A peek at the drawer ... All the details in the last chapter next time. Regards from Perth Derek
    2 points
  7. Very nice and a great way to get rid of smaller pieces - those look great! We've made about 60 cutting boards and probably 50 of those were end grain and I can definitely testify that a drum sander is essential. Can't wait to see what you make when you get that drum sander! David
    2 points
  8. First time making cutting boards. I made 11, and 10 cheese boards. I didn't want to do end grain because I don't have a drum sander and didn't want to try to clean up that many boards. All of them are pretty thick so they can be brought back to me and planed to get rid of knife marks. I was definitely going for style, so there are plenty of "flaws" like knots and such here or there. Only thing I purchased was maple, the rest was scrap or boards so hopelessly twisted they couldn't be used in their longer format. Next year, hoping to have a drum sander and will be able to expand to do more interesting things. I'd really like to try my hand at 3d boards.
    1 point
  9. I discovered this last weekend while marking lines on walnut for Domino locations. The white pencil actually does act as a highlighter. Looking great Drew!
    1 point
  10. Finishing up the miter station and trying to explain my decisions on fences and why I made the choices I did. In the end, these were the right decisions for my shop.
    1 point
  11. The manual and process on mine was flawless. Mine only required a very small blade alignment correction at bevel angles. I backed off the stops about a degree to allow me more precise setting during use, specifically when returning to a setting.
    1 point
  12. Yes, mine are from Lee Valley too. Considering they're about 1/3 of the cost of the Veritas ones and work well, it's not a hard choice.
    1 point
  13. The neutral conductor & the ground wire cannot be together. The only time they can be electrically connected to each other is where the neutral is bonded to ground in the service compartment. Very important to observe this.
    1 point
  14. That was my plan at the start of the build. In the end I thought it would be impractical, and have ended with a drawer from one side, and a panel (same as the drawer front) on the other side. Regards from Perth Derek
    1 point
  15. Crap that sucks, Chet and I have become tight. He's a good man. Thank's Kev for the bad news.
    1 point
  16. No sir, never heard of them, until two minutes from now after Googling them. Those are really cool. You and Spanky would look right smart sitting in one of those in the shade come spring time!
    1 point
  17. Oh, wow! Sorry to hear that. Thanks for letting us know, Kev!
    1 point
  18. See now you sound nd more like me. Heh heh ... lately I’ve been using a Bluetooth speaker with tunes on my phone.
    1 point
  19. Coop have you seen the buckboard benchs? I ordered a couple buckboard bench hardware kits today. One of my woodworkers makes them out of ambrosia maple lumber.
    1 point
  20. Just to clarify a bit. The Benchcrafted tail vise is specified for a 4" thick top. It can be put in a thinner top by shimming, or a thicker top by recessing. Or, not use one at all and make the thickness anything you want.
    1 point
  21. Check Lee Valley... they have a deal to sell Gramercy tools in Canada.
    1 point
  22. Not that you're going to turn back now but, if my relative MC for my shop was 6 to 8%, I would be a little more concerned using material that was at 14%. That's why it's important to know these numbers for your shop.
    1 point
  23. Nice work cliff i like those. I like thicker cutting boards but Megan likes thin ones so i make thin ones.
    1 point
  24. Great job Cliff. Those are nice!
    1 point
  25. They look great! I see a drum sander in your future!
    1 point
  26. 1 point
  27. Totally agreed! My buddies can also be talked into stuff with the barter system. Beer for work!
    1 point
  28. Not at all, & that's a good thing cause then it would never cure. Plywood veneers tend to be more porous than solid wood, but even so, I doubt it would go past the 1st glue line. Any kind of penetrating oil finish needs to be completely cured before applying an additional coat. I'd do as @Ronn W says & let it cure for a few weeks before coating with poly. A thorough scrubbing with mineral spirits might speed things along by getting rid of some of the excess Tung oil.
    1 point
  29. It is now beginning to look like something familiar .... The legs appear pretty strong and solid. No flex. Regards from Perth Derek
    1 point
  30. So i only have those 2 pipe clamps that are long enough to clamp together both sides. I need at least a few more for when i do the glue up. I was looking at buying more pipe clamps and it kinda bothered me that i stare at all these 36" & 48" clamps and don't have a way to use them. Googled how to combine parallel clamps and I found that Bessy connector. Problem is i only have a couple Bessy clamps. I started thinking about buying more when it hit me, Can i cut a groove in some wood and drill some holes? YES! So here is the result. I made a groove in a piece of hickory. It was 2.5" wide so i did both sides and cut it in half. It was 28" long so i could get 4 7" connectors per half for a total of 8 connectors. 5/16" holes and 1/4" bolts allows for enough slop that i can use Bessy Jorgensen or jet clamps. For the jets to work I'd have to drill another hole further back beings that the hole in their bar is in a different location. I don't have many jets and have enough of the other 2 where this probably won't come up. I put the block on backwards If i had put it on the other way the block would stop the bars from back flexing and pressing on the center divider. I might make a cap for them at some point not entirely sure this option works just is a bit more bulky.
    1 point
  31. Dave the ole boy still working.
    1 point
  32. Gald you decide to join the posters. I am all for experimentation. The oil soaks into the piece at different rates in different places. Also the fact thet the veneer is so thin means that the species under the maple is also sucking up oil. You may never get a finish that looks or feels even. I would let the oil cure, really cure, for maybe a couple fo weeks, depending on conditions, and then use a polyurethane for the final coats. Others will have more elegant explanations.
    1 point
  33. Getting some upper cabinets done..
    1 point
  34. I was at the mill this morning looking for logs. Here’s what the ash logs are starting to look like here.
    0 points
  35. If a 23 ga pin deflects and comes out the side of a board you are holding it's like getting a flaming hot splinter ! Thankfully it only hit the meat of my fingertip. Still was sore days later.
    0 points