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  1. 19 points
    This project was for me. It's a tall desk with a partially sloped top and shelf for computer monitors. Been working on this since before Christmas. I used a story stick for the legs - worked great.
  2. 19 points
    I have been rather busy with my career for the past few months. I try to spend my free time working on projects, leaving me little time to interact with WoodTalk community. My hope is to make some time for WoodTalk forum this year. I have been reading posts but not posting much. So, it is time to get caught up. Here are some of the projects I have worked on since last June. I made two jewelry cabinets for my daughters. One is inspired by a box made by Matt Kenny. The second one is based on a design by Kyle Toth. I chose this project because I had just one board of sycamore. I added padauk and basswood complete the project. The above piece is made from QS sapele and tiger maple, with yellow poplar as the secondary wood. I made these Chippendale style mirrors to test out my new DeWalt scroll saw. The lumber here is Hoduran mahogany with pommele sapele veneer. It has a garnet Shellac spray finish. In going through my lumber collection, I found a single flame birch board. I decided to make a table for my daughter who is a fan of mid-century modern furniture. I saw a table like this one in Instagram and made my version of it. The big project for me was a chest of drawers based on an article in FWW. It is Japanese styling and I made it out of cherry. The main challenge was that the sides and front are both sloped by about 4 degrees. In the end, it turned out OK. I gave it to my son, who is in college. He has a keen appreciation for fine furniture. The back of the piece is probably overkill but it does look pretty. The finish on this piece is wash coat of shellac followed by 4 coats of Satin Arm-R-Seal. The hardware is hand forged. Thanks for viewing.
  3. 18 points
    This was a fun build, and it really shows off Rickey's (aka Spanky) curly ambrosia maple. I was inspired to do this piece after seeing some nice buffet designs and builds on this site. Why would a buffet design inspire this piece, well this piece will match my future buffet table/cabinet! I also plan to build a matching liquor cabinet to match this piece. That liquor cabinet is just getting started and if I can get my act together I wanted to post a journal with that. Now for those that have seen some of my work, you know I lean more toward a Maloof/sculptured design. I had to incorporate some flowing lines in this piece but it's a lot more traditional than Maloof stuff. I still find this look appealing. Spanky's curly ambrosia really looks great with the walnut, and my liquor cabinet will incorporate these two woods also. Fully stocked in this photo; Drawer dovetail were handcut and run on a center guide. Really like the way these woods work together; From the side view you can really appreciate the curves in this piece; Thanks for looking.
  4. 17 points
    My daughter and her husband just purchased a home in Fairfax Va. and wanted some federal style furniture to add to her collection . I just finished what I hope will be the final two pieces.
  5. 16 points
    A fun project for my Grandson.
  6. 16 points
    This month I was one of the turners featured in the Members Gallery of American Woodturner magazine. I know it's not the "Nobel Prize for Woodworking", but still pretty cool to me.
  7. 16 points
    I made a pair of sideboards based on a piece in Good, Better, Best , Masterpiece by Albert Sacks. They are mahogany, with holly, ebony, lacewood and poplar. The finish is about 15 coats of super blonde shellac, which were rubbed out with pumice and rottenstone, and then obviously waxed. I am sorry to have to watermark the pictures, but photos of mine that have been on this forum have been used by someone who claimed my work as his own. Pictures when I am in the shots have no watermark, and I hope that the other pictures are not obstructing the view of the work. The hardbound book that I made of the project has 104 pages showing all the aspects of construction. I choose more pages to show then may be appropriate for this forum. If this is too much for the site I hope the webmaster would politely ask me to remove whatever needs to be trimmed off the post. I hope there is a way for anyone of you folks to feel that the information will assist you in your work. Any questions will be responded too, and if pictures make the explanation easier, I will post those upon request.
  8. 16 points
    Signed, sealed and ready for delivery.
  9. 15 points
    A number of years ago, I built my wife a computer desk of white oak with some storage. But it took up and enormous amount of room. Since she's not around to use it any more, I figured I could simplify the space and still have access to the computer. I use her computer for background music when I doing house things. You know, dishes, vacuum, read and sketch stuff. So I built this little table , that might be called an entry table or sofa table. It's made from "very" soft Maple. It's so soft, it made me think that Pine was a hardwood. This Maple is curly, and has a bunch of Sp[alting and around this part of the country it's also called "wormy" Maple. Which is Ambrosia Maple to woodworkers. I bought this wood air dried from @Spanky more than a year ago, and it was 7' long 4/4 thick and 15" wide. It sat stickered in my shop for about a year. So it was dry an d ready to work. If nothing else, it's an eyecatcher. There's a small strip of Cherry along the bottom of the aprons, that I like.
  10. 15 points
    I have had this drawer cabinet under my saw for three years and over time have decided that I wasn't totally happy with how it was working out and it also created a bit of a knuckle scrapper when using the hand wheel to adjust the blade tilt on the saw. So after seeing a blade storage idea that I really liked on another forum I decided it was time to start fresh and replace the old one. The old one had three drawers with ridge foam insulation that had been routed out to hold blades and other fixtures and tools. The new one also has three drawers, with one drawer at this time, with nothing in it so thats a plus. Its also five inches narrower so the knuckles are safe. I still have to get one more knob for the little drawer at the top but I stuck on a scrap of sapele for now so I can get in to it. A peek of the old one in the bottom of the picture. And the NEW - Plenty of room to turn now.
  11. 15 points
    Finally home from a long work road trip! Had some catching up to do! A few projects to get done that have been piling up! Only the bathroom vanity was done for YouTube.. 1. Table Lazy Susan and a cutting board for 2 different clients.. 2. A thread storage cabinet for my wife's quilting room 3. Bathroom Vanity for a client. 4. And, a floating picture frame for a family member..
  12. 15 points
    I liked Marc's breadbox build very much. Alison liked most of it. We compromised and below is the result. Air-dried walnut with ambrosia maple door and drawer, with ebony pulls.
  13. 15 points
    Most all of you saw the Final Gift for my Wife when she passed. She and I agreed that I would build her final resting place. It was a painful and joyous experience. Since then I pondered what was next for me, being alone and old with only a house mouse to share my days. After 4 or 5 months of mourning and praying, and crying, I thought I could help other people with the expense of buying a casket. On average, caskets run about $2500.00 and the sky's the limit from there. We have a local sales site, somewhat like Craigslist, but it's just for Middle Tennessee. You can find anything you want on that site, and it's mostly nice local country folk, for the most part. So, I put an ad with a couple of pictures of the casket I built for my wife. It got a ton of hits, but it took a few months before anyone called. We talked, and he drove 30 miles to come talk with me and tell me what he wanted done. His idea was he wanted just a plain Pine box, with the exception that he wanted it made out of Cedar. The reason was he had a source for inexpensive Cedar and a source for drying that Cedar. It was coming from his property, which made it personal. What he wanted from me was the labor to construct it. We talked about my hourly rate, and settled on what amount of time I would have in it and we agreed on a price. He then told me, that he really wanted two done. One each for him and his wife. They're just simple nice church going folks and felt that the trees were his and he didn't want anything fancy. I can do "not" fancy. So he went about getting the trees cut, milled and dried, I took some time, and life has a way of interrupting the flow of things. I had a horrible back surgery, and when I was just about ready to start, he broke some bones in his foot. After we were both healed for the most part, he brought the wood. Nice tight Cedar, 1" thick 6" wide and more or less 8' long. The frustration for me is that there was an enormous amount of sap wood, and I wanted to try and use as little of that as possible. With Cedar, your gonna get sapwood no matter what you try to do. In the process of constructing these I was very choosy with the boards, and as I was putting things together, I invited him down several times to get a feel for the process. Each time he dropped by, he wanted to make a change about design. Since the changes he wanted were in front of what I was already doing, it wasn't a major problem. But I told him finally, "every time you come here you add more time in the construct and your cost is going up each time". He said okay, just add it to my tab. The final construct is large box joints at all four corners, with all the joints pinned with contrasting dowels, a small piece of trim on the side that can hardly be seen. Hand rails that I had to make extra, because in the start of this build I had told him I had some Poplar just the perfect size for the rails. He wanted Cedar. So Cedar he got The insides are finished with one coat of satin poly, the exterior has a base coat of satin poly and two coats of gloss poly. And they are for the most part, plain caskets They are dried and cured and he's coming this week, to pick them up one at a time. He's going to store them in a room in his house that is climate controlled, then he has a friend in the cardboard business that is going to double wrap them and seal them close til they are needed. All this because Cedar "sucks", to work with, sucks moisture and twists and warps like a pole dancer. But here they are. Comments are welcome. Oh, and since he and his wife have been married more than 50 years, I figured they kinda like each other, so I added one single adornment on the lid of each one at no charge.
  14. 15 points
    I started this a good while back but chose not to do a build on it as I figured it might go into the fire pit at anytime during the build and it came close several times. My daughter asked for a chair for her desk and I have always wanted to try it so I gave it a go. Initially it was going to be built from some walnut I cut and dried and I figured I would do a prototype from some cherry. After several months of wrestling with it, I don’t foresee a walnut chair in the future. Plans were ordered from Charles Brock and I picked up several pointers from Marc’s rocking chair build. Three coats of ARS glossy and three coats of GF top coat. The only places I’m not real pleased with are the arm to leg joints.
  15. 15 points
    Loving the fact that Coop just posted a great Maloof Low Back Chair. Always happy to see other sculptured pieces on here. Just finished this Walnut Maloof Rocker, as I've stated before, my hands down favorite all time woodworking project. This is my third rocker and my first in walnut. I started this rocker the last week in April, and it was a double build, meaning I am building 2 at the same time. The other rocker is cherry and it's still in the shop waiting for final assembly and final sanding. For those that have done these, you know that final sanding is no small or simple step. My sanding goes to 400 grit before applying finish and I use 0000 steel wool to apply a few coats of the finish. My finish of preference is 3 coats oil/poly mix followed by 2 coats oil/wax mix. Didn't use Osmo for this rocker, but I will likely try that on a rocker in the future. This build went very smoothly, minimal issues. I've have some small details I'm learning to refine with this build, I'll try to point out those small details, but for the most part it looks like most other Maloof rockers. Countless times I've looked up this rocker online and through other venues, and it's easy to make this piece look clunky. I've seen it done with flawless woodworking technique, but it didn't look organic, flowing, or inviting. Hopefully you don't think that when you look at this piece. A perfect pose, the rocker next to a Maloof style table with a Maloof book to inspire you. A few details I like in these rockers. First, I really like the horns, these are time consuming to develop, but worth it in my opinion. Die grinder does a lot of the work, then a lot of scraping and sanding; The crest of the head rest needs to flow into the front of the horn, you can see the line from the front edge of the horn detail blend into the top edge of the head rest. Head rest and horn from the front, again a line that needs to flow; The underside of the headrest to back leg is also an area that takes a lot of work to blend. A rasp and a lot of hand sanding is the only way to get this done. I like the middle of the headrest to project down, I like this look much better than the continuous sweep you see in a lot of the rockers; This side view of the head rest shows the sweep and contours; The arm to back leg joint is pretty straight forward and easy to shape. Key is to make it look fluid and continuous. The interesting part of this joint is on the inside. This is a common feature seen in the original chair that is often duplicated. This gives the look as if the arm was carved from the back leg. The arm to front leg joint takes a lot of work, as you have end grain and long grain you are blending together. I don't like the big paddle shaped arms you often see on most of these rockers. I like a more narrow arm and with it converging more as it approaches the back leg. The shaping of the arm is a lot of work also, but Marc does a great job in his build guiding one through the process. So much is made of the leg to seat joint in this piece. I find that to be pretty straight forward when you use the paired router bits. Shaping these joints are harder than doing the joint. And this by far is the toughest area to shape. Finally, the leg to rocker joints. The joints that give me the biggest pucker factor. Drilling thru the rocker into the back leg, after you have spent weeks on the chair is the absolute most tense moment of this build. The good thing is after you have shaped the whole chair, shaping the legs to the rocker is one of the easiest areas to shape. The detail I add in the front is from Marc's build and I like it, you leave a little extra in front of the leg to converge that excess into a point, sweeping up from the underside and in from the sides. Thanks for looking.
  16. 15 points
    This is a bowl that my wife, Marcia, made. It's made form two pieces of Khaya (African mahogany) sandwiching a thin piece of zebra wood. The rim and stem are accented with Inca Gold Gilder's Paste. The design and work are her own. I consulted on the project, but surprisingly little. Don't know about you all, but I was impressed.
  17. 15 points
    I did not fully document this build but wnated to share a few pics. All solid cherry except for the back which is cherry veneer on plywood and the center the crown which is wanut veneer on plywood. New techniques and methods for this project are the crown and the base. My goal was to have the clock face appear to be floating in mid air. s0, for those of you familiar with clock mechanisms, this is a front mounted mechanism but it is mounted to a frame that is mounted to the rear of the case. Working on the crown... Case....The case is dovetailed but they are all hidden in the completed piece. oh well, it was good practice. Door Box that suports the mechanism mechanism is removable from the front (lift and pull) Pics of completed clock.......all that's left is to adjust the timing over the next few days.
  18. 14 points
    I thought that the build might begin with preparing the panels, since there has been some interest in the past shown in the shorter Hammer K3 sliders. Mine has a 49" long slider and a 31" wide table for the rip fence. The build is an entry hall table for a wedding present for a niece. Her choice was this mid century modern piece, which will be the basis for the build. My job is to re-invent it somewhat. She wants Jarrah, and I have managed to find something spectacular ... a subtle fiddleback (curly) set of boards that will make a book match (as they are only about 9" wide each). Most imagine that the value of a slider lies with cross-cutting. It certainly is so. However it is the rip using the slider - rather than the rip fence - which is so amazing. One side of each board was to be ripped on the slider, before being jointed and resawn. Ripping on the slider is such an advantage with life edges. No jigs required. No rip fence to slide against. Just clamp the board on the slider, and run it past the saw blade. The long sliders can complete the rip in one quick pass. It occurred to me that I should take a few photos of ripping to width since the boards are longer than the slider. Here you can see that it comes up short ... In actuality, with the blade raised fully, there is a cut of nearly 54" ... The solution is to use a combination square to register the position of the side of the board at the front, and then slide the board forward and reposition it ... ... and repeat at the rear ... The result is a pretty good edge, one that is cleaned up on the jointer in 1 or 2 passes, and then ready for resawing ... This is the glued panel. It is long enough to make a waterfall two sides and top section (still oversize) ... The following photo shows the lower section at the rear. What I wanted to show is the way boards are stored. Since I shall not get back to this build until next weekend, all boards are stickered and clamped using steel square sections. The steel sections are inexpensive galvanised mild steel. These are covered in vinyl duct tape to prevent any marks on the wood and ease in removing glue ... Done for the day ... Enough for the case (top/bottom and sides), which will be through dovetailed with mitred corners, the stock for 4 legs (yet to be turned), and rails for the legs (the legs will be staked mortice-and-tenon) and attached with a sliding dovetail. Regards from Perth Derek
  19. 14 points
    I know I didn’t know what one was either, it’s a fancy board for cheese, meat, veggies and dip, crackers, used for when friends or family get together. This one is for my wife’s birthday, Hard Maple and Sapele with box joints on the ends and bent lamination strips down the middle, thanks for looking guys
  20. 14 points
    Yeah so I'm supposed to be working on dining chairs. My excuse was I needed to get material before i could progress on the project but in reality I really wanted to make something for my shop. So while i waited for a chance to get a lumber order into my schedule I grabbed a bunch of the 8/4 cherry i got a good deal on.Why cherry? Because everyone does maple and I want to do something different.. ( I also got the cherry for a steal. I didn't want to be wasteful with the lumber and the boards I had were odd widths. Everything was 7-7/8" wide which is frustrating. So i ripped half the boards I needed with 1 extra. I then took the too narrow boards and proceeded to make them wider. This is a bench not a piece of furniture so if some glue seams show up on end grain so be it. Odds are it's not going to be noticeable. The boards I laminated to get the needed thickness were placed towards the center. I also had some boards with heavy wane. I made sure that I coordinated them within the slab and used them as the picture below shows better than I can explain. Yep there is a big void in the center of my bench towards the bottom. Do I care? Heck no! it's going to be buried inside the bench never to be seen what does it matter? One of the boards had some really awesome figure. So I pulled one piece of that board out to make it the front laminate. The 2nd board was used as the show face of the rear slab. The board for the rear slab was a tiny bit thin so there is a piece laminated to the bottom. I tried to grain match it some and get a similar color board. In the end it's hard to tell and I'm happy with it. After lots of milling and emptying this thing twice, I got al the material for the slabs milled and together. I even used cherry dominoes for alignment. I used Marc's hit and miss planing method to somewhat straiten the boards. This worked well and left me a LOT more material than he ended up with. I was able to do my rear slab with 6 pieces instead of 7 and my front is 4 pieces with a random stick of 3/4" thrown in for some extra width. While gluing the slabs together I was worried i was going to induce a bow. These boards were NOT strait at this point. I rotated them to offset as much as possible but in the end the chance that the slabs would be strait is low. SO i stacked the deck in my favor. Bent lamination uses a form to hold a curve the opposite can also be done. So i grabbed the front laminate strip and jointed it perfectly strait. I then rotated it and clamped it along both slabs during glue up and this will ensure that the side is strait and because all the boards are an even thickness everything is parallel. In practice this worked just as well as in theory. My 52" veritas strait edge confirmed that these guys are laser strait. I used some winding sticks and confirmed that they were free of twist. Holy !!!!! These things are heavy! Next up is end cap and the mortise and stuff. I trimed the front slab to length and then cut the tenon. I glued up some walnut that I scored of C_list a while ago for cheap. This stuff was some guys shorts, and were like 18" long and perfect for this. The color ended up being surprisingly beautiful. I cut the mortise in the end cap easy peasy. I extended the mortise and am setting my bench up to be able to come apart. I don't have the BC hardware yet and will probably use this bench for a while before I buy the tail vise. I'll buy the leg vise prior to completing the bench. So I drilled the holes in the end cap and am using some 6" long spax screws to attach it to the front slab. Now the first big OH !@$(%! moment happens. I realized I drilled the internal hole with a 1-3/8" forstner bit instead of a 1-1/2" bit. So taking a breath I grabbed a block of walnut because it's what i had sitting in the scrap bin. I drilled a hole all the way through like 1/16", this is the guide for the forstner bits. I drilled one side with the 1-3/8" bit and the other with the 1-1/2" bit. I used the smaller bit to line up the block on the outside of the bench. I fed it through the inside as seen below. Once i had the block lined up on the outside I used the 1-1/2" bit to drill the rest of the way through the guide block and into the end cap. After I got a good way into the end cap i took everything apart and finished the hole on the drill press to make sure that it was strait. Next is the dog hole strip. After reading the part on this. I decided my time was worth more than the cool factor of square dogs. So I glued up three 3/4" pieces and made the dog hole strip. To get everything lined up I ran dominoes through all 3 laminations and into the bench. The dominoes were 65mm long and this worked flawlessly. So here we sit. As i work through this I'll hit periods where glue needs to dry. I"m going to take that time to work on the templates for the dining chairs and get the bent lamination mold for the back rest started. This walnut color is going to look awesome with finish.
  21. 14 points
    4 file drawers and 2 small on top. Yet to come an 8/4 walnut top.. Then open shelves above...And another 8/4 top above the shelves... Panels are mill run fas walnut book matched. First project with my new Jessem. Very user friendly.And powerful with a 3.25hp porter cable.
  22. 14 points
    I made this bench for my mechanic, in payment for some auotmobile work I needed done. I made a profit from that trade. Curly Cherry and a live edge.
  23. 14 points
    My wife requested a side table for the family room. This will be situated between two arm chairs, and replace the small table (which is too high and dominating) ... Not just a side table, but it also needed to house her needlework thingies. In other words, shallow drawers for cotton reels and sewing kit. I played around with several ideas, and eventually came up with a design that borrows a little from a piece I recently made. Lynndy liked the softness of the rounded dovetails and overall dimension of this coffee table I built some months back for a nephew ... The plan (looking down) would be to create a curved front and back, with round, splayed legs to the outside (an alternative is a straight, tapered round leg) ... In contrast to the Jarrah in that piece, the carcase will be built in Hard Maple, dovetailed and mitred at each corner. It will feature 8 drawers. All drawer fronts will curve as well. The reason for "Harlequin" in the title is that the drawers will be a mix of woods, as depicted in the elevation of the drawer section ... A harlequin design is often thought of as a diamond pattern, but does also include a rectangular checkerboard. Anyway, it's just a name, and I like giving my pieces a name At this stage I have chosen for the drawer fronts Black Walnut and Blue Gum. I may also add in Hard Maple. Always interested in your thoughts here. The Blue Gum is lighter than the Black Walnut and is a good foil against the Hard Maple … The legs will taper and curve from the carcase, attached with a loose mortice and tenon ... The sides and top were arranged so that the grain flowed continuously. The carcase is 20mm thick, 800mm long and 350 at the wide, centre point .. The initial dovetail plan was to keep the boards parallel and saw the curves later. It became apparent when joining the first set that this would not work ... .. there would be too much at the sides to mitre, and so I decided to shape the top and bottom panels at this stage rather than later. This was the first opportunity to use the modification I made to my Moxon vise (see article: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/NewMoxonMods.html). It now enables the pin- and tail boards to be clamped together to aid in marking out (see earlier photo). In marking out for mitred corners, the side tails are not sawn out from the front ... ... the board is reversed, and the mitres are marked ... ... and sawn ... The reason I had wanted to retain square carcase sides was that it would make it easier to square the chisel guide for the mitres. I got around this by squaring them to the front of the carcase ... The pin board is seen here ... One of the difficulties in fitting this many tails and pins is that any slight errors are magnified. The fit below illustrates that the left side is too tight ... To deal with this, the tails were given a pencil scribbling ... Fitting the board together left this behind ... This process needed to be done once more, before the fit was satisfactory ... The four sides were dry fitted together, and the front and rear upper and lower panels planed to shape (this was close but not enough) … All is coplanar … Where we are up to at the end of today … One set of mitred corners … … and the other … Next up is building the internal dividers for the drawers. Regards from Perth Derek
  24. 14 points
    Here is the piece I have been working on these last few weeks. (Thanks again to those who helped me with a couple of urgent matters that arose). I have a few name ideas I'm considering, but haven't settled on one yet. I plan to take this to the American Association of Woodturners meeting later this month, so I have a little time on that. Technique is the same as I have described before, although this time I cut back the sides to slim the pillars and accentuate the shape.
  25. 14 points
    Well I dove into the deep end of the pool tonight and entered my first piece (Jewelry Chest) into the Minnesota Woodworkers Guild annual Northern Woods Exhibition April 25-28th This is way out of my comfort zone but in an effort to push myself even further in my woodworking I thought it might be helpful to get feedback from woodworkers much more talented than I as well as from the public. Here's hoping I don't regret this LOL
  26. 14 points
    Here is bowl number 18. It's titled "Embraced"--my wife thought it up, and I thought it was a great name. I used the three sided bowl technique I previously described, then carved away two of the pillars to leave a very open view of the "outside in" surface. I was going for a suggestion of heart shape, but I love the way the two pillars rise up to the bowl. Hence the name. The wood is hard maple and the finish is polyurethane varnish.
  27. 13 points
    I'm exhausted from taking care of her as she grew weaker this past week, but sleep won't come. She deserved someone much better than me, but put up with me all these years. A couple weeks ago I started thinking about Richard going through the same thing, so I messaged him a few times. Thanks to everyone for the thoughts and prayers.
  28. 13 points
    I finally finished with this project. The top is made from a single piece of butternut and the bottom is made from a block of wood that was labelled English walnut, but turned out to be teak. This was the blank I asked about in the Wood section and @phinds was kind enough to evaluate. @Chestnut, I know you particularly wanted to see the figure, but after turning and sculpting there's almost nothing left of the indented grain pattern. There is a little visible in the right hand pillar of the first two photo's.
  29. 13 points
    As I've promised I'm going to journal my next Maloof Rocker build. This is one of my favorite all time builds and this will be my 5th rocker in the past 2 years (third rocker of this year). I started building chairs about 4 years ago and it has become an obsession to me. During that time period I've built approx 30 chairs. I've learned a lot along the way. For all those who have been wanting to start this build I'd encourage you to get started, it is a challenging but immensely satisfying build. Since this is a guild project I'll be following basically Marc's instructions and I'll point out where I've deviated from his directions. Marc does a great job with this build and with my first rocker I followed his directions down to the letter. Since then I've built chairs that were from plans supplied by Charles Brock and Scott Morrison. I've picked up a few tricks from these guys and my build will be an amalgamation of what I've learned from all three. The wood will be some gorgeous curly hard maple from @Spanky, I'm excited to use this lumber. I ordered two batches from him and one batch is a little more curly than the other, but I think it will all look great in the end. I know one thing, I'm saving every scrap of this during the build. Finally, in some of my past builds many of you have asked how long it takes me for one of these builds, I'll try my best to record the time I take to complete each step and try to keep a running tally as I go. I originally thought I'd start this around Thanksgiving, but I'm getting an earlier start. This build will be slow though, as it's prime surf fishing season here in the Mid-Atlantic region, and I'll be playing hooky from work and from the shop to wet a line. Started the project by going thru the stock and began milling the parts. The seat is made from 5 pieces, approx 4" wide and 22" long. I had a board that was 11" wide, I was able to get two 22" lengths from this board and then I was able to get two 4.25" wide boards from each length and one 2.5" wide board from each length. I glued these two thinner boards together to make the center board for the seat; Back legs, always good to get these from the same board and I had nice grain to follow at the bottom of the leg, headrest will likely come from the piece above and the adder blocks will come from the waste between the legs; The front legs and the arms; The back slats, you need 7, I'll cut out 8; The plan calls for the width of the back slats is to be 1.5", I like my slats a little skinnier, these will be around 1.25", to me wide back slats look clunky. No matter how wide the main part of the back slat is, it still goes down to a 3/8th" tenon into the headrest, so thinner back slats are not weaker; This is my piece for the rocker laminations, unfortunately I found some bark inclusions as I was prepping. I should have enough usable material and I can work around those inclusions; Once stock selection was completed I moved on to the 5 seat boards. Glued up the 2 skinnier boards, jointed, planed and cut to length. Once that is completed I need to cut the 3 degree bevels for the coopered seat. These bevels will be on both sides of the middle board and on the out side of both boards that join with the middle board. You can see the direction of the bevels marked on the end of the boards in this pic; ****Real quick, a point about the coopered seat, I've done these seats both ways, coopered and just flat. I do like the coopered look a little better, but it's not extreme. The flat seat also looks pretty darn good. The coopered seat is definitely an option you can use or skip.**** Cutting the bevels, table saw set at 3 degrees: Bevels cut and marking out domino placement; This next step is really a little tricky, you need to domino into a beveled surface on some boards. Marc does a nice job of this and cuts all his slots with the 90 degree guide on the domino retracted, and the base of the domino sitting on his workbench. This results in a domino slot positioned toward the bottom of the boards and out of the way for future sculpturing, but is very difficult to do on boards 2 and 4, as the bevel orientation makes it difficult to get a correctly positioned domino slot and have it perpendicular with the face of the board. But his technique works great for the centerboard joints. Below is a pic of the domino cutting the slots into the centerboard, you put the domino on the bench and slightly tilt to the face is perpendicular the the joint, it's hard to see if it's tilted, but it is, the opposing surface for this joint is 90 degrees, so you simply put the domino on the bench and plunge into the 90 degree surface; Now with the other joints, the angle of the bevel prevents you for doing what I did above. So instead I set the angle of the domino to 87 degrees and cut the slot using the fence. To do this you need to put the fence on the bottom of the board as the reference for your plunge cut; Charles Brock handles cutting the dominos a little differently than Marc did, and I do a mix of their techniques. Now that the dominos slots are cut, I assemble and cut the seat to the correct width, you do this by cutting the excess equally for both outside boards. Once the width is correct I draw the outline for sculpting the seat; Pre-sculpting bandsaw reduction is next. I want to cut my reduction with the 90 degree side of boards 2 and 4 on the bandsaw table, in this pic you see which side is which; I then draw a line 1" from the bottom and develop a reduction cut line from that. I take a lot off, I want a deep seat; Here's the board on the bandsaw, 90 degree jointed surface on the table. You can also see from the above pic I've got plenty of stock over my domino slots. The center board is tricky, you have a bevel on both sides; You can mess with your bandsaw table and put it at 3 degrees, or you can just cut from both sides, as the cut angles toward the surface and the end result is just a ridge in the middle of the board where your 2 cuts intersect; Here are my 3 center boards with their pre-sculpting cuts, you can see in the center board I just have a little ridge, toward the front I've cut out an outline for the pommel; Next are the joints that are cut into the outside boards and some pre-sculpting shaping. It's easier to do some gross shaping while the boards are apart. Almost forgot, I'm about 3.5 hours into this.
  30. 13 points
    I got finish applied. I did 3 coats total on all the base parts for the table and benches. For the seats of the benches and the table top I put down 5 coats. The wood dents fairly easily so I'm a bit concerned on the long term durability. Beings this is for my sister I'm goign to tell her to use it hard and if I need to make a new top for it someday that will not be a problem. Hopefully it fares better than I'm expecting and will just get little dents and scratches giving it good character instead. Table top thickness at 11/16" looks pretty good all things considered. I was a bit worried that leaning on it would cause the center of the table to sag a bit. I sat on the edge ... nothing. Stood in the center of the table ... nothing. I thought about doing a cleat or two to the underside to keep it flat but in the end i feel the table legs will accomplish that quite well. The heart wood of this birch is beautiful, Nothing wrong with the white sap wood but it juts doesn't have the depth and chatoyance that the heart wood does. Had to get that to come across in pictures. This bench was the worst offender for jointing and was cut into 5 parts. The glue lines are almost invisible. I used walnut wedges for securing the through tenon. I don't know why but I do LOVE wedged through tenons. The idea that i can make something very stable and sturdy and taking it apart and putting it together requires zero tools is just fun. IKEA can take a hike.
  31. 13 points
    Ok, @Spanky got me going to finish up this post. I had put my last coat of finish on the Rocker yesterday and so I went home at lunch to move it into the house and grab some pics. When I left off here I had to do the final sanding of the rockers and lower legs. Then it was wet down the whole rocker to raise the grain and then resand the whole rocker. Dye was applied next and again I had to resand the whole rocker! Once those very joyless tasks were completed I got to apply the finish and then for the first time see what this wood had to offer. Well it didn't disappoint, God made some beautiful wood here and Rickey was the man to find it! The wood is really the big star of this piece and the dye I used really made the figure POP. I hope @treeslayer approves. For the finish it was 3 coats of the Maloof oil/poly then 2 coats of Maloof oil/wax. Each coat was applied with a rag, let to sit and then rubbed down vigorously to remove all the excess. Last night as I was applying the last coat, I couldn't resist to snap a few pics of the figure. It really pops with the oil still wet; So finishing this was a complete joy. Here are a few pics of the chair; Some details. I love the horn detail, it seems so organic to me how it flows. Here's a shot of the headrest and the horns; Top of headrest flows into the front line or edge of the horn; Again you can see that flowing line and see how the cove of the horn flows into the concave area of the headrest; The contours of the bottom of the headrest; Inside of the arm detail; Great figure in the seat; Front leg detail; Leg to seat joints; Rocker to leg interface; And to wrap it up, here are the 3 rockers I've made this year, one from walnut, one out of cherry, and the last from some great Spanky curly maple; Thanks for following. Hopefully I was helpful with posting this build. I can't say enough how much I enjoy this build. I will likely not make another one of these until I get some white oak dried sufficiently. White oak is a slow drying wood, I need to be patient, most of it was milled last year. Total time was surprising to me, it went quicker than I thought it would. I was at 59.5 last post. This post added 3 hrs for all the sanding/wetting/resanding/staining/resanding. Applying the finish of all 5 coats was time consuming also, another 2 hrs. So my total time start to finish was 64.9 hrs, time well spent in my book!!!!
  32. 13 points
    Been working as a Christmas Elf for the past few weeks, trying to think up some simple gifts. Made some candleholders, a few bigger pieces of furniture, some boxes based on @gee-dub continuous grain boxes, great link here... But @Gary Beasley got me thinking when he was begging for slabs from @Spanky to make some bowls. Well I'm not much of a bowl turner, but with the development of my sculpting skills I thought this might be a great gift idea. Went out to my drying piles where slabs hold down the roofing, lean against the back of a drying shed, and a few extra ones are lying around waiting to be chainsawed into fire wood. I grabbed a walnut and cherry slab along with a hunk of paulownia. After knocking off all the bark I cut the slabs into chunks and jointed/planed to thickness. The thickness was dependent on the usable wood in the hunk. Then I drew random bowl shapes onto the hunks, avoiding cracks and defects. Once again the wood dictated the shape I drew. Now it was outside my shop where I completed aggressive wood removal with the angle grinder. After a few days and some sanding, scraping and anything I had to smooth the bowl, I had 10 great looking organic shaped bowls. All the slabs were a few years old and dry, hoping no cracks develop but we'll soon find out. Here are what I saved from the fireplace; Second batch; Not bad for a few days of grinding and shaping. Thanks for looking.
  33. 13 points
    I made this for my niece's new baby boy. Just a small box from Wenge and Oak. I was trying to come up with something a little different for a handle on the lid... his name is Noah.
  34. 13 points
    This was a tough project for me, and a small tribute in my way to Krenov. Rickey's (aka Spanky) curly ambrosia maple is the star of this show and makes me look better than I am. I've said before casework is not my favorite, I've leaned more and more to the sculptured stuff the past few years. But I'd have to say this project was not only a joy to make but a real challenge. Along with the above comments, I really wanted this to be a project journal. I've come to believe when you show your work as you are doing it, you become better from the experience. I also love following project journals and I'm bummed there have been fewer and fewer on here. I didn't want to be part of the problem. And no, I'm not a facebook guy and I'm not moving over to that format, won't do it. Ok, so here goes. I did a wine cabinet a month ago, it turned out well and I had planned to use the basis of that design to make a new liquor cabinet and buffet table. The old ones I have now were made by me 20 years ago and have held up well, but are blocky and unrefined. These will be great to pass on to the kids as they move out. But I wanted to update and get more refined pieces now that my skill level has started to progress. This cabinet has the same flow and leg contours as the wine cabinet had. It's 4' high and about 30" wide. It's made out of walnut I harvested and milled my self and some beautiful curly ambrosia maple that I got from Rickey. Here are a few pictures in production stage. I took these when I thought I could still get this in a project journal. This is a pic of a side of the cabinet, the 2 legs are attached to a panel with dados via loose tenons (aka Dominos). A view of dry asembly, the second pic shows I put 3 cross supports dovetailed intro the side panels. For the drawers I used a center guide rail, I like the simplicity of this and the predictability of this; Pic with the underside of the drawer; The doors were a challenge, and I'm not the best at them. I posted on these in regards to what hinge to use. I settled on a simple solution, but I do wish I attempted a offset knife hinge. My opening wasn't perfectly square. When I put the doors in with just dry assembly, here's what I got; The gap between the doors closes when the top hinges are placed. So I used hide glue for the longer set time and for my ability to manipulate the joint; I put blue tape in the opening to prevent an "issue". Here's a pic with the top hinges in place, presto no gap left; I let these doors sit in place until the hide glue cured. Then I hand planed the hinge side of the door to develop a uniform opening from top to bottom. Since I used a no mortise hinge I needed a slight gap for the hinges. Here's the final assembly, notice the matching figure of the 2 drawers fronts; The back is shiplapped sassafras, love the smell. Did not put a finish on this. Here's a pic of the door tenon/mortise joint, a little tearout on the tenon but still a nice fit; Custom pulls that turned out great; Grain match was ok, but wasn't a knockout; The cabinet in place; Handcut dovetails in the drawers; Fully stocked! Thanks for looking!
  35. 13 points
    One of the projects to do after the dresser was a closet remodel. Some how i came up with the bright idea to make a unit that had 8 drawers in it with closet rod above and below.... I HATE making drawers. Before. Just had a single rod that was about 6' up with a shelf on top. The shelf was wasted space it just catches junk and wasn't very useful. The shelf and rod were removed but this illustrates it well enough. I scored some cherry MDF a while ago for $25 a sheet. Decided to use some of that to make this. I used birch ply for the rest to keep weight down and offer a bit more strength than MDF. I started by edge banding everything with thin strips of cherry. I clamped it on with green tape and was able to get 4 8 foot sections done in short order. I flush trimmed the banding with my router. This method works really well and quite quick. It's easy to adjust the banding if it's not strait, which mine wasn't even close to being strait. After i had everthing edged i joined the top and back together with a single domino to keep them in line. This way i could clamp a guide on both the top and the back and cut mortises for loose tenons at the same time. While i was working the domino would hold things in place so i wouldn't have to worry about bumping the piece and causing a misalignment. Vertical dividers got a dado for the middle shelf. The bottom shelves were attached with dominoes in to the sides of each vertical divider. I didn't want to just glue the bottom on to the dividers because the bottom would hold the weight of the clothing hanging and the weight of what ever is inside the bottom drawers. I figured having just the glue contention wasn't as strong as having to sheer a domino off and break the glue connection. This might be more visible in follow pictures. Case was glued up with epoxy, even with 45 min of time i was running on the ragged edge. I ran out of epoxy and had to use yellow glue for the back. In hindsight I'm glad i ran out because I'd not have had near enough and i'd have probably just tried to go thin with the epoxy and strength would have suffered. I used a couple clamps and probably should have used a couple more. I wanted to hang the closet rod from under the drawer unit but in a way where the hangers would slide with out interference from one end to another. So i devised a hook that would support the closet rod with out interference to the hangers. I made them from scrap so they don't really match but you don't see them ever. I did some strength tests on them to see if the grain direction would be problematic. I almost had to put my entire weight on 1 bracket to break it. So i figured 7 brackets should be strong enough. Drawers are all birch ply. I did cherry veneer for the faces just like for the walnut dresser i just completed. I had a 4' board so the outside 2 drawers are continuous grain that book match over the center. I then book matched the top to the bottom so it's a 4 way match. It looks real good but the closet isn't big enough to see the detail so forever only i will ever know what it looks like..... Oh yeah i used some curly cherry as well. It was one of my not so curly pieces the pictures make it look better than it really is. Mostly finished and loaded up. Some how i hit the drawer depth perfectly. I didn't need to put stops at the back. This never happens and if anything i call it a mistake because i usually try and make them a bit short so i have to install stops. The only other issue is because each drawer is in it's own tight box there is a heavy piston action. Pushing the drawers in and out is difficult on a few of them so I'll have to find a fix for that.
  36. 12 points
    OK, I love project journals, and now that I've had to close my dental office for the unforseen future, I'd thought I'd contribute to the forum again with a build. This has been a build on my list for a while. Sort of been putting it off since it's a big build, over 11 feet long. Had to build a plywood benchtop to go over my work bench and a lot of prep work needed to get the frame correct. Hopefully when this whole thing is over I'll get a chance to enjoy this build. I'll be using red cedar and paulownia for this build. The frame is made from 1/4" ply. I've had the pattern printed for a while. Started with the frame cut out. Feet were included in the pattern to suport the skeleton until the top deck is glued on. Here's a pick of the frame without the cross pieces, all the vertical lines on the pattern are where the cross pieces will be placed; Cross pieces cut and fitted to the spline; This build should go pretty quickly since I'm sequestered at home and can really focus. Next steps are to cut notches into the corners of the cross members and add strips to the frame for added gluing surface. Thanks for looking.
  37. 12 points
    Got a call from the camera store that I built the lens case for (two years ago). He wants 3 more.
  38. 12 points
    I started this Morris Chair project about 3 weeks back. I wasn't really planning on doing a detailed journal, but I have been taking photos along the way and thought I would share them here. I am making this out of Sapele. When I first started thinking about this project 3 or 4 years back I was planning on doing it in Quarter Sawn White Oak but for some reason the lumber yards around here aren't carrying much 8/4 inventory. They are nice enough to offer to order what I need but this does give me an opportunity to select my pieces. I have done some other projects in Sapele and have really enjoyed it and I think this will end up looking good. Once I got the initial dimensions down I haven't used the guild plans much, I did how ever watch the videos a few times so I guess it all the same. I am going with a little more traditional thinking in what I do so I am not tapering the legs or doing the curved feature on the bottom side of ht topside rails or the top of the bottom rails and at this time I am planning of going with the straight side pieces for the back rest. This picture below was the inspiration for my design. I saw these in Crater Lake Lodge in Oregon a few years ago They have about 15 of these that were made in the early 1900's These first picture are after a lot of the basic stuff was done. The parts are littered with my chalk and blue tape notations. I used a veneer to cover the glue line on the legs it's just a fuzz of 1/16 inch thick. This picture was before anything was sanded. After this I took it apart and numbered things in inconspicuously located spots like inside the mortise and on the tenons. Then I worked on a detail for the bottom of the bottom rails, I kind of stole or borrowed this design from Mick's chair. I also did a cut out detail in some of the slats. At this point I sanded everything to 150, I will do 180 once I am done "banging" things up and before the glue up. Everything sanded and stacked on the cart. Before I started sanding the other things I got my first arm glued up and in the bending form. I was hoping to stay away from urea and formaldehyde in the glue I used for this so I was looking around at information on the internet, then while listening to one of Phillip Morley's podcast, he mentioned that he used Unibond One for veneer work and he was real happy with it and it doesn't contain anything that makes you worry. Well now I am telling you I am REAL happy with Unibond One. It did a great job, I had just a strong 1/16 worth of spring back and my glue lines are non existent, I am just real pleased with how they came out. I was prepared to do an edge veneer on the arms to hide glue lines if I had to but no need now. Close up of the arm sitting arch up on my saw table. Both arms all cleaned up and cut to size.
  39. 12 points
    For those of us that do believe, I wish each and everyone of you a very Merry Christmas!!! For those of you that are unsure, to you I hope the holiday off finds you well and happy.!
  40. 12 points
    Just spent a very enjoyable few hours with @Ronn W when he stopped by on his way to Marc Adams woodworking school in Indiana. A great bowl of chili and some homemade sourdough bread with cupcakes for desert. Lots of great conversation covering all topics but mostly woodworking, thanks for coming by Ronn it was a great time and good to see you again.
  41. 12 points
    Been busy on this but haven't updated because I've been too busy to transfer images and what not. This will be a longer post. I also missed some picture so sorry if it's word heavy and not picture heavy. So i got the sides cut and sanded a while ago, then i got an order for 8 of those game boards i make so i dropped everything and batched those out. I spray them with the HVLP and i HATE doing that in my shop. Coming back to the table I needed to get a top and bottom rail for the ends and make a way to hold everything in the shape that i want it to. The sides are like an accordion so if you just let them go the snap back. I remember the trick from the Morris chair build where Marc makes a groove in the side tails and fills in the gaps with pieces of wood. During my build I took that one step further and cut a gap between the two pieces and used that so the grain match would be better. I did the exact same thing here. The sides ended up being 1/2" thick and instead of tring to dial in a dado stack perfectly to a random dimension I grabbed the Kerf master and had a perfect dado the first try. So i took the rails and got groovy. Then i needed to prep the stock that would act as a space and make the rails look a bit better. I used the planer to get close and then nailed the fit with my hand plane. To cut the strips I used my miter gauge on the table saw. With a ZCI on both the gauge and the throat plate it made this small work easy. I made all but one of the cuts to a dimension. For the last cut I put everthing together and used the piece to mark the exact length for the final cut. This way if my measurements were slightly off i wouldn't get a huge gap. I still got a little gap but it's from some extra sanding i did after the fact. Getting the spacing set and gluing the parts in was VERY tricky but i managed it. There is no trick or easy way to do it. You just have to take your time and make sure to keep your parts organized. I used numbers and letters on various parts so nothing could get mixed up. I had the internal pieces a bit proud of the surface to allow some fitment and figured i could just flush them up after the fact. To flush them up I just ran the piece through the table saw leaving a hair extra and then finished everything with the smoothing plane. When I finished the first one I noticed that there were some gaps on the side. I wasn't totally thrilled with this but I'm too far along now. So i used a clamp on the sides to squeeze the grove together. The following pieces the gaps disappeared. I guess the side was just a bit to thin. In the following picture you can see how well the rain matches up. By now I had to think about Joinery. I intended the sides to be the perfect width to allow for good space around a domino but still be nice and petite looking. Turns out I didn't account for the grove for the decorative side. I had to put everything together and plunge the mortise with the decorative sides in place. There isn't a ton of extra room around the mortise but everything ended up fitting ok. I took extra care to make sure the locations were nailed as i won't be able to use a wider mortise on the mating side as the shoulder won't cover it up. With the joiner done i could do a test fit of the sides. Now that the joiner is done it's time to do details. I didn't take pictures of this but that's ok it's pretty mundane. I wanted the main long rails to have a design similar to the sides so i used a drawing bow and tried to replicate that as best possible. I think it turned out well, subtle, but well. I cut to the line on the bandsaw and cleaned up with a spoke shave. I have been getting better with the spoke shave and am able to get a near surface ready finish with it. I'm not there yet but I've been able to remove most chatter marks with 120 grit instead of needing to really go at it with 80 grit. I want to have a lower stretcher like most of the furniture in the room. it does 2 jobs: 1. I like the look of it 2. it adds a bit of strength to the piece and a bit of piece of mind that i can use it as a ladder when i need to.... . I wanted to use some thicker materiel but didn't want the look of thick material. I knew this would be low to the ground so I'm using a trick of the eye. I put a pencil 1/4" up from the bottom and 3/4" in from the sides and used my hand plane to connect the 2 lines making a 20 degree ish chamfer on the bottom. The picture above shows the lines but they may be hard to see. I did a full dry assembly and something was off. I didn't like the curves and delicate look of the whole project and the contrast of the square plain legs. So i grabbed the french curve and put a decorate foot on the bottom of each leg. Again I didn't take pictures of this but it was as simple as cut the line and clean up with a spoke shave. Assembly!!! The ling sides i wanted glued to the legs. This was more tricky than i thought with the weird decorative sides. I ended up having to wedge some stuff in there to be able to throw a clamp on. You can see the sand paper and it's hard to make out but i used the french curve and my paloni pocket ruler on the left side. That ruler is SUPER useful! Oh as usual prior to assembly i did my usual sanding to #4 grit. If you are unfamiliar with #4 grit, it's 3 passes with a smoothing plane and your done cause sanding sucks. Tonight was coat 1 of finish. When i get this fully done I'll take some pictures of the room with the tables and I'll take this table outside and get some good pictures with a less busy background. It's HARD to see the details with all that clutter behind the image, my apologies.
  42. 12 points
    We have a new addition to the family! I don't know about you guys, but the drive home from the hospital is nerve wracking. I don't think I exhaled for two hours. Gotta say though, SCM knows how to build a car seat! Once we got it home I could breathe a sigh of relief. A 765 lb baby is not easy to handle. 848 lbs in its car seat! They're so cute when they sleep. Whoa! Pulled herself right up! Settling right in! Beautiful baby if I do say so!
  43. 12 points
    Just completed this table/bookcase. Made from white oak. Was my first adventure in through tenons. Think they turned out pretty good. Finish was a challenge, tried some tinted shellac, and then bailed out on that. Went with just a oil based stain then some wipe on poly. This will go to the entry way at church to hold bulletins, hand outs and some books.
  44. 12 points
    Last week I got to fulfill something on my bucket list. I was able to spend a week taking a class with Chuck Bender working on a Massachusetts serpentine chest. Last August I was diagnosed with prostate cancer, and when the shock wore off, the only thing that I could think that I would like to do would be to take a woodworking class with a professional. Thankfully surgery went well, and after 2 check ups since, no more cancer. While I was home recuperating I stumbled upon Chucks blog and saw that he had moved back to Jim Thorpe Pa. and was offering classes. The minute I saw the picture of the chest I knew I wanted to take the class. Had to borrow from my 401k to swing it but having just hearing a doctor tell me I had cancer I figured I can't take it with me. Chuck is one of the nicest people I have met. Very patient teacher, great sense of humor. And oh, an amazingly talented woodworker. We weren't able to finish the chest in the 5 days and Chuck graciously offer for us to come back on a weekend in November so that he could help us finish. Thank goodness because I definitely don't have the skills yet to finish the chest on my own. Just kinda wanted to share as I felt like this was a big step forward in woodworking for me and this was the first forum. I ever participated in.
  45. 12 points
    Fairly simple monitor riser I made for my desk at work. I used a lot of suggestions from you guys on this project. All in all this simple thing took an incredible amount of time. Not only because life has been extremely busy which makes getting shop time hard but because I am apparently just a slow woodworker. I would love to just chalk my slowness up me always trying new techniques and joinery for the first time but if I am honest with myself I just don't have a very fast pace. But I suppose the slow pace is a good percent of the enjoyment for me. I have a stressful job and two young kids so I am "GO GO GO" all the time. Getting to take her easy in the shop is often needed. So if you can't tell from the angle this is red oak. Specifically it is that really wide board on top of the pile. That was about 11" wide. I got that pile for $100 from some guy on OfferUp. It was a really good deal that I felt that I could not pass up, but I am actually not that big of a fan of red oak. I find the natural color to be a bit bleh and I really don't like the tiger stripe effect that happens when staining red oak. But I have a pile of it so I decided that I just need to find a way to like it. I only have a 6" jointer so the only way to flatten this board with my current set of tools will be by hand. I just needed to get one side flat enough to run through the planer. This board has some challenges. It is cupped and bowed. Not only bowed but bowed in two directions, kind of like a very subtle letter "S". It also has reversing grain. Boy was I in over my head here. I have never tried to flatten a board this wide, and I have never tried to flatten a board this long. But I have the tools to do it so I grabbed my scrub plane and got after it. I tried and tried to get this darn board flat across it's entire length but I just have not quite developed the skill to do that on such a long wide board. What I ended up doing was cutting the board shorter. A shorter board is easier to flatten than a long board. My intent was for this riser to be around 70" long, I had to throw that out the window if I wanted to use this board. But I got it done eventually. I used the table saw to cut the miters, I taped them real good to create a tape hinge. The clamping setup was a bit awkward and I actually applied a little too much clamping pressure and pulled the tape hinge on one side open just a bit. I hit you guys on these forums up on what to do to fix it. You guys gave me the burnisher technique which worked like a charm. Thanks for that everyone. While the glue was drying on the miters I milled and fit the "front". I cut the angles by hand just to see if I could do it (I also had plenty of red oak in case I screwed it up) and to my surprise it worked great. For the dividers/supports I wanted to use a dado joint instead of just a butt joint....you know.....because I'm fancy. I also wanted to try cutting these by hand all Derek Cohen style. Now I don't have Derek's Azbiki saw. And I don't have Derek's cool magnetic saw guide. Nor do I have his experience. Or skill. Or know how. So needless to say these did not turn out quite as nice as Derek's hand cut dados do in his build journals. But they turned out ok. One was just a bit tighter than I would have liked. The other one was a bit looser than I would have liked. Both of them were not as clean as I would have liked. But these are on the underside so who cares. They are solid and look good from the front. I had left these supports/dividers a bit long so I needed to trim them down. I decided that cutting these by hand would be much quicker than pulling out my table saw and cleaning it off so taking great care I marked the line and got to cutting. This is a longish cut to do free hand for me so I was nervous about it. I wanted to cheat and cut on the waste side of the line by a lot then just plain down to the line, but Chrisopher Shwarz (my favorite woodworker.......and spirit animal) says that "If you can see the line, you can cut to the line, any line." So I put on my big boy pants and gave it shot. Turned out not too bad. Just had to clean them up a little bit with the plane. Why am I including such a small detail like cutting a couple of boards? I'm not sure why but these cuts were a big deal to me. For me, half the joy of woodworking is learning the skills. So being able to free hand a long cut like this meant a lot to me. I'm far from an expert or anything close to being an expert but pulling off this cut was the proof in the pudding that I am learning the skills. You know the whole dopamine reward of setting a goal for yourself and achieving it thing. This was one of those small things that meant a lot. Glued in the dividers and glued on the front. Now I need to figure out how to finish this red oak in a way that I would not hate it. I decided I wanted to try tinting shellac. So I went to Woodcraft and bought some shellac flakes and some Transtint dye. Then I went to a thrift store and got super lucky, the first thrift store I went to had a digital food scale, a coffee grinder and glass jars. Now to teach myself how to shellac! I tried lots of different combinations on some scraps. I tried using a sealer coat then the dyed shellac over that. I tried using just dyed shellac. Shellac with just a little bit of dye. Shellac with lots and lots of dye. Just about all of these combinations ended up with tiger striping. I took all these samples to work to see which would look best with my desk. I was not trying to match my desk I just wanted a color/tone that would compliment it. And you know what combination looked the best? No combination. Just regular amber shellac with no dye at all. Shellac has a bit of a learning curve but I think I got it. I wish this picture did this justice. The amber shellac makes this red oak glow. So I think I may have found a way to like red oak after all. Which is good because I have a lot of it. Last I am adding a slot for cable management. Doing this after finishing was a huge mistake. I was so nervous the whole time that I was going to scratch the crap out of it. But I was extremely careful and got through it without incident. Chopped out the waste with a chisel. Then hit the whole thing with steel wool then finally a coat of wax. I don't remember where I heard that you should wax everything but I am so glad that I heard it. Wax just makes whatever finish I do better. And with that I was done. Just needed to bring it to work and take some glamour shots. So here they are. Thanks for checking out this small build. Of course suggestions and criticisms are welcome, just be gentle I have a fragile ego.
  46. 12 points
    I built this shelf out of off the rack red oak a few years ago. I saw all this curl in the back of the pile and bought the whole board. Used Marc’s recipe for popping the grain. I think it turned out well. I have no beef with red oak.
  47. 11 points
    I've been away from the workshop for a month, travelling around a few cities in Austria and Germany, as well as Prague. It was a good trip, but it's great to be home. The current build was on hold. This is the entry hall table my niece asked me to build ... ... and this is where we left off last time - ready to fit the first corner ... Past builds: Part 1: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/EntryHallTableForANiece1.html Part 2: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/EntryHallTableForANiece2.html Today we shall put the complete case together. What I wish to focus on is the dovetailing. Not just any dovetailing, but mitred through dovetailing in unforgiving hardwood (here, Fiddleback Jarrah). Of all the commonly used dovetails, I consider the through dovetail more difficult than the half-blind dovetail. Why ... because two sides are exposed against the single face of the half-blind. In my opinion, by mitering the ends, the level of complexity is tripled .. at least. Not only are there three faces now, but each needs to be dimensioned perfectly, otherwise each is affected in turn. This is more difficult than a secret mitred dovetail, where mistakes may be hidden. I have posted before on building the mitred though dovetail, and it is not my intention to do this again. Instead, what I wish to show are the tuning tricks to get it right. This is the model of the tail- and pin boards … In a wide case, such as this, it is critical that the parts go together ideally off the saw or, at least, require minimal adjustment. The more adjustments one makes, the more the dovetails will look ragged. Tail boards are straightforward. Let’s consider this done. Once the transfer of tails to pins is completed, the vital area is sawing the vertical lines … well, perfectly vertical. I use blue tape in transferring the marks. The first saw cut is flat against the tape. Note that the harder the wood, the less compression there will be, and so the tail-pin fit needs to be spot on. Where you saw offers an opportunity for ensuring a good fit: if you hug the line (edge of the tape), you get a tight fit. If you encroach a smidgeon over the line, you loosen the fit slightly. Saw diagionally, using the vertical line as your target … Only then level the saw and complete the cut … I do not plan to discuss removing the waste. That was demonstrated in Part 2. So, the next important area is the mitre. These are scribed, and then I use a crosscut saw to remove the waste about 1mm above the line on both the tail- and pin boards … Now we are ready to test-fit the boards … Mmmm …. not a great fit … … even though the mitres at the sides are tight … The problem is that the mitres are fat, and the extra thickness is holding the boards apart … Even sawing to the lines here is likely to leave some fat, which is why it is a waste of energy to try and saw to the line in this instance. It needs to be pared away with a chisel, using a 45-degree fixture. As tempting and logical as it seems to pare straight down the guide … … what I experience is that the chisel will skip over the surface of the hard wood rather than digging in and cutting it away. What is more successful is to pare at an angle, and let the corner of the bevel catch the wood … This is what you are aiming for … Okay, we do this. And this is the result … Not bad. But not good enough. There is a slight gap at each side, quite fine, but evident close up. The source is traced to the mitre not being clean enough. It is like sharpening a blade – look for the light on the edge. If it is there, the blade is not sharp. If there is a slight amount of waste on the mitre, the case will not close up. To clear this, instead of a chisel – which is tricky to use for such a small amount – I choose to use a file. This file has the teeth on the sides ground off to create “safe” sides. Try again. The fit is now very good. I will stop there. So, this is the stage of the project: the case is completed. This is a dry fit … One end … The other … The waterfall can be seen, even without being smoothed and finished … Regards from Perth Derek
  48. 11 points
    With the recent completion of the Guild miter station build, I'm stoked about the organization, cleanliness and general productivity of my shop. I sent emails out to my favorite woodworking companies - those with whom I've spent a good deal of money patronizing over the years. A small handful sent back meaningful (not from automated systems) replies. This post is a shout out to Whiteside - who graciously sent me a banner to hang in my new shop and a T-shirt in my size. Whiteside makes absolutely fantastic router bits and I was really pleased to see them so responsive to the me / part of the microcosm that uses their products. General comments on the Guild build This is my first time making actual cabinets and it was a huge confidence builder. I will definitely be doing more. I deleted part of the original plans as I had limited space. Still worked out really nicely. Took 5 sheets of plywood if you're trying to accomplish something similar. I used the table saw entirely to make the cabinet doors and would encourage all to do so - the method employed in the Guild build uses the Domino leaves "gaps" in the doors - the table saw method is easy and leaves no gaps. I left space between the signs, cabinets, etc for a set of upper cabinets to be built soon. Everything was finished with satin Arm-R-Seal Other than that, AMA (ask me anything)
  49. 11 points
    So the tables are DONE! I was going to do 4 coats of finish but the 3rd was so nice and smooth i decided to stop there. I took the table outside and got some better pictures so the details are easier to see. I'm really happy with how thin the lower rail looks. It's like 7/8" thick but looks like 1/2". I could probably stand on it. The table overall is VERY light weight. Which it should be given it's very small 8"x 30". Here it is in place. I need to make some new rear speakers to match the front ones. I also need to do some touchup work on the front speakers as the finish started to fail in a couple spots from water because plants. I took a few pictures of the all the other tables in the room. The duplicate table which was first is hidden under a mountain of game boards and tucked behind the morris chairs. The sub table is tucked in the corner and usually has a blanket basket pushed up against it. All you ever see is the top. Which is good because the base is not attractive, it's not bad either though just meh. My next project is going to be very obvious from the next picture. All of that nice furniture and our dining room chairs are cheap folding chairs....
  50. 11 points
    Finished up the Fremont File Cabinet this morning. More hours in it than I had anticipated, but I'm happy with the results and I learned a great deal. Thanks to Marc and Darrell for the great video and detailed Guild build!