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  1. 19 points
    I have been rather busy with my career for the past few months. I try to spend my free time working on projects, leaving me little time to interact with WoodTalk community. My hope is to make some time for WoodTalk forum this year. I have been reading posts but not posting much. So, it is time to get caught up. Here are some of the projects I have worked on since last June. I made two jewelry cabinets for my daughters. One is inspired by a box made by Matt Kenny. The second one is based on a design by Kyle Toth. I chose this project because I had just one board of sycamore. I added padauk and basswood complete the project. The above piece is made from QS sapele and tiger maple, with yellow poplar as the secondary wood. I made these Chippendale style mirrors to test out my new DeWalt scroll saw. The lumber here is Hoduran mahogany with pommele sapele veneer. It has a garnet Shellac spray finish. In going through my lumber collection, I found a single flame birch board. I decided to make a table for my daughter who is a fan of mid-century modern furniture. I saw a table like this one in Instagram and made my version of it. The big project for me was a chest of drawers based on an article in FWW. It is Japanese styling and I made it out of cherry. The main challenge was that the sides and front are both sloped by about 4 degrees. In the end, it turned out OK. I gave it to my son, who is in college. He has a keen appreciation for fine furniture. The back of the piece is probably overkill but it does look pretty. The finish on this piece is wash coat of shellac followed by 4 coats of Satin Arm-R-Seal. The hardware is hand forged. Thanks for viewing.
  2. 18 points
    This was a fun build, and it really shows off Rickey's (aka Spanky) curly ambrosia maple. I was inspired to do this piece after seeing some nice buffet designs and builds on this site. Why would a buffet design inspire this piece, well this piece will match my future buffet table/cabinet! I also plan to build a matching liquor cabinet to match this piece. That liquor cabinet is just getting started and if I can get my act together I wanted to post a journal with that. Now for those that have seen some of my work, you know I lean more toward a Maloof/sculptured design. I had to incorporate some flowing lines in this piece but it's a lot more traditional than Maloof stuff. I still find this look appealing. Spanky's curly ambrosia really looks great with the walnut, and my liquor cabinet will incorporate these two woods also. Fully stocked in this photo; Drawer dovetail were handcut and run on a center guide. Really like the way these woods work together; From the side view you can really appreciate the curves in this piece; Thanks for looking.
  3. 17 points
    My daughter and her husband just purchased a home in Fairfax Va. and wanted some federal style furniture to add to her collection . I just finished what I hope will be the final two pieces.
  4. 15 points
    Loving the fact that Coop just posted a great Maloof Low Back Chair. Always happy to see other sculptured pieces on here. Just finished this Walnut Maloof Rocker, as I've stated before, my hands down favorite all time woodworking project. This is my third rocker and my first in walnut. I started this rocker the last week in April, and it was a double build, meaning I am building 2 at the same time. The other rocker is cherry and it's still in the shop waiting for final assembly and final sanding. For those that have done these, you know that final sanding is no small or simple step. My sanding goes to 400 grit before applying finish and I use 0000 steel wool to apply a few coats of the finish. My finish of preference is 3 coats oil/poly mix followed by 2 coats oil/wax mix. Didn't use Osmo for this rocker, but I will likely try that on a rocker in the future. This build went very smoothly, minimal issues. I've have some small details I'm learning to refine with this build, I'll try to point out those small details, but for the most part it looks like most other Maloof rockers. Countless times I've looked up this rocker online and through other venues, and it's easy to make this piece look clunky. I've seen it done with flawless woodworking technique, but it didn't look organic, flowing, or inviting. Hopefully you don't think that when you look at this piece. A perfect pose, the rocker next to a Maloof style table with a Maloof book to inspire you. A few details I like in these rockers. First, I really like the horns, these are time consuming to develop, but worth it in my opinion. Die grinder does a lot of the work, then a lot of scraping and sanding; The crest of the head rest needs to flow into the front of the horn, you can see the line from the front edge of the horn detail blend into the top edge of the head rest. Head rest and horn from the front, again a line that needs to flow; The underside of the headrest to back leg is also an area that takes a lot of work to blend. A rasp and a lot of hand sanding is the only way to get this done. I like the middle of the headrest to project down, I like this look much better than the continuous sweep you see in a lot of the rockers; This side view of the head rest shows the sweep and contours; The arm to back leg joint is pretty straight forward and easy to shape. Key is to make it look fluid and continuous. The interesting part of this joint is on the inside. This is a common feature seen in the original chair that is often duplicated. This gives the look as if the arm was carved from the back leg. The arm to front leg joint takes a lot of work, as you have end grain and long grain you are blending together. I don't like the big paddle shaped arms you often see on most of these rockers. I like a more narrow arm and with it converging more as it approaches the back leg. The shaping of the arm is a lot of work also, but Marc does a great job in his build guiding one through the process. So much is made of the leg to seat joint in this piece. I find that to be pretty straight forward when you use the paired router bits. Shaping these joints are harder than doing the joint. And this by far is the toughest area to shape. Finally, the leg to rocker joints. The joints that give me the biggest pucker factor. Drilling thru the rocker into the back leg, after you have spent weeks on the chair is the absolute most tense moment of this build. The good thing is after you have shaped the whole chair, shaping the legs to the rocker is one of the easiest areas to shape. The detail I add in the front is from Marc's build and I like it, you leave a little extra in front of the leg to converge that excess into a point, sweeping up from the underside and in from the sides. Thanks for looking.
  5. 15 points
    This is a bowl that my wife, Marcia, made. It's made form two pieces of Khaya (African mahogany) sandwiching a thin piece of zebra wood. The rim and stem are accented with Inca Gold Gilder's Paste. The design and work are her own. I consulted on the project, but surprisingly little. Don't know about you all, but I was impressed.
  6. 14 points
    Here is the piece I have been working on these last few weeks. (Thanks again to those who helped me with a couple of urgent matters that arose). I have a few name ideas I'm considering, but haven't settled on one yet. I plan to take this to the American Association of Woodturners meeting later this month, so I have a little time on that. Technique is the same as I have described before, although this time I cut back the sides to slim the pillars and accentuate the shape.
  7. 14 points
    I did not fully document this build but wnated to share a few pics. All solid cherry except for the back which is cherry veneer on plywood and the center the crown which is wanut veneer on plywood. New techniques and methods for this project are the crown and the base. My goal was to have the clock face appear to be floating in mid air. s0, for those of you familiar with clock mechanisms, this is a front mounted mechanism but it is mounted to a frame that is mounted to the rear of the case. Working on the crown... Case....The case is dovetailed but they are all hidden in the completed piece. oh well, it was good practice. Door Box that suports the mechanism mechanism is removable from the front (lift and pull) Pics of completed clock.......all that's left is to adjust the timing over the next few days.
  8. 13 points
    I started this a good while back but chose not to do a build on it as I figured it might go into the fire pit at anytime during the build and it came close several times. My daughter asked for a chair for her desk and I have always wanted to try it so I gave it a go. Initially it was going to be built from some walnut I cut and dried and I figured I would do a prototype from some cherry. After several months of wrestling with it, I don’t foresee a walnut chair in the future. Plans were ordered from Charles Brock and I picked up several pointers from Marc’s rocking chair build. Three coats of ARS glossy and three coats of GF top coat. The only places I’m not real pleased with are the arm to leg joints.
  9. 13 points
    Well I dove into the deep end of the pool tonight and entered my first piece (Jewelry Chest) into the Minnesota Woodworkers Guild annual Northern Woods Exhibition April 25-28th This is way out of my comfort zone but in an effort to push myself even further in my woodworking I thought it might be helpful to get feedback from woodworkers much more talented than I as well as from the public. Here's hoping I don't regret this LOL
  10. 13 points
    One of the projects to do after the dresser was a closet remodel. Some how i came up with the bright idea to make a unit that had 8 drawers in it with closet rod above and below.... I HATE making drawers. Before. Just had a single rod that was about 6' up with a shelf on top. The shelf was wasted space it just catches junk and wasn't very useful. The shelf and rod were removed but this illustrates it well enough. I scored some cherry MDF a while ago for $25 a sheet. Decided to use some of that to make this. I used birch ply for the rest to keep weight down and offer a bit more strength than MDF. I started by edge banding everything with thin strips of cherry. I clamped it on with green tape and was able to get 4 8 foot sections done in short order. I flush trimmed the banding with my router. This method works really well and quite quick. It's easy to adjust the banding if it's not strait, which mine wasn't even close to being strait. After i had everthing edged i joined the top and back together with a single domino to keep them in line. This way i could clamp a guide on both the top and the back and cut mortises for loose tenons at the same time. While i was working the domino would hold things in place so i wouldn't have to worry about bumping the piece and causing a misalignment. Vertical dividers got a dado for the middle shelf. The bottom shelves were attached with dominoes in to the sides of each vertical divider. I didn't want to just glue the bottom on to the dividers because the bottom would hold the weight of the clothing hanging and the weight of what ever is inside the bottom drawers. I figured having just the glue contention wasn't as strong as having to sheer a domino off and break the glue connection. This might be more visible in follow pictures. Case was glued up with epoxy, even with 45 min of time i was running on the ragged edge. I ran out of epoxy and had to use yellow glue for the back. In hindsight I'm glad i ran out because I'd not have had near enough and i'd have probably just tried to go thin with the epoxy and strength would have suffered. I used a couple clamps and probably should have used a couple more. I wanted to hang the closet rod from under the drawer unit but in a way where the hangers would slide with out interference from one end to another. So i devised a hook that would support the closet rod with out interference to the hangers. I made them from scrap so they don't really match but you don't see them ever. I did some strength tests on them to see if the grain direction would be problematic. I almost had to put my entire weight on 1 bracket to break it. So i figured 7 brackets should be strong enough. Drawers are all birch ply. I did cherry veneer for the faces just like for the walnut dresser i just completed. I had a 4' board so the outside 2 drawers are continuous grain that book match over the center. I then book matched the top to the bottom so it's a 4 way match. It looks real good but the closet isn't big enough to see the detail so forever only i will ever know what it looks like..... Oh yeah i used some curly cherry as well. It was one of my not so curly pieces the pictures make it look better than it really is. Mostly finished and loaded up. Some how i hit the drawer depth perfectly. I didn't need to put stops at the back. This never happens and if anything i call it a mistake because i usually try and make them a bit short so i have to install stops. The only other issue is because each drawer is in it's own tight box there is a heavy piston action. Pushing the drawers in and out is difficult on a few of them so I'll have to find a fix for that.
  11. 12 points
    My wife requested a side table for the family room. This will be situated between two arm chairs, and replace the small table (which is too high and dominating) ... Not just a side table, but it also needed to house her needlework thingies. In other words, shallow drawers for cotton reels and sewing kit. I played around with several ideas, and eventually came up with a design that borrows a little from a piece I recently made. Lynndy liked the softness of the rounded dovetails and overall dimension of this coffee table I built some months back for a nephew ... The plan (looking down) would be to create a curved front and back, with round, splayed legs to the outside (an alternative is a straight, tapered round leg) ... In contrast to the Jarrah in that piece, the carcase will be built in Hard Maple, dovetailed and mitred at each corner. It will feature 8 drawers. All drawer fronts will curve as well. The reason for "Harlequin" in the title is that the drawers will be a mix of woods, as depicted in the elevation of the drawer section ... A harlequin design is often thought of as a diamond pattern, but does also include a rectangular checkerboard. Anyway, it's just a name, and I like giving my pieces a name At this stage I have chosen for the drawer fronts Black Walnut and Blue Gum. I may also add in Hard Maple. Always interested in your thoughts here. The Blue Gum is lighter than the Black Walnut and is a good foil against the Hard Maple … The legs will taper and curve from the carcase, attached with a loose mortice and tenon ... The sides and top were arranged so that the grain flowed continuously. The carcase is 20mm thick, 800mm long and 350 at the wide, centre point .. The initial dovetail plan was to keep the boards parallel and saw the curves later. It became apparent when joining the first set that this would not work ... .. there would be too much at the sides to mitre, and so I decided to shape the top and bottom panels at this stage rather than later. This was the first opportunity to use the modification I made to my Moxon vise (see article: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/NewMoxonMods.html). It now enables the pin- and tail boards to be clamped together to aid in marking out (see earlier photo). In marking out for mitred corners, the side tails are not sawn out from the front ... ... the board is reversed, and the mitres are marked ... ... and sawn ... The reason I had wanted to retain square carcase sides was that it would make it easier to square the chisel guide for the mitres. I got around this by squaring them to the front of the carcase ... The pin board is seen here ... One of the difficulties in fitting this many tails and pins is that any slight errors are magnified. The fit below illustrates that the left side is too tight ... To deal with this, the tails were given a pencil scribbling ... Fitting the board together left this behind ... This process needed to be done once more, before the fit was satisfactory ... The four sides were dry fitted together, and the front and rear upper and lower panels planed to shape (this was close but not enough) … All is coplanar … Where we are up to at the end of today … One set of mitred corners … … and the other … Next up is building the internal dividers for the drawers. Regards from Perth Derek
  12. 12 points
    Fairly simple monitor riser I made for my desk at work. I used a lot of suggestions from you guys on this project. All in all this simple thing took an incredible amount of time. Not only because life has been extremely busy which makes getting shop time hard but because I am apparently just a slow woodworker. I would love to just chalk my slowness up me always trying new techniques and joinery for the first time but if I am honest with myself I just don't have a very fast pace. But I suppose the slow pace is a good percent of the enjoyment for me. I have a stressful job and two young kids so I am "GO GO GO" all the time. Getting to take her easy in the shop is often needed. So if you can't tell from the angle this is red oak. Specifically it is that really wide board on top of the pile. That was about 11" wide. I got that pile for $100 from some guy on OfferUp. It was a really good deal that I felt that I could not pass up, but I am actually not that big of a fan of red oak. I find the natural color to be a bit bleh and I really don't like the tiger stripe effect that happens when staining red oak. But I have a pile of it so I decided that I just need to find a way to like it. I only have a 6" jointer so the only way to flatten this board with my current set of tools will be by hand. I just needed to get one side flat enough to run through the planer. This board has some challenges. It is cupped and bowed. Not only bowed but bowed in two directions, kind of like a very subtle letter "S". It also has reversing grain. Boy was I in over my head here. I have never tried to flatten a board this wide, and I have never tried to flatten a board this long. But I have the tools to do it so I grabbed my scrub plane and got after it. I tried and tried to get this darn board flat across it's entire length but I just have not quite developed the skill to do that on such a long wide board. What I ended up doing was cutting the board shorter. A shorter board is easier to flatten than a long board. My intent was for this riser to be around 70" long, I had to throw that out the window if I wanted to use this board. But I got it done eventually. I used the table saw to cut the miters, I taped them real good to create a tape hinge. The clamping setup was a bit awkward and I actually applied a little too much clamping pressure and pulled the tape hinge on one side open just a bit. I hit you guys on these forums up on what to do to fix it. You guys gave me the burnisher technique which worked like a charm. Thanks for that everyone. While the glue was drying on the miters I milled and fit the "front". I cut the angles by hand just to see if I could do it (I also had plenty of red oak in case I screwed it up) and to my surprise it worked great. For the dividers/supports I wanted to use a dado joint instead of just a butt joint....you know.....because I'm fancy. I also wanted to try cutting these by hand all Derek Cohen style. Now I don't have Derek's Azbiki saw. And I don't have Derek's cool magnetic saw guide. Nor do I have his experience. Or skill. Or know how. So needless to say these did not turn out quite as nice as Derek's hand cut dados do in his build journals. But they turned out ok. One was just a bit tighter than I would have liked. The other one was a bit looser than I would have liked. Both of them were not as clean as I would have liked. But these are on the underside so who cares. They are solid and look good from the front. I had left these supports/dividers a bit long so I needed to trim them down. I decided that cutting these by hand would be much quicker than pulling out my table saw and cleaning it off so taking great care I marked the line and got to cutting. This is a longish cut to do free hand for me so I was nervous about it. I wanted to cheat and cut on the waste side of the line by a lot then just plain down to the line, but Chrisopher Shwarz (my favorite woodworker.......and spirit animal) says that "If you can see the line, you can cut to the line, any line." So I put on my big boy pants and gave it shot. Turned out not too bad. Just had to clean them up a little bit with the plane. Why am I including such a small detail like cutting a couple of boards? I'm not sure why but these cuts were a big deal to me. For me, half the joy of woodworking is learning the skills. So being able to free hand a long cut like this meant a lot to me. I'm far from an expert or anything close to being an expert but pulling off this cut was the proof in the pudding that I am learning the skills. You know the whole dopamine reward of setting a goal for yourself and achieving it thing. This was one of those small things that meant a lot. Glued in the dividers and glued on the front. Now I need to figure out how to finish this red oak in a way that I would not hate it. I decided I wanted to try tinting shellac. So I went to Woodcraft and bought some shellac flakes and some Transtint dye. Then I went to a thrift store and got super lucky, the first thrift store I went to had a digital food scale, a coffee grinder and glass jars. Now to teach myself how to shellac! I tried lots of different combinations on some scraps. I tried using a sealer coat then the dyed shellac over that. I tried using just dyed shellac. Shellac with just a little bit of dye. Shellac with lots and lots of dye. Just about all of these combinations ended up with tiger striping. I took all these samples to work to see which would look best with my desk. I was not trying to match my desk I just wanted a color/tone that would compliment it. And you know what combination looked the best? No combination. Just regular amber shellac with no dye at all. Shellac has a bit of a learning curve but I think I got it. I wish this picture did this justice. The amber shellac makes this red oak glow. So I think I may have found a way to like red oak after all. Which is good because I have a lot of it. Last I am adding a slot for cable management. Doing this after finishing was a huge mistake. I was so nervous the whole time that I was going to scratch the crap out of it. But I was extremely careful and got through it without incident. Chopped out the waste with a chisel. Then hit the whole thing with steel wool then finally a coat of wax. I don't remember where I heard that you should wax everything but I am so glad that I heard it. Wax just makes whatever finish I do better. And with that I was done. Just needed to bring it to work and take some glamour shots. So here they are. Thanks for checking out this small build. Of course suggestions and criticisms are welcome, just be gentle I have a fragile ego.
  13. 11 points
    I've posted previously that we were very fortunate to host Darrell Peart for a weekend workshop a couple of weeks back. The seminar was great. I know everyone left with a better understanding and appreciation for what all goes into a Greene and Greene style piece. I had been planning on making a side table for the Morris chair I finished last year and thought the Fremont night stand would be a great piece to go with it. Unfortunately the space isn't wide enough to fit it in, so I'm thinking maybe Darrell's Tercet table might work better. In the meantime, we have a file cabinet that doesn't go with anything else in the room. I've modified the Guild's Fremont night stand plans to use as a file cabinet replacement as my next project. Line drawing elevations: I'm going back and forth on deciding whether to have the doors swing open or be attached to the file drawers behind them. I have a space limitation on the left door swing, so I may attach them. Back view Side view CNC router cut templates. Starting the rough milling process. The thicker stock is 9/4 so I'll resaw it down to yield the 6/4 final thickness for the legs and use the thinner cutoff for the drawers. The wider 4/4 boards will get resawed for veneering the panels. My plan is to use traditional wooden runners for the upper drawers and Blum undermount Blumotion slides for the file drawers. Should be a fun project for me!
  14. 11 points
    Finished up the Fremont File Cabinet this morning. More hours in it than I had anticipated, but I'm happy with the results and I learned a great deal. Thanks to Marc and Darrell for the great video and detailed Guild build!
  15. 11 points
    Progress! I've applied finish (ARS) and mounted the doors. The doors aren't perfect by any means. I screwed up when gluing up the outer doors. I didn't follow Matt's advice to use the main cabinet as a template for gluing the doors to ensure consistent geometry. I simply forgot to do it in my rush to get them glued up. The end result is that outer doors are slightly out of square relative to the inner doors and main cabinet. Having said that, they hang and swing nicely, so overall I'm happy. As well my drawers are recycled from a previous project, so they don't fit exactly, but are fully functional. I still have to make all the tool holders, but at least it's on the wall now...
  16. 11 points
    Had to replace my hard drive which put me way behind on updating this project. I'll get to it soon. In the meantime - I'm really happy that I talked myself into the 16" jointer over the 12". Pretty much at capacity! And the surface finish is really nice - no tearout (cutters are still on the original edge after 1 1/2 years of use) and lots of chatoyance! Love this machine!
  17. 11 points
    Well @Spanky here it is at long last, something from that piece of box elder you gave me. When I got the protective paint off the original piece of wood there were some natural cracks and bark inclusions that dictated cutting out a smaller piece of wood to turn. Ultimately "A Different Angle" was made from the "filet" of the board, but as I was trying out ideas and cutting the board down I decided that I really liked the wedge shape of the blank and would try to incorporate that. There are a couple of small irregularly shaped fragments left over that might still become something in my shop or I may give some to a member of my club who puts together fragments of wood for his blanks. Once I had the fillet, I turned it round and then knowing what I would be working with I did some sketches. These were mostly Ogee forms. I showed these to Marcia who looked at them for a moment and then said "Why don't you do a diamond". To which I spluttered " That's a terrible idea" and, after blathering a bit more, "I'll sketch it and show you". Then after eating my hat, I went to the workshop and turned it. Here's some other views: It's definitely a different shape, but I like it.
  18. 11 points
    This was a tough project for me, and a small tribute in my way to Krenov. Rickey's (aka Spanky) curly ambrosia maple is the star of this show and makes me look better than I am. I've said before casework is not my favorite, I've leaned more and more to the sculptured stuff the past few years. But I'd have to say this project was not only a joy to make but a real challenge. Along with the above comments, I really wanted this to be a project journal. I've come to believe when you show your work as you are doing it, you become better from the experience. I also love following project journals and I'm bummed there have been fewer and fewer on here. I didn't want to be part of the problem. And no, I'm not a facebook guy and I'm not moving over to that format, won't do it. Ok, so here goes. I did a wine cabinet a month ago, it turned out well and I had planned to use the basis of that design to make a new liquor cabinet and buffet table. The old ones I have now were made by me 20 years ago and have held up well, but are blocky and unrefined. These will be great to pass on to the kids as they move out. But I wanted to update and get more refined pieces now that my skill level has started to progress. This cabinet has the same flow and leg contours as the wine cabinet had. It's 4' high and about 30" wide. It's made out of walnut I harvested and milled my self and some beautiful curly ambrosia maple that I got from Rickey. Here are a few pictures in production stage. I took these when I thought I could still get this in a project journal. This is a pic of a side of the cabinet, the 2 legs are attached to a panel with dados via loose tenons (aka Dominos). A view of dry asembly, the second pic shows I put 3 cross supports dovetailed intro the side panels. For the drawers I used a center guide rail, I like the simplicity of this and the predictability of this; Pic with the underside of the drawer; The doors were a challenge, and I'm not the best at them. I posted on these in regards to what hinge to use. I settled on a simple solution, but I do wish I attempted a offset knife hinge. My opening wasn't perfectly square. When I put the doors in with just dry assembly, here's what I got; The gap between the doors closes when the top hinges are placed. So I used hide glue for the longer set time and for my ability to manipulate the joint; I put blue tape in the opening to prevent an "issue". Here's a pic with the top hinges in place, presto no gap left; I let these doors sit in place until the hide glue cured. Then I hand planed the hinge side of the door to develop a uniform opening from top to bottom. Since I used a no mortise hinge I needed a slight gap for the hinges. Here's the final assembly, notice the matching figure of the 2 drawers fronts; The back is shiplapped sassafras, love the smell. Did not put a finish on this. Here's a pic of the door tenon/mortise joint, a little tearout on the tenon but still a nice fit; Custom pulls that turned out great; Grain match was ok, but wasn't a knockout; The cabinet in place; Handcut dovetails in the drawers; Fully stocked! Thanks for looking!
  19. 11 points
    Hey everyone! I know I don't post too often, but I figured I'm about halfway through this build and I wanted to share progress and maybe keep myself accountable to finish the darn thing. So a few years ago, when my son was first born, I made a midcentury modern side table. It's shown here: This image has been reduced by 44%. Click to view full size. I am proud of that piece. It was the first time I ever tried to do nothing but best practices in my woodwork. Lots of hand-tooling, lots of hidden and half-blind dovetails, lots of creative crazy joinery. It's holding up quite well, too, and I liked it so much that I decided it needed a friend. Two projects ago, a client wanted a cherry TV stand, so I over-ordered cherry and kept enough back to make myself something. For my next few projects, I want to keep building in this style and filling out my living room. My goal is this: This image has been reduced by 25.3%. Click to view full size. The TV stand, bookshelf, and coffee table are all new, while the other stuff is existing. I know a mission-style white oak Morris chair doesn't exactly go with a bunch of cherry midmod stuff, but I'm keeping it for sentimental reasons. Here's the TV stand that's in progress: This image has been reduced by 25.3%. Click to view full size. This image has been reduced by 31.6%. Click to view full size. On the original side table, I was trying best practices with no regard to how long it took, and that tiny table took about two months as a result. It turned out GREAT, but that's a long time, and I've got commissions to build after this. Gotta make money somehow. So the way I'm looking at this project is that I'm trying to see how quickly and efficiently I can make a piece that I'm proud of without sacrificing too much quality. The project is an exercise in "compromising without compromising," so to speak.Compromises:1. No buying new material. So far so good on this one, I had just the right amount in the shop for the case, doors, and drawer fronts. I did have to use sapwood-heavy boards on the interior, but nobody will ever see that in daily use. I also had to use a board that had a half-inch bug hole through it. It's also on the inside - it'll be the surface that the top drawer rides on top of. I filled the bug damage with epoxy, and nobody will ever be the wiser. Everything on the outside is looking good. I did have to do a few panels with three boards when two wider ones would have been preferable, but I'm working with limited stock here, and I'm keeping it pretty symmetrical, so it's not a major loss. One compromise that I'm somewhat okay with is that the back panel is actually ¼" cherry-veneered MDF panel.2. No overly complicated joinery. On the original side table, the miter joints featured blind mitered dovetails. Those took FOR. EVER. And they look great and were a dream to glue up, because everything came together perfectly, but I'm not sure how much of a payoff there will really be. For this one, I just cut the miters on the table saw with a sled and used biscuits for alignment. On the original, the vertical components were held in place by sliding dovetails in the top and bottom of the case. In the TV stand, they are just held in by a simple tenon in a groove. Simplified joinery, but not to the point it will be weaker.3. Fastening hardware is okay. I'm attaching the base to the top with screws up through the base into the bottom of the cabinet. On the side table I did a crazy sliding dovetail thing - a very cool magic trick for woodworkers to ooh and ahh over, but it actually doesn't really help the piece in use, and it took forever. Screws where they will work better faster and never be seen? I'm in.Non-Compromises:1. The joinery will still be solid. It'll hold up to everyday use. And it will look good doing it.2. The wood will still be as-well-selected as possible in spite of trying to avoid buying new material for this project. It's all pretty decent cherry aside from the defects deep inside the case, which will be invisible during ordinary use.3. The hardware is going to be niiiiice. I bought the stainless steel knife hinges from Lee Valley and installed them in the case prior to glue-up. I just ordered ball catches from Brusso (via Amazon) and will use those to lock the doors shut. I've already got my handle hardware - it's as close as I could find to the hardware from the original side table, and I think it'll look great.So here's my progress so far: This image has been reduced by 44%. Click to view full size. The legs and stretchers went together without a hitch. Simple enough, just vertically-oriented sliding dovetails into the tops of the legs. This is the fourth or fifth time I've used this technique for attaching legs, and it's become one of my favorite techniques. It's just so solid. This photo was prior to final glue-up, but it looks essentially identical right now. This image has been reduced by 44%. Click to view full size. Testing the miters with the biscuits. It went pretty well for the most part. There was a little trouble during the glue-up, but that may be a different post. Definitely easier overall than the blind mitered dovetails, but the glue-up sucked a lot more, haha. This image has been reduced by 44%. Click to view full size. And here's the case put together! This was another pre-glue photo, so what you can't see here (and I'll have to get a picture of later) is the slight bevel on the outer edges of the case. Here's a close-up of it in my sketch up model:That little bit of detailing is really making this piece feel pretty great.So yeah, that's about where it's at at the moment. This image has been reduced by 44%. Click to view full size. (pre-glue, those gaps are all gone now)So, here's where I'm at from here. I've got the door panels glued up and I've got the drawer-fronts selected and rough-cut to size. I am going to take a walk in the danger zone and make my doors be solid wood panels. I figure that the worst that could happen is they get stuck, and I have to trim them - or they warp into potato chips and I have to scrap them and make new doors. Honestly, that wouldn't be so bad. I mean, I'm a woodworker. I've never done solid-wood doors, and this cherry seems quite stable, so I'm giving it a go. I think it'll look good with the modern style. For the interior of the drawers, I'm waffling back and fort between ash and maple - mostly because I have a bit of ash on hand already, but I'm not sure if it will be enough to make what I need, so it may just come down to whether I have enough ash on hand. If I don't, I'll probably buy maple just because it would look better with the cherry.More updates will follow.Keep getting splinters, fellow termites.
  20. 10 points
  21. 10 points
    I recently had a friend request to have a media console made. He moved in to a hip condo downtown that was a remodeled space in some factory or warehouse. I asked him what style he wanted he sent me a picture we decided on dimensions and i started building. I got to pick the wood. Beings that i didn't really care to do oak and stain and light wasn't what he desired cherry was the obvious choice. I didn't take many pictures of the construction because it was very similar to the drawer system i made for my closer but I thought the end result would be appreciated. In the following picture you can see the completed case. I used 1/2" Cherry procore ply. It had a center core of fir surrounded by 2 mdf cores that had the cherry veneer on top. I picked up the ply off craig's list for a mere $35 a sheet. I used some home sawn edge banding to make the front edges. The top corners were mitered. It was my first time doing a long miter like that and i'm quite happy with the result. It was the biggest source of stress for the project. For ease of construction the back was 3 pieces and i glued everything together starting from 1 side to the other. Planning everything was tricky and fun. The holes on the bottom are for fans to cool the central cabinet. He didn't want any shelves. The dimensions of the sides are 20" x 20" x 12.5" deep. The only other thing that my friend insisted on was that the front had to have continuous grain. He originally thought plywood but my first thought jumped to how I would edge plywood and make that look good. My 2nd thought was where i'd get 3/4" ply beings that the one yard that i knew carried it had closed. I found another yard but learned that it would be cheaper to do solid wood. Luckily i knew of some 10.5" wide cherry boards that were just what the doctor ordered. I found some nifty brushed aluminum and to maintain the clean lines mortised them into the door. Here is a shot that shows the side and the top highlighting the most important miter. This is the first thing you'll see walking into the condo from the front door. Because of the lenght i wasn't able to do a waterfall edge :(. He wanted it to be 7' long and 20" tall so ..... that was a missed opertunity. And i was holding what i think is the best for last. The continuous grain front. To make sure that i maintained the continuous grain but also didn't short my self on material i made the center doors as 1 unit and cut the whole thing an inch long. I dind't know how the kerf was going to shake out and didn't want to take risks. Luckily i noticed that there was some strain grain between doors 3 and 4 if you number left to right that would allow me to loose at least an inch if needed with out being noticeable. So i did just that. Other wise the other doors are separated by a kerf width. I don't think the picture does it justice so if it seems life it falls short it may just be the crappy camera phone picture. I'll someday get a better one with the TV in place for scale. I also added in some cable management as well as a permanently mounted power strip that is wired in place. I don't really like making money off my friends but this one made me a good chunk. I priced fair but scored some cheep material.
  22. 10 points
    I am starting a project that I have been thinking about for years and for different reasons have been putting of. My Dad served in WWII in the Navy and my Father in law was a career Navy man and veteran of WWII, Korea And Viet Nam. I have both of there flags and have wanted to build cases for them both but really wanted to do something a different from the normal looking cases. I have spent a lot of time thinking about this and worrying that I would finish them and then come up with a better idea... time wasted sort of. Then this last November my youngest sister lost her husband in a car accident. He also spent four years in the Navy and then almost 40 more working as a government employee with the Navy in weapons development and that is all he could tell us. All three of them were true God and Country men. When my sister asked me to make a case for his flag I figured it was time to get of my duff and do all three at once. I have come up with some design ideas and made a couple of proto types out of poplar to kind of work out the details and to see if what was in my head would actually look good and work. All three will be the same and made out of Sapele. I went to the lumber yard today and got this really nice of 8/4, 10 inches by 12 feet piece. Did my rough layout and then broke it down using my jigsaw. Then over to the band saw to rip it to rough width and then resew it to rough thickness. After that I sticker it all and I am going t let it set for a few days to see if it wants to move in any way. I honestly don't think it will, while I was breaking it down to this point I didn't get the feeling I was releasing and tension. But you never know.
  23. 10 points
    I finally decided to build a miter station. Despite not really having room for one, I realized I can't afford to go without the storage it provides. I have so much stuff that it's just impossible to stay organized and clean. I started this a couple of months ago, after my somewhat traditional winter break from the shop (I still have a project in limbo that I started in November as well!) I really couldn't see a way to get a full 8' to the left, but I rarely need to cut anything like that anyway so I went with 6' to the left and 2' to the right. I am using a lot of what Marc did in his miter station guild project, but didn't really follow his cabinet techniques. I also consider this a primer for making my desk and maybe some kitchen cabinets. I got a lot of mistakes out of the way on this project so hopefully future ones will go smoothly. One problem I ran into is that I bought the plywood 2 weeks apart. So they ended up not being the same size. Also I forgot to trim the cabinet stock to consistent size at the table saw after breaking them down with the track saw. As a result, my first cabinet was 1/8" out of square. The next 3 ended up perfect though. You can see the saw that I bought in February and still haven't even plugged in. It gets moved from spot to spot as I work on this project. Bought out the stock of all Home Depots drawer slides, then Lowes as well. I wanted good slides, but not top of the line. I paid around $20 per set. They aren't self close, but that is ok. Not sure it needs to be My tops are 2 doubled up sheets of plywood with a layer of hardboard so it's nice and smooth. Just a preference really, no real reason for it to be that way. Used brad nails to act as clamps (because I just had to use my new California Air Tools compressor that I got that same day - that thing rocks) Drawer stock, not very exciting. Very few of my drawers were the same size. Part of that is just inexperience in making drawers. One cabinet in particular I wanted difference sizes for different kinds of tools though. This is only about 1/2 the drawers, as I just don't have room to build more than 8 drawers at once. Top together without the trim, drawer boxes installed in a couple of cases.You can see the inconsistency in my spacing there. Some of the drawers I ended up moved when I wasn't satisfied with how they looked. Oh and in the background you can see my foam board that I cut the cabinet plywood on. As I was cutting the last piece, the wind caught the foam board and made it explode into four pieces. Almost like it shattered. I guess that foam was end of life anyway. False front stock. I ended up using true Uncle Cletus wood. I bought a couple of 14" wide, 11' long 8/4 walnut boards from a local guy 3 years ago. The plan was to use them for my desk. Unfortunately they were just too warped for any pieces longer than a few feet, so I used them for this. Here is an example of how bad these boards were. In some cases I couldn't even get 3/4" First false front in Learned a lot of valuable lessons here. I'm not confident in my cabinet squareness or my ability to cut the drawer fronts to perfect width. So I went long on every one of them. Figured I'd just trim them magically to be flush. In fact I bought the Festool RO90 to help with this, but truthfully it didn't prove to be incredibly effective on walnut end grain. As a result I built a shooting board and will try that later. I definitely made some alignment mistakes. This one I held it in place and put brads in it, and it had shifted. So I glued a piece on to the short side that clearly doesn't match. It's shop furniture. If it was for my house I'd have found matching grain or pulled the front off and fixed it. It went smoother after that. I tried to replicate what Marc did by putting the fronts on while the cabinets are laying on their back. When I tipped them back up right, the spacing was off on all of them because there is a little bit of travel in the up and down motion of the slides. So I pulled them all off and did it with the cabinet right side up. However, since they were measured, cut and positioned to the laying down orientation, to get the right gaps between drawers I ended up with the fronts being screwy. In some places they were just a hair lower than the drawer box. Also I forgot that my drawers were all different sizes on the other cabinets and didn't change the template to match. So I ended up using wood filler to fix errant drawer pull holes. This is the one I finished up today, it went great. And it was actually an accident that the bottom two drawers are bookmatched, and the top drawer was cut from the exact same board as the 2nd drawer so it has grain continuity. Obviously the top wasn't big enough so I had to glue up another board. I did a horrible job with grain matching. But again - shop furniture. I still have a bit to do, but I'm really really hoping to get these done on this long weekend.
  24. 10 points
    I've only been able to get a few hours in the shop each week lately, so things have slowed down. Having said that, I've made some significant progress, but unfortunately, it doesn't really show. I've finish sanded and glued up the main cabinet, as well as cut the back panel. I used Old Brown Glue, mainly just to try it, but also for the longer open time. I liked it, but keeping it warm is a bit of a pain. I've also cut all the door joinery and finish prepped the parts (after this photo), but no glue yet. Overall, I'm happy with the way it's progressing. I'm just using 1/2" cherry ply for the panels, but I have some ideas to dress up the cabinet fronts. The plan right now will be to try carving some crests, but realistically that won't happen for a while. This was a lot of dovetails for me, but you definitely get efficient at them:
  25. 10 points
    My son needed somewhere to keep his books. I had almost a full spare sheet of ½" baltic birch plywood. I cranked this thing out from design to finish in about 5 hours today. I had it almost totally finished, and then I decided to give the front face a gentle slope so it would be more bottom-heavy and less likely to tip. The final dimensions are something like 14" deep at the bottom and 10" deep at the top, with a consistent angle across the fronts of the shelves and ends. My son approves. The construction is super simple. The sides got dadoes for the shelves. The back panel is ¼" thick baltic birch and is also dadoes into the back. I used glue and a few pin nails to hold it together. Nothing too crazy. I wanted it very simple, very unobtrusive. The kind of thing that just disappears underneath whatever is on it. It's not fine woodworking - it's woodworking that I look at and think, "yeah, it's fine." I did have a little fun with the selection of boards, as the BBP had some deep mineral streaks that I decided to keep clearly visible by selecting carefully to use them on the shelf tops. The first thing he tried to do was climb on it (of course). I need to anchor it to the wall so he can't tip it, but for the moment he seems to get that it's for books and not for climbing. The second thing he did was put a bucket and a toy boat on his new shelf, because when you're almost 2 and have a bucket and boat, that's just what you do. I think he approves! He was smiling a lot. Altogether a morning well spent!
  26. 10 points
    Alright, got a bit impatient. Photo dump time. I couldn't capture the ray fleck on the tops in the pictures, so that sucks. It's not perfect and never was going to be...but I'm happy, happier than I expected to be. I think I made it the best I could have given my skill, time to dedicate, and material.
  27. 10 points
    So i mentioned it a while back that i had a request for a backgammon board. It sound like fun and would be an interesting change from furniture. Over Christmas @Ronn W gave me a crash course in veneering and helped me figure out the complex issues creating a backgammon board might create. This first one is going to be a test to see how it goes. I fully expect to mess it up somewhere. So i started out by taping the field on top of the light color veneer that i wanted for the light triangles. To keep the triangles the exact same size you cut through both veneers at the same time. This way you don't have to worry about accuracy on cutting. After i cut the three light triangles I taped them in to their places with plenty of painters tape on the backside. This is import because you don't want the bevel on the razor blade to push the veneer around as you are cutting near the delicate points that will be formed. The taping above is after i completed both sides but it shows the overkill taping i did to make sure nothing moves. The next step was to rinse and repeat with the dark triangles. I'm going to make the board in 2 parts, getting veneer wide enough to do both on one sheet proved to be difficult. It also isn't necessary as there is generally a divider separating both pieces so i can take advantage of that to do separate veneers here. Typically the boards are made with a hinge in the middle but i wanted to go for something a little different. Still working it out so I'll explain later. Now i'm at the point where i need to add the veneer tape and then prep everything to be glued down. I'm not quite sure how that's going to work so off to do research.
  28. 10 points
    Thanks to government inefficiency, I was off all weekend. The major lifting is done. It needs a lot of cleanup, flattening, etc, but at least it now looks like a bench. I ended up at about 82" long and 24 1/2 inches wide. The gap stop is about 2 1/4". Back to work tomorrow, but after flattening, I'll be on to shaping the chop, making the shelf, making the gap stop and figuring out what I'm going to use for the deadman. All relatively quick, tasks.
  29. 10 points
    I built this shelf out of off the rack red oak a few years ago. I saw all this curl in the back of the pile and bought the whole board. Used Marc’s recipe for popping the grain. I think it turned out well. I have no beef with red oak.
  30. 10 points
    A friend builds some very nice custom knives and we've been talking about a collaboration on Etsy, for him to build the knife and me to build a box. He didn't have a knife ready but I built a box anyway. And I built a knife... The box is Walnut with Figured Walnut accents and Red Palm handles, finished in Nitrocellulose lacquer. The knife is Curly Maple, Red Palm, and Figured Walnut, finished is French polish Shellac. Enjoy! David
  31. 10 points
    I have the drawers finished and knobs installed. My plan was to work on the top this week but that isn't working out. So here are some topless pictures.
  32. 9 points
    I received for my Birthday, from my to younger grandkids a gift card to my lumber yard. They told their mom they wanted to give "Paga" some wood to build something with. My daughter told them that I should pick the wood out myself but that they could get me a gift card from the lumber yard. When they went in they were told that they didn't have gift cards but the guy at the counter went over and cut them a piece of pine and told them to give that to me and tell me what it was for.
  33. 9 points
    I was planning to next post with the completed Harlequin Side table, however it has been two steps forward and one back. Selecting the drawer fronts .. well, I've cut and recut them a few times, and only now satisfied with the result. It is no small deal each time since a drawer front has to be fitted into a recess that is shaped like a parallelogram. And if the fit is not good enough ... well, a few would-be drawer fronts were discarded. What parts are needed? Well, the drawer sides are 1/4" thick - too thin for grooves, so there will be slips to support the drawer bottom. The drawer sides are Tasmanian Oak, which I use frequently, as it is a light wood that allows the drawer fronts to be shown to their best, and it is available quarter sawn. The drawer back will also be Tassie Oak. The drawer bottoms are solid wood and 1/4" thick. Rather than use Tasmanian Oak, I thought I would add a little life with Tasmanian Blue Gum. It is quite similar is texture and tone (although the photos here do not show this), but has more figure. Enough here for 8 drawers ... Drawer sides and drawer fronts ... Great sander ... Mirka Ceros ... These will be the drawer bottoms. The board in the centre is the Hard Maple case back ... Do you think anyone will notice that the drawer bottoms run sequentially? The making of the drawer slips may have some interest. I used Tasmanian Blue Gum (because it links to the drawer bottoms). This is quite interlocked and any planing with a plough to form either grooves or beads would be expected to end unhappily, with much tearout. I have posted this tip before: add a 15 degree backbevel to all plough blades to create a high 60 degree cutting angle. The 3/16" beads were ploughed with the Veritas Combination Plane ... Brilliant finish ... ... and a 1/8" groove for the rebate in the drawer bottom was ploughed by the Veritas Small Plow ... Again, tearout free ... This is a mock up of the intersection of the drawer front (back), drawer side into drawer slip and against a drawer side ... Note that the drawer front is straight/flat at this stage but, once dovetailed, they will be shaped to curve along the bow front of the case. These are the timbers I have chosen for the drawer fronts. This is what gives the side table the harlequin name. Three timbers: Black Walnut, a pink Jarrah, and figured Hard Maple. Keep in mind that there is no finish at this stage ... Next time hopefully with everything completed. Regards from Perth Derek
  34. 9 points
    I restored this Stanley 112 Scraper from what was called a "basket case" It was just hidden under surface rust and crud. I love these scrapers, as well tuned they are great at giving an alternative to sandpaper on figured wood. If anyone is interested in seeing the others, I'll post them too. I've been doing this for 25 years and as I just got back into woodworking after a long break; I have been getting planes and so forth to restore.
  35. 9 points
    The Harlequin side table will have 8 drawers. The drawer case sides and the central drawer blade are panels and run in dados or housings (depending on which side of the pond you live). Positioning of these dados is critical since any misalignment will affect the aesthetic. It goes without saying (but I shall) that the alignment also determines that the side panels will be square ... and drawers need to run against square sides. All this is done here with hand tools. Some of the finer points in getting it precise ... First of all, templates (or story sticks) are created to position the dados. There are two for each side panel: the second is 10mm longer than the first. Scoring each creates an exact 10mm dado. There is a series of templates to position all the dados. This ensures that the upper and the lower dado are position exactly the same distance from the reference wall ... A chisel wall is created for the marked outlines. This wall enables the fence to be lined up using a wide chisel ... The sidewalls are sawn with a azebiki saw. This have two curved sides, one with coarse rip teeth and the other with fine crosscut teeth. I begin with the fine teeth and use them to establish the kerf, and then switch to to the coarse teeth for speedier sawing. With a compass, I check that the kerf is parallel and to the desired width (10mm) ... The sawn side wall is now chopped away close to full depth ... This is done across the dados on one board at a time ... The waste in the centre of each dado is removed with a router plane. The dados are done at the same time to save have to reset the depth of cut (one stroke on dado #1, one on dado #2, and one on dado #3 ... then back to #1 ...) ... Keep an eye on the depth ... Fine tune the dado should theoretically be unnecessary if they were marked accurately. In practice, I find that there is usually some waste in the corners, or a slightly sloped wall. For this reason I run a side rebate plane (here a Veritas), the length of each wall. This is not held vertically, since that with remove some of the width. Instead it is run at an angle away from the side wall, as it it was undercutting the side wall ... The fit is now checked with an offcut from the side panel ... The side rebate plane can take a smidgeon off the sidewall if the fit is too tight. Some will argue that it is preferable to plane the panel instead. In this situation that is not advisable since the panel is to slide along the dado, and a tight point will impede all points of the panel. The carcase is Hard Maple, with Merbau as the secondary wood. Locally, Merbau is used for decking. It is cheap and hard, both qualities valued. But is a really brittle wood, and awful to work with. The number of splinters I have had ... and they are sharp and lodge deeply. Ugh! It can look like this ... ... and then a section breaks away ... At least it will be far inside the carcase and not be seen. A panel is made up for the interior dividers ... The pieces are fitted. Will the careful planning and neurotic execution pay off? I was holding my breath. This is a dry fit .... (sound of breathing again) Then I pulled it apart and glued up the carcase ... More after the coming weekend. Regards from Perth Derek
  36. 9 points
    The move is done. Here it is in its new happy home. Now I'm just waiting on my electrician. That'll probably be next week. The movers basically just carried the thing up the stairs one step at a time. And the blurred photos are not to hide their identities, these guys were really fast and efficient. Now to put it together and do some shop re-arranging.
  37. 9 points
    I finally finished our bed for the wife and I. It is king size and constructed of some very old heart pine that I salvaged from some dairy barn beams. I resawed the beams to get the wood sizes required and then ran everything through my planer etc. The wood is extremely hard as much as oak and machined beautifully with the great pine smell permeating my shop. I managed to hide most of the old nail and peg holes and then finished the wood with 3 coats shellac followed by hand waxing and buffing. That took a long time as there is a lot of surface area to cover. LOL This is my largest furniture project to date and I learned as I went along. I did not take any shortcuts and everything is put together with hand cut mortise and tenon joinery. I used splines to join the panel boards. I used Titebond PVA and the bed rails are fastened using old fashioned bed bolts through the ends of the tenons and posts. I did make some mistakes of course, but nothing major. I just took my time and slogged at it for about 4 weeks.
  38. 9 points
    So today i made a big push on getting the backrest designed and finished. I had no idea what i was going to do with this when i woke up. I nailed down the design and plunged a lot of mortises for dominoes and got everything together for both back rests. It's starting to look like a chair. I need to get some shorter SS screws to attach the back rest to the chair. To tie the seat in I'll be plugging the screw holes with Ipe. I like how the back of the back rest turned out. Everything steps in. The one down side is the back rest is heavy so the chair sits at a fair natural tilt. In the pictures i used a block as a kickstand. The good part about the extra weight is that when sitting in the chair it sits better in the reclined position. I need to route a more comfortable chamfer or something for where your head touches the headrest and then finish sand everything. So it's close to being done. It might i still have quite a few to make so I'll give it a shot. I've been working on the back rest today cause i wanted to see how everything was going to turn out.
  39. 9 points
    Things went excellent. Came out dead flat and sanded up nicely. Removing the veneer tape was fun but also nerve racking i didn't want to sand through the veneer. I don't know what this link will do but the origional image is 10 meg and has a bit more resoulition. If you go to the full size version you can maybe see some of the gaps but i'm really happy with how hard they are to find. Thank you @Ronn W i hope i did well. Now to glue the other one down and then make the box to go around all of this.
  40. 9 points
    I want to show you what I got from Houston today. Talk about a box maker check this out.
  41. 9 points
    I'm building The Wood Whisperer's Outdoor sitting Bench. I'm making it several inches shorter in length for the space I have at my front entry, and I'm doing it in Walnut. Lots of Ms&Ts
  42. 9 points
    I did up the lower section of the bench yesterday. Eight more M&Ts went pretty quickly. I tapered the back sides of the legs with a quick and dirty tapering fixture. I pillowed one of the legs and cleaned it up with hand planes to remove the saw marks. I saved the other three legs for later but still had to dry assemble the bench to see what it looks like.
  43. 9 points
    In the 18 months since my last update I've made a couple of hundred corrections / updates / additions www.hobbithouseinc.com/wood_name_database/
  44. 9 points
    Slow going with whole kitchen remodel but got the walnut top finished. Thanks for all the advice and tips. After trying various stains and dyes on some scrap and on the bottom side of this slab it was decided to use NO stain and just polyurethane. I used Arm-R-Seal gloss to build up a few coats (used cotton cut up t-shirts) and finished it off with same brand polyurethane but in satin. I did not use plywood underneath. I attached top to cabinets using perpendicular to grain slotted boards and table fasteners (sort of an L shape) so that slab can move with changes to temp/humidity. The double edge pulls of the thick slab look nicely. Thanks again.
  45. 9 points
    There is always a corner of the shop which becomes a bit of a dumping ground and where things pile up. This is the area where my sharpening stuff begins, and then deteriorates as it merges with a "cabinet" that holds supplies and a wall of screws and stuff. An old stereo hanging on the wall - a dust trap. I really hates this area. What follows is not fine furniture building! A friend gave me a bunch of veneered MDF boards ... This is what emerged after the past weekend ... Space for an old amplifier. And more storage ... That looks better ... Regards from Perth Derek
  46. 9 points
    Well ... I thought I ought to post an update on this thread ... It's not all good news ... on the move back to Canada this piece didn't fare too well for a number of reasons. First ... at some point in the move the package containing this got dropped, and three of the legs broke off, and the rest of the carcass got badly damaged. Second ... the move from a humid tropical environment with no seasons, to the bone-dry climate of Alberta (also the wood was probably just air dried) caused some serious shrinkage ... I knew there would be some, but it was seriously more than I anticipated ... my poor pegged tenons didn't manage to move enough, and so it started pulling itself apart ... revealing all kinds of design flaws. Thirdly ... the wood movement was not even, and any sapwood cupped violently (although the heartwood wasn't too bad). Fortunately there wasn't much sapwood in the project, but I had prepared a whole bunch as secondary wood to be used in the drawer construction ... seriously just firewood now. Fourthly ... the top I had fortunately built out of quartersawn boards, so it remained relatively stable, and ended up surprisingly flat ... However the shrinkage was so significant, that it just wasn't big enough any more ... so I had to rip it in half and splice in about a 3/4" strip. With all the other changes in my life ... even once I got it back into my garage ... I just kept looking at it and thinking "firewood" ... I had a real motivation problem to get enthusiastic about repairing all the damage, and getting back to finishing it all off. Well, eventually I thought I had to do something with it ... either have at it again, or chop it up and burn it ... one way or the other it had to get off my bench and stop cluttering up the garage. So I glued the legs back on, and started to think about what had to be done next. Because of my motivational issues, and all the damage (most of which I just covered up, rather than fixing properly), I was just trying to get it done not necessarily done well. So I'm afraid I wasn't documenting the rest of the build ... but slowly it began to get back into a condition that I thought could be saved ... The wood is a South American wood called "Sapan". It's quite a common wood for domestic use in Colombia, it's hard and dense, with straight grain, and very pretty when finished ... but it is a brute to work with ... it's hard on tools, it has interlocking grain making it awful to plane without tearout, and it's horribly splintery. What's more I seem to be allergic to the splinters. I covered the drawer fronts with a bubinga veneer that I had. There's two small hidden drawers inside, into one of which a printout of this thread is going. Although it is certainly not my finest work (no close up pics since I'm trying to hide damage and poor fitting joinery from excessive wood movement etc.). I knew I was pushing my limits with this one from the start, and the whole process was certainly a learning experience and has made me a better woodworker. So here it is ...
  47. 9 points
    Under the mattress is a 3/4 ply base supported with ripped 2x4s, screwed and glued for a simple frame. Didn't have to be pretty (and it isn't!), just solid. And it's heavy. So here it is in the bedroom, just last night. This started September 2017 which is a little embarrassing to say but at least the results are in and we slept off the floor!
  48. 8 points
  49. 8 points
    So this is where I'm at now. Main case dry fitted. Drawers are from an old project (my daughter rejected them ). Next up is finish prep, glue-up and fitting the back. The large cubbies on the sides are for books.
  50. 8 points
    I got a good chunk of the interior done. I'm using some drawers from an old project, so I'm trying to fit the case to the drawers, rather than the other way around, so the fit likely won't be perfect, but I'm ok with that. I've discovered that the router and I simply don't get along. It shouldn't be hard, but I really struggled with the dados for the interior dividers. A project like this is a good one to practice on though as any mistakes can be easily hidden, and it will never leave the shop.