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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/19/19 in all areas

  1. I just finished Christian Becksvoort’s plan for a shaker step stool from Jan 2018 FWW . The last step is three screws with plugged holes. Didn’t sound common for a shaker piece? I bought a plug cutter set and did some test boards with very carefully matching face grain...not a fan. Reminds me of cheap entertainment centers. Thinking an end grain plug will look better...while it’ll be more conspicuous, it’ll at least match the end grain on the dovetails. Plus, it’ll look like a joinery peg instead of a weird post-mistake glue in fix. Generally speaking...face grain plugs...when are they useful without looking like weird circles? Here are some pics:
    6 points
  2. Happy with how this turned out and glad I strayed from the face-grain plugs. Sad this will turn banana yellow once the varnish hits it...never liked the waterborne stuff. The dents, dings, and scratches always seem to stick out as super-white
    4 points
  3. I also retired when I was 52 and I am now 66. I have told people many times since I retired that there are many, many days where I wonder how I had time for a 40 hour job and it always puzzles me how people in retirement can say they are bored.
    4 points
  4. Nope; you are obviously too young for that. I'm told that there is no shortcut to mourning. Truly sorry.
    3 points
  5. 3 points
  6. Sold one of my lenses to my friend. Figured I'd use some of this sustainable renewable packing material i had laying around.
    3 points
  7. Face grain plugs never stop looking like weird circles, unless you paint over them. IMO.
    3 points
  8. Dt’s look great. The screws and plugs are not in the yet, right? How about using square plugs with rounded proud edges.
    3 points
  9. Finally got around to finishing the shutters. Looking forward to installing them soon.
    3 points
  10. Turned some end grain plugs. Cut and installed tonight. I'll post some pics in the am when the glue dries. Much happier with the look than face grain. I never want to work with figured birch again...my planes were all useless.
    2 points
  11. I always go end grain just to make sure it looks like the plugs were intentional. Trying to hide them never works and looks like a patched mistake.
    2 points
  12. To bad you couldn't cover it with contact paper. I honestly don't no how you could get it to look good.
    2 points
  13. While I really like the Greene and Greene look, and have now made several pieces in that style, I'm now quite intrigued by the Federal style of fourniture, with its stringing and inlays. While I think inlays are somewhat beyond my dexterity level, I think stringing and Fluting are right in my wheel well, so to speak. To that end, I started researching tools panda methods to accomplish this. Steve Latta is the renowned expert in the world of these things, and there are many others. Latta has gone in with Lie-Nielson and has a beautiful set of tools available for the better part of $400. As a beginner, hobbyist, where there's no money to be made I hesitate to spend that much on a lark. However, Lee Valley sells Fluting blades and you can get eight or so for $30, and LN sells stringing sizing blades, a set of two for $15 (possibly the cheapest thing on their site). So I bought a set of each from each vendor, and proceeded to make my own holders. Garrett Hack has some videos and articles in FWW about stringing, so I made one of his tools, and another article by an ther out for has a different holder, so I made some of those as well. Anyone who has experience in this area I'd be glad to know a few things. I see holly used as stringing, but I have easy access to maple so plan to use that. Any problems there? Pitfalls? I've searched this site but found not much about the actual making and use of stringing. So here's my spot where I'll out a few things.
    1 point
  14. bleedinblue If I were you I would get through your bench build before you adjust the rollers I think you will find with shorter stock less than 5' you will have less issues. I will also look for an article I have on making a shop made outfeed table that utilizes an adj paint roller handle as the support. MN Steve with the short planer table (like 28" I think) the weight of the long boards on the in-feed but more so on the out-feed cause issues with the feed rollers.
    1 point
  15. I have found on mine that if I send long boards through I have to make sure they stay level, which is tough given the short length of the table. I have thought about either making or buying the extensions but just haven't done enough work with long stock to get to it yet. If you have a roller stand set it up on the out feed side and try to make it mirror the table from a height perspective, its worked fro me.
    1 point
  16. Oh man, for sure! That think is so ridiculously overpriced for what it is! I have a lot of Festool tools, but that one, every time I have gotten my hands on one I just cant believe how surprised I am over how silly it feels. Thankfully I am not a mobile worker and only work in my home shop, so I dont need the portability I guess it offers. That said, I do use my 26" Woodpeckers Square all the time to square up guide rails for track saw cuts. Not THATS a tool I recommend to everyone that has a track saw!
    1 point
  17. I would guess that it is a problem with the feed rollers, I'm sure there is a way to adjust.
    1 point
  18. I find myself agreeing on end grain vs face grain plugs. Unless the color & grain are such that the plugs can be made almost invisible, it's better to have them contrast.
    1 point
  19. I think I remember hearing once that it was called a 'Boot' or "Shoe". I'm probably wrong, but that's what my old mind remembers.
    1 point
  20. Eh, my desk is in worse shape. The key is to keep it covered in crap. A little sharpie action will hide the worst of it.
    1 point
  21. You know it's coming Ross... wait for it............................................................Ya done good young'un.
    1 point
  22. I always like face grain plugs but, usually select a contracting species. I agree with the above that they're difficult at best to hide..
    1 point
  23. Don’t give him your address. He’ll be a fantastic teacher the first 70 years but what are you going to do when he keeps on teaching and you’re too darn old to listen.
    1 point
  24. The 735 is a fine machine and I hope you get the problem resolved. When you do, get back with us with the resolve. And welcome to the forum. Would like to see your work. Good luck bud!
    1 point
  25. I think that particle board desk is a bit too far gone for spray paint to be of much help.
    1 point
  26. Nice project. They never disappear, but probably absolutely no one but you will ever notice them. I like the end grain idea, but frankly the face grain plugs never bothered me.
    1 point
  27. Applying a coat of shallac and sanding again should fix the problem. I had this issue with red ironwood. My random orbital sander was actually ripping the splinters out!
    1 point
  28. Damn spell check never hear of a planer before!!! I guess I should have said thicknesser. Anyway, I’m not sure how to read a multimeter. Mine reads from left to right. So when the needle moves, that means that there is a short or a bad part? Since I don’t know how to use a multimeter, tomorrow I will try to bypass the circuit breaker and check the brushes. I don’t know what would cause a short, the wires all look in good shape. The planer is about 8 yrs old with very limited use because I worked a lot of hours at my job. Now I’m retired and want to use my tools, and now I have problems.
    1 point
  29. Everyone else does . Those drawers are super handy. Blade & other wrenches, tilt box, a flashlight, pencils, miter-gauge add-ons, stop blocks, iBox, ZCI's, lions and tigers and bears - oh my! I don't think I do anything very clever inside those drawers. Let me go see if there is anything picture worthy . . . Meh! Pretty low-tech. Except for a few dividers, most of the stuff is large enough to just set there. Your dividers have got me thinking about my assembly table drawers though. They deserve some attention on the inside.
    1 point
  30. I'm not the grammar police, but my planet is still turning.
    1 point
  31. You are a lucky man, and I completely agree. I wish I'd retired earlier. I'm living the dream now, working at part time jobs I enjoy, and enjoying time with kids and grandkids.
    1 point
  32. Retired at 52, 66 now. My daughter asked me if I ever get bored, my answer was I have never been bored a day in my whole life. Hunt, hike, fish, travel, woodwork, too much to list. Even with all the money in the world what I would want is TIME, more time to enjoy my family, friends and all the things I love to do.
    1 point
  33. This retirement subject reminds me of a question I love asking people. It's a difficult question, for most it takes a long time to answer if they can even answer it at all. I usually ask the question like this: So we have all thought about what we would do if we won the lottery or a rich relative dies and you now have more money than you know what to do with. The question is NOT what would you do once you had your hands on that money, that pretty much gets answered the same way by everyone. (Car we always wanted. House on the beach/mountain/lake. Take care of our parents/siblings/kids. Travel, travel, travel.) The question is, what are you doing with yourself 10 years later? When you have more cars than you can drive. Fancy houses no longer excite you. Your family is taken care of, you want to spend time with them (and you have) but they have a life to live and you don't want to wear out your welcome. The thought of another long flight makes you cringe and remembering the last time you went through customs gets raises your blood pressure. You have 16 hours a day to kill, every day, for years and years. What would you be doing with yourself?
    1 point
  34. Here are all five holders with various blades. I even made drawer space for them next to my G&G square punches. I hope they get along OK; the drawer is officially a bit crowded. The black marks are where I had to grind the wood screws down since I only had 1" screws and the wood is 4/4 *shrug*
    1 point
  35. Let's see. Yesterday I finished up a Roorkhee chair I started in my turning class last semester. Kudos to Jason Thigpen at Texas Heritage Woodworks @txheritage for the outstanding leather package! Today I went down to Albuquerque to the ABQ Woodworkers Association to invite them to a Darrell Peart seminar and workshop we're hosting at Santa Fe Community College in April. Then I stacked more firewood most of the afternoon. And now I'm having a "glass" of wine.
    1 point
  36. Birchwood-Casey Tru-Oil which is a "modified" linseed oil. Used it many times! Worth it and waterproof.
    1 point
  37. 76 now and retired 11 years ago. There was always something to do , always. Then my wife died. Now I have almost no interests. I'm thinking, it's the start of a downhill slide. Oh well, I've lived my life.
    0 points
  38. I finished my router table this morning, and after a bad fall on the ice yesterday dropping a 60 foot pine for my dad, I took it easy today and updated the build logs on my website. https://www.farback.ca/index.php/workshop-projects/24-gurkha-kukri-display-stand https://www.farback.ca/index.php/workshop-projects/25-crosscut-and-outfeed-tables-for-vintage-table-saw https://www.farback.ca/index.php/workshop-projects/26-router-table https://www.farback.ca/index.php/boat-shop/27-bear-mountain-redbird-canoe-2019
    0 points