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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/09/19 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    This is a bowl that my wife, Marcia, made. It's made form two pieces of Khaya (African mahogany) sandwiching a thin piece of zebra wood. The rim and stem are accented with Inca Gold Gilder's Paste. The design and work are her own. I consulted on the project, but surprisingly little. Don't know about you all, but I was impressed.
  2. 4 points
    My chaos week at work ended and i made it home early yesterday and was able to wrap up 1 chair. I got the back mounted with some screws and plugged the holes. The Ipe was a good choice it blends in to the white oak very well but also hides the glue line around the outside some. Not all the plugs are perfect but i had a difficult time with stuff chipping. The chipping occurred in the middle of the plugs more often than the top or the bottom so there wasn't much of a solution other than a very slow feed rate. I probably should have dropped the rpm of my drill press some but i didn't think about that until after it was all done and it was already at 300 rpm. Pictures first finish decision to follow. Total chair with finish. Color is nicer than i expected. I thought it was going to be a lot more yellow. Shows side plugs and seat plugs. With finish they blend in nicely and add a touch of complimentary color without being high contrast. For the finish i decided on the Outdoor Defense Tung Oil from The real Milk Paint Company. The main reason is easy of purchase and is readily available. Secondary but near equal reason is they clearly label the ingredients in their product and didn't have the smoke and mirrors confusion that all the box store brands employ to get people to buy their product. What i was looking for in a finish was something that didn't form a think film and was easily touched up by just wiping on another coat or treating scratches. This stuff will accomplish that. Beings that the chairs will get wet and won't see much sunlight i wanted something that was going to control mold and mildew and this product clearly includes zinc which is an additive that will accomplish that. Clear simple strait forward .... i love it. Shots fired at osmo, it could be the greatest product in the world but the distribution network in the US is crap. Dealers are hard to find and the ones that carry all the products seem very sketchy. The dealers that are reputable don't carry the full line of products.
  3. 3 points
    I just made a $600 cutting board
  4. 2 points
  5. 2 points
    Excellent! She should just take over your account now.
  6. 1 point
    Marcia wants me to tell all of you "thanks". It's pretty cool having something like this that we both do. She's definitely not as in to it as I am, but enough that she understands what I'm doing and sometimes I even get a helpful suggestion. Doesn't hurt that it's a shared interest when I want to buy something, either.
  7. 1 point
    That's awesome she's done well.
  8. 1 point
    Simple but yet very classy. Well done!
  9. 1 point
    Your not even close to the only one. It's a rare person that hasn't been confused the first time they try to do something like this. It's all part of the learning process.
  10. 1 point
    First time cutting buckshot walnut, but I have cut birdshot walnut before.
  11. 1 point
    Very nice execution and combination of woods. Nice looking piece overall.
  12. 1 point
    I like it. It must be challenging to make sure everything is spaced properly. I feel like there should be a gap between the doors. Though in understand that isn't really feasible.
  13. 1 point
    The DC system is due to be upgraded next. It consists of a 2hp unit with a Super Dust Deputy and 5" hosing ... This has to feed from a combination jointer/planer (Hammer A3-31), Bandsaw (Hammer N4400) and sliding tablesaw (Hammer K3). It is simply not powerful enough (needs at least 3 hp) and larger pipes (6" has double the flow of 5", which has double the flow of 4"). By the time it gets to the table saw, there is not enough oomph to suck the dust at the blade guard. I now use a Festool CT26E at the dust guard, and this works very well ... Regards from Perth Derek
  14. 1 point
    Can you fun-lattened it to prevent water from staying on it ? I have used australian timber oil finish (the version with the plain cover, not the blue cover, which is not as good) on outdoor project (mostly teak or lyptus). You need to redo it 1 or 2 a season, but it is a lot easier than a film finish, which must be totally removed. All you do, is hose up the old finish to clean the surface, wait for it to dry, then re-apply the oil finish with a rag. It is not shiny like a film finish, but a lot easier to refinish (and a lot less costly than penofin). Martin
  15. 1 point
    So today i made a big push on getting the backrest designed and finished. I had no idea what i was going to do with this when i woke up. I nailed down the design and plunged a lot of mortises for dominoes and got everything together for both back rests. It's starting to look like a chair. I need to get some shorter SS screws to attach the back rest to the chair. To tie the seat in I'll be plugging the screw holes with Ipe. I like how the back of the back rest turned out. Everything steps in. The one down side is the back rest is heavy so the chair sits at a fair natural tilt. In the pictures i used a block as a kickstand. The good part about the extra weight is that when sitting in the chair it sits better in the reclined position. I need to route a more comfortable chamfer or something for where your head touches the headrest and then finish sand everything. So it's close to being done. It might i still have quite a few to make so I'll give it a shot. I've been working on the back rest today cause i wanted to see how everything was going to turn out.
  16. 1 point
    The Ipe top plug is only a bit darker. This picture makes it look a bit more than it really is. I like it because instead of trying to hid the plug it calls it out but not in a hugely contrasted way.