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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/26/19 in all areas

  1. Fairly simple monitor riser I made for my desk at work. I used a lot of suggestions from you guys on this project. All in all this simple thing took an incredible amount of time. Not only because life has been extremely busy which makes getting shop time hard but because I am apparently just a slow woodworker. I would love to just chalk my slowness up me always trying new techniques and joinery for the first time but if I am honest with myself I just don't have a very fast pace. But I suppose the slow pace is a good percent of the enjoyment for me. I have a stressful job and two young kid
    10 points
  2. I just finished restoring this Stanley 25 low angle transitional plane. It was in very bad shape with lots of pitting; I had to get another blade as the one that came with it was unusable. I was pleasantly surprised that it took such a nice shaving beings this type of plane has no chip breaker.
    6 points
  3. Thanks much. One of the trickier details was fitting the doors to the cloud lift arch. trying to get the consistent reveal all the way around took some thought. Here's how I wound up doing it. I first matched the upper door rail to the bottom of the cloud lift and clamped it in place with the spacers I use for the offset. Then I added the right stile, again with the offset, then the bottom (no offset spacer which gave me room to trim), just working my way around. That method worked out really well. Once all four pieces were in place I scribed the panel to fit and added
    4 points
  4. Still no video put together but here are a few shots of the current status. The ebony "pegs" on the lower doors (actually drawer fronts) are just electrical tape I used to play with different arrangements for the real ones. If anyone follows Darell Peart on IG you may have seen his posts about updating his finishing process since he did the Fremont Night Stand guild project. He's trying to get away from ARS and VOC's in general to a safer and less toxic process. He posted that he was going to Livos Kunos oils, specifically cocobolo for the color and natural as a topcoat.
    4 points
  5. Started by taking decking boards up at low spots. Dropped 4x6 into water where we wanted it bolted to the dock structure. Set up 3' high section of scaffolding around it, with 2' walkway on both sides of post. Drilled 1-3/4" hole near top for short chain to hold top of 2 ton chain hoist. Another 3/8" chain around the joist next to the post. Using chain hoist, pull piling down, which also raises the sagging dock up-putting a lot of weight on the post. That will pull it down 2 or 3 feet without touching the piling. When it stops sinking the post, I get on top of the scaffolding, a
    3 points
  6. Well done, I have one suggestion. The surface of your desk is slick, where the monitor sit on flat cut oak. It'll move if touched, or bumped. Try some 1/8" cork on the feet of your riser. It should help stabilize it.
    2 points
  7. Yes, that is correct. I’ll post another photo after I attach the fronts. I’ve been picking cherries all morning.
    2 points
  8. I would have purchased mine from Rockler except for the fact that I couldn't get the different colors. I am happy I have the different colors. You shouldn't have t resort to this when the manufacturer offers multiple colors to begin with Rockler and maybe other places just need to make simple adjustments to the shopping cart service to take better care of the customers I make the grits on mine but it is the color that makes it an easy grab for the grit you want.
    2 points
  9. I recently had a friend request to have a media console made. He moved in to a hip condo downtown that was a remodeled space in some factory or warehouse. I asked him what style he wanted he sent me a picture we decided on dimensions and i started building. I got to pick the wood. Beings that i didn't really care to do oak and stain and light wasn't what he desired cherry was the obvious choice. I didn't take many pictures of the construction because it was very similar to the drawer system i made for my closer but I thought the end result would be appreciated. In the following picture yo
    2 points
  10. It’s unfortunate Rockler won’t let you select the color choice online and doesn’t offer a full set. Different colors for different grits sounds handy.
    2 points
  11. I'm super impressed Drew. That thing is gorgeous! How long would you say this took you? I ask because your build speed is baffling to me. I may be the slowest woodworker ever.
    2 points
  12. Lakeville, southwest metro
    2 points
  13. Last year I was redoing the siding on the back of my house. Doing a relatively high level energy efficiency job. Replacing all of the fiberglass insulation with ROXUL, using polywall liquid applied flashing to seal the mudsill to the slab (and waterproof the mudsill with isn't treated) then a layer of zip r-sheathing. That's when the trouble started. as we were adding sheets of the sheathing, we noticed the slab was slopping. All told, we found the slab was out of level by Over 1 1/2" over 32 feet. This required that every sheet of Zip had to be individually cut on a angle (thank god for
    2 points
  14. Working through some dried blanks. This bowl is 10 5/8" diameter, 5 1/2" height and will be gifted to a birthday girl next month. Basic, twelve-segment rim of cherry upon a body of honey locust. This is all I was able to salvage from a tree taken down in the church's memorial garden back in 2017. I blocked off a whole afternoon with a pile of downed logs, thinking that I'd score some bowl blanks and maybe even a few long cuttings for lumber. Silly me. Honey locust is a bit off the beaten path as lumber goes and it's a trick to work. Apart from the blazing yellow color in the sa
    1 point
  15. Complimenting you on the design.
    1 point
  16. Hey Gents! New to WoodTalk and woodworking, looking forward to being inspired by the wonderful content here and have access to the wealth of knowledge. Wanted to say hello and let y'all know what I'm working on this week. This is a dining room table project I have been chipping away at for a few weeks now, made from oak that was given to me years ago. I have carted this lumber around through three moves and finally felt confident enough to use it on a project. For my first go at a breadboard, well any mortise and tenon work for that matter, I am very pleased with the outcome. Hope t
    1 point
  17. Not sure if you are saying that as a pro or a con. Three reasons for this though. 1. I need a second monitor so wanted the platform to be big enough to handle that. 2. What you don't see in any of these pictures is how incredibly messy my desk usually is. I wanted this thing to be big enough so I can slide papers, keyboard, mouse and other stuff under it to hide the mess when I need to. 3. I don't like doing things they way they are "normally" done. I'm a contrarian by nature. I don't even do it on purpose. I'm just naturally difficult. (Read: PITA)
    1 point
  18. Little different design then you normally see I was expecting something just under the monitor.
    1 point
  19. Rockler is running a special on these for the 4th. Preppin Weapon
    1 point
  20. Most of you just don’t do it enough. When your full time job is dealing with all the lumps and bumps, you plan for it. Planning for it means less surprise and greater efficiency. Even in new construction, “nothing” is plumb...”nothing” is square. The eaves are full of bird poop.
    1 point
  21. Joshua, seeing that you are from Santa Fe, TX, my thoughts and prayers have been with you and your community. I hope your family and friends are safe and sound.
    1 point
  22. I learned a long time ago, that to split those gnarly woods. You have to wait until the temp is below freezing for a week or more. Then it splits like oak.
    1 point
  23. Nice job giving that piece a new life, and that shaving shows it still has lots of woodworking to do
    1 point
  24. Hi Elizabeth, Welcome to the forums. I have the Kreg router table, with casters for mobility. I haven't added a lift yet. If I had known when I was looking at router tables that I would be buying a Sawstop cabinet saw, I would have foregone the table and bought the router wing for the Sawstop. I may do that anyway at some point - one can never have too many routers, or tables.....or something like that.
    1 point
  25. Made for a catchy title. :-)
    1 point
  26. yes sir they are, i think it is called a haunched tenon. The fit up was nice but the tennons look like a beaver with a chipped tooth got after them
    1 point
  27. I think for a router table it really depends on your budget, your space, and what you want to do with it. @Mark J has suggested an excellent setup if you want to go with a higher end (and is probably what I would do if space and budget weren't a concern). For me personally, I have the fixed base from my Porter Cable 1 3/4 HP variable speed router attached to a Kreg plate in the wing of my table saw. It gets the job done, and having it on the table saw saves space and helps with stability (as compared to a small bench top router table). Even a cheap and simple router table, which can be as crud
    1 point
  28. I found the die grinder very helpful on my sculpted bar stools. For me the third one was the charm. I started with a Makita battery operated but it was to big and not enough power. then I went to a electric one (can't remember the brand) again to big. I ended up with an IR air powered one that worked awesome and in a very small package. The down side is you will need a bigger air compressor then a pancake style.
    1 point
  29. Welcome to the forum Elizabeth.B. I assume by all in one you mean a table + lift + router? If I were looking today I would start with the SawStop table and lift and compare others to it. For a router I suggest the big Porter Cable.
    1 point
  30. Dave have you ever seen a ambrosia maple crosstie? I hope it go’s to Houston.
    0 points