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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/25/20 in all areas

  1. Here is my current project
    6 points
  2. A number of years ago, I built my wife a computer desk of white oak with some storage. But it took up and enormous amount of room. Since she's not around to use it any more, I figured I could simplify the space and still have access to the computer. I use her computer for background music when I doing house things. You know, dishes, vacuum, read and sketch stuff. So I built this little table , that might be called an entry table or sofa table. It's made from "very" soft Maple. It's so soft, it made me think that Pine was a hardwood. This Maple is curly, and has a bunch of Sp[alting and
    5 points
  3. It occurred to me I have never posted my shop so here is where I try not to go crazy. This is my carving/inlay/bench. its short ony two feet by 4 feet used only for smaller work. my view from my bench everything is garage sale/craigslist buys bought router table from a retiring woodworking, all the rest were bought from people moving. This is sharpening bench a must for any turner. my stone are in a cupcake carrier I bought from doller store best investment for storage and water well I ever found. eventuly it is were I will store my metal working equipm
    3 points
  4. Looks like the kind of space you can walk into with a cup of coffee and just feel the stress just running out of you. There are times I just walk out into the shop and look around. It sort of resets my aggravation-tolerance level
    3 points
  5. Okay, so I decided that the wood screws were a mistake. They would prevent movement rather than permit it. So they had to go. This is the exchange screw: a 12 gauge stainless steel wood/metal screw with an all-important flat/domed head. The plan was to use a 3/4" forstner bit. This would leave a wide, flat area for the screw head to move along. The range of movement would be the same as before, about 2mm each side of the screw. A MDF template was made to guide the forstner bit, as it had no support in view of the existing hole ... Drilled to depth ...
    3 points
  6. As far as I know, the major fires have been dealt with due to the rain. I was at the airport flying back to Melbourne and all planes were grounded for over 4 hours due to that much rain. One fire that had been burning since September had extinguished as well. It was strange. For a few weeks, all of Facebook, the internet and news were only about the fires. All of a sudden, no one was talking about it and that was before the rain. And there’s always that one guy looking for an opportunity.
    2 points
  7. Mine have come from estate and downsizing sales. There are often some bargains to be had if you're patient.
    2 points
  8. Ya know how ladies get mad when you leave the seat up ....
    2 points
  9. the ceiling is so low that in order to have lights I have to have it above the beams so if I put in ceiling I would be hiting my head on lights and I dont want to buy lights when I had a bunch of cheap shop lights already. plus I need the space above to put ladder ect…. ill stick to the florescent since I have them already. maybe if I ever move. I do need to insulate the roof and garage door for winter/ summer. as for max capacity I want to build a flip top cart so drum sander and planer can share a slot. I someday want to put in a cnc router/ maybe where the grinders are and then move grin
    2 points
  10. thanks guys its been a learning curve to learn this stuff again and realize just how much I liked to paint and how much I have lost just from not practicing.
    2 points
  11. I had 2,300!!! I'll start shopping for a Ford GT or Ferrari tonight! David
    2 points
  12. I love those bit holders. I did 2" oc staggered. These are the trays I made for my router table cabinet:
    2 points
  13. I built these matching bedside tables for a client a while back. She was upgrading from some Ikea tables to "adult tables". These are solid maple with a continuous grain pattern around the case. They are about 25" tall and the case is about 18" square. The drawer is a full extension drawer and the drawer front is figured/tiger maple. Finished with a natural oil and buffed out with wax. I have more details of the build on my blog, but these are a few shots of the finished pieces. I'm about to begin making a matching shelf unit now too.
    1 point
  14. Where i grew up miles upon miles of road ditches would be flooded. No need to get the boat we just hopped on water skis behidn the pickup. It's funny how must pickups have a really awesome place to fasten the tow rope.
    1 point
  15. Some folks do great at finding good Stanley planes at a good price in the used market. Today the used Stanley market seems over-inflated; that's just my opinion. Millers Falls are not so lusted after but, are certainly the equal of Stanleys in many respects. I have a couple of No. 9's (MF numbers reflect approximate inches of length so these are Stanley No. 4 equivalents) and a No. 14 (read Stanley No.5). IIRC they were $30 to $35 pretty much ready to go. It may be that the inflation in used Stanleys has driven folks to other quality names from the past. You will want to know t
    1 point
  16. I like the wood river planes for the money my #5 is still one of my favorite planes.
    1 point
  17. Had to google Gehenna, but now I get it. You know that moniker may just have said it all.
    1 point
  18. Be sure to let us know before you sell. Some of this crowd enjoys restoring and using those old tools, and might offer a decent price.
    1 point
  19. Nathan, I feel your pain as well. Also building a circular table top, I had similar difficulties with the router. Switching to a jigsaw and block plane saved me a lot of grief, and honestly seemed just as fast. But I had enough material to salvage. If you really need to salvage the top, @drzaius is right, banding it will be a problem as the panel moves with humidity changes. Unless you allow the panel room to expand & contract inside the band, it will eventually crack. An option (not a simple one, though) might be to create a flat ring, using material similar to the top, with the
    1 point
  20. its not random I planed everything. the color is balanced where if there is red on one side there is read on the other. if there is yellow on one side there is yellow on the other. and there is green to tie it all together. even the size of the lilly pads are placed so that one side does not look heaver then the other. your eye will start at one side and follow along one edge where most of the inlay will be to the other side using shape and line eventually geting to the dragon fly. im following art elements as though I was doing a painting rather then woodworking.
    1 point
  21. Nice table Rick. Simple, functional and has some fantastic grain.
    1 point
  22. Welcome Nathan, and take comfort in the fact that we've all had days like this. Pictures would help, but it sound like a solid wood glued up top. If so, then you can't really put that band of wood around the edges. With seasonal humidity changes the wood will expand & contract across the grain & disaster will ensue. I had a biscuit show on a prominent edge of an oak cradle that I built. I chiselled out a mortise just large enough to catch all of the offending biscuit & slot & then cut out a plug to fit, selecting the grain to match as closely as I could. I know the patch
    1 point
  23. Wonderful work, Drew. Great documentation.
    1 point
  24. Great looking piece. That top is really too pretty to cover up with anything.
    1 point
  25. I’m not surprised at the quality as I’ve seen your work before. It’s about time you got your ass back out in the shop and made yourself useful! Great looking piece Rick. And stay off the back porch when it’s wet. Another story!
    1 point
  26. I spilt some tequila on it once and it lasted for days. No regrets!
    1 point
  27. I might show the inlay process for the flower but its not that hard a process. I did it with my students in the past and they had no trouble doing it. I probably wont show the whole table until its done. and it might wait until the end of the summer before im done.
    1 point
  28. That’s what I came up with and thus the reason for asking as you said 16” around and to me that meant circumference. Or maybe there was just a comma missing.
    1 point
  29. Here are my router and drawers
    1 point
  30. At just over 1500 subscribers and 250 videos my channel is monetized. I get about 10,000 views per month. I get about $40 a month for that.
    1 point
  31. I cut over a 100 bdft of ambrosia maple lumber today in the rain. Sold 100 bdft of it to a woodworker. Rick, the table looks good.
    1 point
  32. The process of attaching of the legs was completed by the addition of two screws in the sliding dovetail base. Why add screws? The screws are not to prevent the base sliding back (an elongated hole actually encourages this). It is just to prevent the base twisting in, and breaking out of, the socket since there is no glue there to prevent any lateral movement. The force comes from the splayed and angled legs. They will want to cant outward, and this becomes more so when the three drawers are filled and a vase of flowers is placed on the top of the table. I thought that it is wo
    1 point
  33. I can just see your wife or kids coming in with face in phone not paying attention and trying to sit down at one of the chairs. Worst seats ever
    1 point
  34. Seat carving process has started and it is going a LOT faster than I thought it would. I was able to get the first seat done in 4 hours and that wasn't overlapping glue drying time. If I do other operations while glue is drying I could easily get that down further but I won't bother timing it because it doesn't really matter. First step is to select material. I had some nice 10" wide boards from my order of 6/4 Cherry. I figured I'd use 2 pieces to make the seat. In order to do the pre-sculpting though that board gets hacked into parts to be glued back together. Spoiler the grain turned
    1 point
  35. It's time for the drawers. Once again there is a challenge. The design calls for drawer fronts that stretch across the front without being broken by drawer dividers. In other words, "lipped drawers". There are two ways to do this. The easy way is to used "planted fronts", that is, attached fronts to the front of a box ... The hard way is to make the drawer front a single piece. This requires rebating the drawer front and forming a half blind dovetail in the side of the rebate. Courtesy of Christian Becksvoort ... I've chosen the high road (sigh). Today I spent
    1 point