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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/05/2020 in all areas

  1. Well Ladies and gents...it's finally done. I logged in at 210 hours including tearing apart my jointer and learning how to tune that up. Thank you all for your help and guidance along the way. I think I will go make something small now...or just look at it. Bit by bit, hour by hour, I got through it. See ya on the flip side..
    7 points
  2. The hall table for my niece was completed and delivered, but the wedding was postponed owing to Covid-19. Australia locked down early, and we have suffered less than other countries. I realised early on that I would have to change the way I ran my psychology practice, and began to research and gear up for Telehealth using video. I found this quite stressful as I intensely dislike using the telephone (and cannot avoid doing so through the day), fearing that video may have the same impersonal feel. It has been reassuring that it has turned out quite a decent experience, and it will usher in changes in the future for consultations. Distance and mobility may become barriers of the past. Still, the past 6 weeks have been exhausting. Working in front of a screen is intense. I've probably put in 15 hour days owing to the extra admin needed. What has this got to do with woodworking? Well, I really haven't made it into the workshop until about two weekends ago. It is a refuge from the stresses of the world, and I can chill out just tinkering. I managed to tune up all my machines. Do you know that bicycle lights are the best lights for drill presses and bandsaws? Got a couple of them. Attached a spare Wixey to the bandsaw. Love it! Made a rack for router bits. This is sounding desperate. My energy levels are too low to tackle the painting Lynndy wants me to do. I really just want to push a plane around. Blame Rod Cosman. He has a daily video on building drawers. If you can ignore the constant sales pitches, Rob is one of the good guys, and there is always something to pick up. I would watch one episode after the last patient was done, with a coffee and my feet up. <sigh> Well, Rob was using this large shooting board. He likes to shoot with a #5 1/2. The board was nothing special, but it reminded me of a project I had thought about some time back - a shooting board for tuning the long edges of drawer sides. Keep in mind that the drawers I build tend to have sides 6-8mm thick. You cannot plane this accurately in a vise (well, only Warren can). I must say that Rob demonstrated wonderfully precise work, and this rubbed off on me. Hence the interest in creating a shooting board for long edges. Numbers: the runway to the fence is 750mm. The total length is about 880mm. The total width is 450mm. This is a large shooting board. Yet I can reach down it. It is not cumbersome to use. Its principal use is long side edges, but it can shoot ends as well (not to forget that I have a shooting board and plane dedicated to shooting ends). Solid wood? Well, sort of. The choices are MDF and ply. MDF is really not a great choice as it had a hard exterior (good) but soft interior which does its best to imitate a sponge when water is nearby (very bad). It is also very heavy. The plywood in Oz is .. well .. cr@p. There really is no other word to describe it. It is light, since full of voids, and generally looks like a pretzel. It is possible to purchase marine ply, but it is very expensive. My local Bunnings had these laminated panels on special, and they were cheaper than the unspeakable ply. The thicker panels are Merbau, which is heavy and hard. The lighter stuff is unknown and softer. The laminations will minimise movement. The panels were all 300mm wide (12" for those who have not yet entered the modern era). One-and-a half panels made up the base. These were planed down on the jointer and thicknesser, and then joined level with the aid of biscuits (yes, I have one .. damn useful they remain, when most traded theirs in for a Domino. So silly of you .... I have a Domino as well. These machines do different things). I digress. Glued up ... I use mild steel section (covered in tape) for cauls. As good as the results may be out of the thickness/planer, the surface is not going to be flat. I have not used this Marcou in yonks. Traversing to flatten across the grain ... Winding sticks are used to check for twist ... The high spots are marked and planed off ... For fun, I decided to enter the 21st century. Behold, the new winding sticks ... Then it was the turn of the runway. What are the chances that it runs parallel to the platform? Here are two squares on the platform. There is no gap between them as the panel is flat and level ... Now when I take them over to the runway, it can be seen that this is not parallel ... The next task is to plane the runway, checking along its length ... until you get this ... Next step: remove the fence from a Small Plow (plough!) and run a 1/4" groove along the side of the runway/base of the platform ... This is for dust, to keep the corner of the runway clear. Next step: shoot the rebate for the blade. I use a Veritas LA Jack. It does not matter much as I have three planes I could use, and the other two (seen shortly) have similar dimensions (the blade is about 6mm above the sole) ... This electrified router plane was used to create mortices for T-slots .. Now the fence could be attached. It is aligned with the blade rebate, and squared to a plane. I use a little glue to set it, then screw it on from above and below ... Here is the side fence being morticed ... Finally ... ! Here is the shooting board ... Shooting the sides of a drawer with a Veritas Custom #7 (the advantage of this plane is that it has a 40 degree frog, so can shoot end grain, plus with the chipbreaker it will plane sides very cleanly) ... Remove the side fence, close up the outer runner, and use the LN #51 to shoot ends ... The underside of the board is covered in rubber underlay ... This is as the long shooting board with live under the table saw and be used on the outboard ... I am not sure if this build was just a way of having some fun, or whether it will get serious use. Either way, it was time well spent. Stay safe. Regards from Perth Derek
    2 points
  3. I’ve used Osmo Poyx (Satin and Gloss) on a handful of projects, and I think the biggest attraction of the Osmo is for people who don’t want a "plastic" finish. With the Osmo, the oil seeps into the wood while the wax stays on top so the feel of a finished project is a smooth natural feel of the wood. Believe it or not, this finish has been around for 40 years or so, but since it’s made in Germany, maybe they just recently decided to expand their markets beyond Europe. It has always been a finish for floors, but now more people have been using it on furniture and other things. Even though all their products are labeled as food safe, they carry another line, Osmo Top Oil, which is supposed to be safe to use finishing cutting boards/butcher blocks. I’ve bought some of this to try, but haven’t had time to make a cutting board since buying it. When applying the Osmo Polyx on walnut, or any open grain wood, after flooding the surface, you can use a green Scotch Brite pad to rub the Osmo on the surface, create a slurry, and this will fill the grain on these woods. The final coats on open grain or all coats on closed grain woods work best when applied with the white pads, which are softer and leave no scratch marks. These 2 tables I’ve finished with Osmo Polyx Satin, and I’m happy with how they came out.
    2 points
  4. Yeah, I'm with you. A lot of what comes out of the TV is just crap, better to have hearing protection.
    2 points
  5. Didn't bother me. Me too!
    2 points
  6. They used to ask for the brake mechanism back if it was involved in a flesh contact incident. I guess the brake unit actually collects information as to what was going on at the time mechanically.
    1 point
  7. I am a lefty....it happens. As far as first projects: a step stool for my daughter. I also need to come to terms with some sort of tool cabinet or wall. Whatever it is needs to be anchored to the foundation wall, or dropped from the joists. What’s been your experience with cabinet vs wall? Well...210 hours and a lot of learning later, WE ARE DONE. Thanks to all of y’all for your help and encouragement along the way. Now, I think I will build something simple, like a small stool for my daughter. Or a baby rattle.
    1 point
  8. I don't buy much from Amazon, but I understand they're selling all manner of household goods, from the necessities to the niceties, and that people are relying on Amazon for their purchases rather than risk an in person encouter at the store only to find an empty shelf. What I heard is that faced with a large increase in items ordered Amazon is focusing on delivering the necessities over the niceties. So as much I don't like the company I have to give them credit for sacrificing their reputation with some customers to keep others stocked with needs.
    1 point
  9. So, Corona killed Amazon. It did not kill FedEx. I gifted a stand mixer for my wife’s bday. That came FedEx in two days. I ordered a negative attachment for conversion to digital with my camera. That came FedEx FROM JAPAN (eBay...eBay from Japan has never let me down) in three days. Meanwhile Amazon is holding orders in limbo. I don’t mean that to be a complaint. I just find the differences fascinating.
    1 point
  10. Hey... um ... someone installed the vises on the wrong ends of the bench you made for me . Looks great! Do you have a first project in mind?
    1 point
  11. A fun project for my Grandson.
    1 point
  12. Cute idea, very creative.
    1 point
  13. Yes, I made mine to hollow the wedge area down to depth when making side escapement hand planes. As a side note: to shape the Allen wrench easily I heated to cherry red (dull), then let air cool to soften the steel. Once softened it can be file or ground to shape. When you have the shape you want, reheat again, directing most of the heat around the heel (ankle) of the Allen wrench... allowing the red to grow toward the cutting edge, then quench quickly into a can of vegetable oil to cool. At this stage it will be very brittle so take care not to break it... treat it like glass. There will be carbon (blackened) all over the wrench that should be removed using fine sandpaper and to leave a shiny metal surface. The shiny surface is needed for the next step (annealing). To anneal, place the Allen wrench into a 375 degree pre heated oven for about 40 minutes... or until the color of the steel is a straw color (not hay color). Once it reaches a straw color, you can remove and let cool to room temperature. The annealing softens the outer portion of the steel while the internal part is still quite hard. It can now be sharpened with whetstones/diamond stones/or wet dry methods.
    1 point
  14. There were a number of photos and comments I might have added, but thought that I had probably said too much already. One of the photos omitted was with clamps. I decided against the T-track style clamps here (as some may know, I have used them elsewhere) as they are too directional, which limits their range of cover. The side fence does not just travel parallel to the runway, but can be angled so, for example, one can hold an out-of-square board or deliberately plane a taper. As the end of the board will not sit flush against the far fence, clamps are helpful to prevent movement (this is unnecessary when the side fence is parallel). The clamps can be moved along the side fence, as needed. That is the reason for the many holes you see ... Regards from Perth Derek
    1 point
  15. It may walk away from you ! Woodworker's feet !!! toes missing !
    1 point
  16. Home for lunch. I imagine there are other companies that make stuff equally as good, but I don't know of anything better. It's what I would still use. Back before they came out with Emerald, Duration was the top of the line. I painted an old house with Duration in 2008 (many have been 2007). It's been pressure washed most years, and still looks like we just painted it after it's pressure washed. I put a piece of blue masking tape in an inconspicuous place, and painted over it with Duration, on that house. I looked at it last week when I cut the grass there, and that piece of masking tape is still right where I put it. That was interior masking tape. The Duration is still keeping the weather off of it just fine, and all the edges are still sealed all the way around it. I haven't checked to see what the current sale price is, but hopefully it'll be either 30, or 40% off, which it often is.
    1 point
  17. Got the doors hung as well as the drawers. I am gluing up poplar for the drawer faces. A few more details. Having it off the floor is much better for my old bones. I like this collapsible table.
    1 point
  18. Must be modeled after Bigfoot. Only 4 toes.
    1 point
  19. More progress on the digital movie poster frame today First up I made a quick template to route out an exhaust and entrance for the fan that will be used to pull the hot air out. The fresh air inlet is on the bottom right. Then I glued up the frame There will be an inner friction fit frame so i added a 1/8" round over to the inside edge to make installation easier. I will do the same thing on the inner frame Then I glued it up and did a quick test fit After gluing the back on I made the inner frame Then I mounted it After a few connections I installed the TV and then test fit the inner frame before gluing it up Just need to knock out the face trim and this one will be a wrap.
    1 point
  20. And the TV commercials telling us that they're going to send refunds aren't free, either.
    1 point
  21. Amazing that car accidents are down over 50% but insurance companies are only offering 15-25% back. I bet if accidents went up by 50% our bills would increase by more than 25%.
    1 point
  22. CS, a sharp knife will work. However a fishtail chisel makes the work much easier (since you are pushing forward and not cutting sideways) and will probably do so with greater orecision. Regards from Perth Derek
    1 point
  23. That's the money slot ... er card slot.
    1 point
  24. To my Southern US ear, British, New Yorker, and Creole accents are just as difficult to follow. O'm certain that my accent is just as difficult for them. I once saw a bit the Discovery Channel where a speech expert tried to identify the origin of the Australian english accent. She placed it as a blend of Scottish, Welsh, and "drunk". True story.
    1 point
  25. I have not, but I have used Livos Kunos - similar product on sapele.
    1 point
  26. So been working on several things in the basement kinda flipping around becuase of the quarantine and lack of supplies but here is the current status of things. Bar cabinets were on hold waiting for plywood but I finally went and bought some quality oak ply at Forest Products Supply last Friday. They were pretty good to work with ordered over the phone and they wheeled it out when I got there. Also picked up the hard wood for the face frames, doors, and the bath vanity. Should be set for a while now The 8/4" was supposed to be 8' long when I mentioned it they said they lost that piece so gave me a 12', works for me. On a side note that flag made it 54 miles home Here is the current status of the bar cabinets. I dyed the wine rack/ microwave cabinet ebony I also made the back cabinet (prefinished plywood) and the drawer cabinet Then I knocked out a pool que rack Today I received more supplies hinges, drawer slides, and some more dye. Oh and some blind shelf brackets I am going to use for a small drink shelf in the hallway for those playing darts. and a couple tools I thought I needed... I started with one Auriou rasp a couple years ago now I think I have 6 . I started using them on my sculpted bar stool project and now find myself grabbing them more often. While working on the cue rack i needed a grain between the 11 and 15 I had so now I have a 13 too Still waiting on the cordless palm router that goes with the Bosch set. Unfortunately you can't buy the Bosch cordless palm router in a set you have to buy the battery and charger separately so instead of dropping $75 on those items I got this set for $150, thought the offset head would come in handy plus now I have two batteries.
    1 point
  27. So been working on the bar cabinets the last couple of weekends. Unfortunately we lost the main lumber supplier I have used for the last couple of decades so finding materials has been a bit of a challenge. For three of the four cabinets I wanted prefinished maple plywood and the forth I will use red oak. All will have either stained or dyed black face frames and doors. Anyway I decided to go with some sheet goods I found at Menards. First the good the prefinished mystery plywood is actually not to bad and for $54 a sheet about half the cost of the cabinet supplier. The red oak was well lets just say S%^$ not sure what this mystery wood really is but I think it will work since its only one cabinet and will be stained black. First up I broke down the ply in the driveway Then final cut the sides for each cabinet to size and marked for the face, dado's, etc Ne I cut the dado's and toe kick relief To get the curve of the wall I made a cardboard template and then used it to mark the shelf's A quick test fit before glue up I also cut an opening for the Bluetooth speaker controls Then glued it up This is where things got interesting...checking angles corner to corner I am within a 1/32" but when I put the square on it both sides showed bowed out, I was like WTH?? Two days later it dawned on me the shelf was bowed down...facepalm! Not a big deal because when I add the back, wine racks, and face frames I can get it squared up but it took me way longer then it should have to determine that LOL Next up were the wine bottle holders. After thinking this through I decided a full scale plan was the way to go so I grabbed a piece of 1/4" ply and drew out the design on the back Then milled up the wood Using my kumiko jig I was able to get consistent dado's on the stock, you can see the small pin I referenced off of on the right One knocked out Then the second Glued them up, all the spring clamps from my kayak build came in handy I cleaned up the edges on the bandsaw and edge sander after using the plywood layout to mark them first one being test fit then brought out a couple bottles just to see how they would look. The openings probably could have been a little smaller but should work fine. With slots for 21 bottles here and room for another 40 in the cooler we should be set
    1 point