Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/05/20 in all areas

  1. Sharp knives should do better than what you are getting. The other face (your reference surface) has been jointed true, yes? In case it helps, this curly maple is right off the planer and just being laid out for joinery. The small pieces in the upper left have had more attention.
    3 points
  2. We took a direct hit, but got Very lucky. Our place is the highest hill around, and surrounded on three sides by water that any wind has a long fetch across. When it blows from those directions, the wind speed gets increased as it gets pushed up the terrain rise. Last night, the storm passed just to the East of us, so the wind was out of the North. That's the one direction we have protection from. We lost some trees in the stand of timber to the North of the house, but none to amount to anything. We don't even have limbs to pick up in the yard. The point has been waiting for water,
    3 points
  3. Minor update on this audio rack; turns out the straight knives on my jointer were not giving me the clean edge I thought I was getting on the Curly Maple. When I moved the boards into different light and looked at them closer I saw the tear out in a few places. I made some changes and ran them again but with the same results. So, today I ordered a Shelix cutterhead for my PM54A jointer. For now this project is waiting on the new cutterhead. I have wanted one for a while and never wanted to spend the money but this project is worthy of an equipment change. Besides, any project that re
    3 points
  4. I have no experience with a helical head, but have read plenty of others'experience. Don't expect a no-tearout result just from switching heads. I've had success reducing tearout by wetting the surface just prior to jointing or planing.
    2 points
  5. @drzaius If he's still up with you, check out the Home Depot kids workshop kits. Pre-covid they were free in store events but now you can buy the kids for $8-10. They might be too easy for a 7 year old, but if he hasn't used tools it could be okay. My 5.5 year old has been doing them since she was 3 and she still loves them.
    2 points
  6. My DIL has a sister (lives on the other side of the country) who is an extremely unfit parent, so they have taken on legal guardianship of he 7 YO son. So now I am his defacto grandfather. His other grandfather is a turd and has nothing to do with the boy. Anyway, they are camping with us and we went on a hike. He's never been camping or hiking and is loving it. We've really hit it off and enjoy each other's company a lot. Poor kid has been through a lot and it's going to take a lot of time and love to make things right. But he's a great kid and sure wants to belong to a family
    2 points
  7. I've reached a tipping point with living with my 6" jointer and an upgrade has moved to the top of the tool priority list. I'm in a small basement shop so getting a big jointer in there is not realistic. A combo machine doesn't suit my workflow. So really the only option I have would be to build one myself, ala Matthias Wandel and John Heisz. Their builds used a cutterhead from a lunchbox planer. Matthias also used the motor from the planer, John used an induction motor. They both made the tables out of plywood skinned with thick sheet metal. That's the part that I really had misgivings
    1 point
  8. I just bought a 6 year old, 6 ton single phase gas pack, for $500, that works fine, and has never needed any repair. An HVAC guy that I have done some favors for, called me, and asked if I could unload it off his trailer with a loader. I asked him if he had plans for it. He said no. I asked him what he wanted for it, and when he told me, I told him we could unload it right here. It's going in the mechanic/metal shop building that has only had a wood heater. I bought a heat pump, a while back with a similar deal, that I had planned to use, but found a better use for that. I didn't really
    1 point
  9. @Bmac you may want to save alittle more of your egg money. I will have some curly white oak lumber. Don’t worry about the Houston Boy getting any, he has all rooster’s and no egg’s!
    1 point
  10. You will be very happy with the Shelix head. I have replaced both my jointer and planer heads. While I do get some minor tear out with curly maple, it is greatly reduced. I get no tear out with other figured/squirrely wood.
    1 point
  11. I just looked. Those are the ones I got the other day.
    1 point
  12. From what I've read the electric motors have an edge in power over the gas ones. If i were doing a mill that was stationary I'd probably go electric.
    1 point
  13. Matt Cremona says his big sawmill costs about $13k (plus stupid amounts of labor) and it's an electric motor so no worries about maintaining a gas motor.
    1 point
  14. 1 point