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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/20/20 in Posts

  1. I have a dial caliper that is graduated in 1/64" increments (no decimals). I can easily read 1/2 or even 1/4 the way between the marks but seldom do I need to be that accurate. Hell, 1/4 of 1/64 is (grabbing calulator) about .004". Good enuff.
    5 points
  2. Got Andy Klein's 20" vise in the mail today. Box was tied and banged up so I hope nothing missing or damaged
    3 points
  3. I find digital hand held devices with greater than 1/64th increments to be frustrating as well. I have a few items. The one that has no range setting and uses 128ths has set in a drawer for years. Once I get to 128ths, I'm measuring off the piece. I don't try to cut a 1-7/128" tenon to fit a 1-7/128" mortise ;-)
    3 points
  4. a dial for me, and one with a yellow back would be nice, the less things in my shop that need batteries the better. Just my opinion of course
    3 points
  5. For me it's dial. I have had an electronic caliper for a year or two but recently bought a dial from Veritas and haven't thought about the digital since. Besides the battery issue I find the numeric display hard to interpret. I am usually looking to turn a piece to a 1/4" wall. So when I measure with calipers I want to know how close I am. If the digital reads .2977 well 2 times out of three I know that's more than 1/4, but how much. With the dial I know at a glance if it's way over, some, a bit or a smidge. Now if I was a machinist sorting ball bearings I'd want the digital
    3 points
  6. A couple of big steps toward the finish line. I now have the deck attached to the hull. To start the process I attached the deck via packing tape and then it was turned on it's side; I mixed a thickened mixture of epoxy and had to basically crawl into the kayak. Here's a look at the joint prior to filleting with epoxy; Here are the tools I'll use; This is the epoxy fillet placed; After the fillet is placed I wetted glass tape and I'll be rolling this into the seam; Here's a few pics with the tape in place; After 24 hrs the
    2 points
  7. No one is farther behind on building a bench from accumulated parts, than me. I don't even remember how many years it's been. There's always something else to do. Today, I met with the group that owns the 1798 house. They got a 200k grant, and are ready for me to star to work rebuilding the stone basement. That pushes the bench down the list some more. I told them the best I'd be able to do would be three days on that, and then the other two days of a work week on stuff for myself, and what other people need. Don't know that bench will ever get built. 2" Acme stainless steel s
    2 points
  8. This discussion comes around every couple of years. I think most of it comes down to the type of work we do as hobbyists vs. pros. A shaper is great for moldings and edge profiles, but how can it do with cutting away from tge edge, or jigged cuts like box joints? Shaper wins the power argument every time, but a router table offers more versatility, and can be used outside the table, which a shaper can not. But if my work involved lots of repeated edge profiles, you csn bet my shop would have a shaper.
    2 points
  9. I have a digital caliper (can't remember the brand) that I really like, but just sitting in the case, the battery will die in month or two. Fortunately, the battery easily slides out, so I just remove it when I put it away.
    2 points
  10. Differences in the vertical gaps can be more easily seen from drawer to drawer. So, once you have all the gaps adjusted as evenly as possible, trim the sides just enough to make those gaps more even. @wtnhighlander is right when he says that this sort of thing takes more patience than skill. Frustration and patients rarely go hand in hand, so take a break from the project for a day or two. I don't think there's any one of us that hasn't experience this sort of thing. You can get through it and end up with something to be proud of.
    2 points
  11. Cliff, I would be more concerned about all the drawers closing flush. If that part is good, close them and wipe some mineral spirits to show the post-finish color. You may find that the variance you see now is greatly diminished in appearance. Or go watch videos of traditional japanese cabinetmakers building cases with perfect waterfall grain match and hidden dovetail mitered corners, filled with piston-fit drawers, all made with hand tools. Then realize what you are doing requires patience more than skill, calm down, and work it through. I am confident that you can come as close to being
    2 points
  12. @Mark J made a good point about the digital displays. The cheap one I have shows fractions as an option. Seems handy for us inch-bound American woodworkers, right? Accept for the headache you get from trying to interpret a reading that bounces between 3/16" and 25/128"...
    2 points
  13. All my Scientist friends drive Tesla's. I haven't kept up with which models though. We thought about getting one, when Pam was needing a new car, but the range just won't work for us out here in the boonies yet. Her new Subaru has all the electronic safety stuff, which she keeps turned on. I don't like driving it because I use the line on the inside of turns as surface to change turn radius's, without even thinking about it. The car wants to argue with me through every turn.
    2 points
  14. Just stop then. It's not worth it to get that worked up over gaps. Do you have space to clamp a block inside the case? I'd adjust the slides by clamping a block tight against the slide. I'd then loosen the screws and insert a couple playing cards and tighten the screws back down. If you use the same number of cards you could easily walk a gap up by an even amount etc. Also less than 1/64th out of square over 2 feet is pretty dang good i don't know that any of my drawers are ever that close.
    2 points
  15. I have an inexpensive HF digital caliper, and a couple of nice dial calipers, inherited from my machinist FIL. The HF unit seems solid and accurate, for the price point, but the batteries are ALWAYS dead. Doesn't bother me much, I mostly use them to transfer dimensions directly from part A to part B.
    2 points
  16. Hmmm, I don't have an edge bander or a multi-spindle dove-tail machine either. Not a specifically correct statement but, a home or small shop may use a half a dozen profiles in one day. A pro shop will run ogee raised panels by the dozen. A small shop may only do one-offs, sometimes pairs. The focus and target audience of the tools are different. I do not dislike or fear shapers. I just don't do the quantity of work that might qualify for one. At the small end of the scale my router table is used for keyhole slots, 3/16" rabbets on small boxes and picture frames, 1/8" grooves for st
    1 point
  17. I gotta build the bench top it goes in. Well see which of us win
    1 point
  18. Part of the insurance cost is the repair cost factor. Cars like the Subaru with cameras behind the windshield require OEM glass which costs more then non-OEM. Look up how much room is needed to calibrate the cameras for repairs. I think Toyota’s need 300’. Have you ever seen a body shop that’s 300’ long with nothing in front?
    1 point
  19. I do the same with a lot of these things that run on button batteries.
    1 point
  20. I am going to raise the question is it even mahogany? Unless that floor was laid a hundred years ago I doubt that it is true (Honduran) mahogany, which has become hard to come by and quite expensive. If it is a recently installed floor it could possibly be a mahogany veneer as Cestnut suggested, but most likely it's a mahogany substitute such as Khaya (aka African "mahogany"). I suggest Khaya because the floor in the picture has a lot of yellow tones which is not typical of true mahogany. This is something I posted a while back, the base piece is Honduran mahogany, but it's a build j
    1 point
  21. Bases? Hmmm, my thought would have been A**es!
    1 point
  22. This just brings up more questions. Is it a true hardwood floor or an engineerd product? A species like that is less common to see in a typical 3/4" tongue and grove product. The reason I ask is, can it even be refinished? If it's an engineered product and the veneer is thin, then probably not, and for sure not without a lot of skill. Beings that you are looking to buy the house and don't own it get a flooring professional's opinion. Find a company that can do a free site visit and explain the situation and what you want and see if it's possible. In the region I live it is common to bring
    1 point
  23. It is interesting to think about. They are essentially trying to insure an unknown. I know the self driving industry can claim that it's safer but one software glitch could have a huge impact on claims. Also the unknown on liability is huge. If you were to ask me to quote a unknown table project I'm going to shoot high as it's easier to adjust down.
    1 point
  24. I'm sorry. I didn't mean to do that to you.
    1 point
  25. I guess the brand is Pigma. I've seen them at Hobby Lobby and Blick's. Here's a picture: A lot of people prefer to burn their signatures and that's probably best. My name is long and my hand writting is crap so I came up with a hallmark and had a branding iron made. I use the archival pen to put a number and date on the piece.
    1 point
  26. I have this Tesa caliper I bought from Amazon on 2013 and I have yet to change the battery. It's a very basic model, but I don't need more functions.
    1 point
  27. I think dial are a good way to go. I needed a good caliper for something a while ago and bought one of these. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00IG46NL2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 My order date on amazon says Apr 18th, 2015 and I have yet to change the battery. This is interesting on digital calipers.
    1 point
  28. Megan drives a newer subaru and that car hates me as well. I'm either following too closely driving over lines or am not stopping fast enough. The programing just wasn't designed for city driving, the funny part is I'm one of the better people on the road.
    1 point
  29. Not in great depth. There weren't any dealers in a reasonable distance that had any to test drive or look at. I looked at it online, and I think there is a lot to like about it. I don't remember the specifics but when I went to price it out it ended up close enough to the cost of the Tesla that I didn't pursue it any further. One downside to Tesla is that currently insurance companies are charging more for them than other EVs or similar ICE cars. I am hoping that they will start to differentiate between cars with and without the full self driving computer/software, which I think is what i
    1 point
  30. I think you're right. White oak is really tough wood. One needs to pay close attention to the grain as well. One thing I did to ease entry of the pin was to round off the business end of it I relieved the edges of the entry hole in the tenon & the back hole of the mortise. Without that, I doubt if I'd have gotten away with much more than 1/16". I was surprised by the force with which the joint is pulled together. No clamps needed at all.
    1 point
  31. My progress after another 2 and half hours. I've honestly just about had it. Each time I slide a drawer in I slam it a little harder. Pretty soon I'll be picking up the entire thing and throwing it. My frustration level is extremely high. My plan is to make these adjustments, moving the sides up where there are up arrows. then I'm chamfering and making sure everything is flush on the front with sanding, etc. I know how this became so problematic (using a tape measure to get my spacer measurements, so I'll take that as a lesson learned. In addition, there were a couple of dra
    1 point
  32. I have a digital calipers (not sure of the brand) but I went bought a pair of Starrett a couple years back becuase I got tired of the batteries being dead when I needed them. Mine have a light yellow back so very easy to read.
    1 point
  33. I have one cheap 6", and one Mitutoyo. I also have some dial calipers, but can't remember wanting to use them since I bought the cheap digital ones. There's something comforting about those extra places beyond 1 thou. I can't remember how old the cheap ones are, but they still work as good as they ever did. The Mitutoyo is some better, all the way around. The cheap one does eat batteries faster than you would want, but I haven't had the Mitutoyo long enough to see how long the batteries last. I bought the Mit because a friend borrowed my cheap one, and I thought that would
    1 point
  34. Okay, I'm gonna be the contrarian here. Zoom in a bit on that photo & have a closer look at the gaps. Honestly, they need work, both the vertical & horizontal. The grain selection is stellar and that just accentuates the bad gaps. If it was made of walnut stained knotty pine (I feel dirty just typing that), no one would care. Take a couple of hours to fix it up & you'll be glad you did. That wood & hardware is top notch & deserves it.
    1 point
  35. So i left of trying to pick out material for the doors. I had the panel material set aside from the begging of the project but getting strait grain fro the rails and stiles was the trick. I think I managed to get it all figured out. almost all of the material is rift to quarter sawn stock. This was accomplished by taking the edges from wider thicker stock and milling to size. After all the stock was selected and locations were assigned. I took the pieces to the table saw and cut everything to length. I used a miter gauge for this as it's so far my most accurate way to get cross cuts
    1 point
  36. I think dust will stick to anything, but semi-gloss or gloss will be easier to wipe or blow the dust off. I did my shop in semi-gloss & the dust just blows right off.
    1 point