Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/26/20 in all areas

  1. Finished! Thanks all for watching, and to those that gave advice, super appreciated.
    8 points
  2. Even if you just have one door that needs finishing, do yourself a favor and build a rotisserie. A screw is the pivot. Make the bars that you screw to the ends of the door some narrower than the door thickness. These are something over 30 years old. I don't bother to keep stretchers for them, but just use whatever is laying around. Anyone can spray like an expert when the surface is horizontal. With these, you spray one side, let it tack up, and spin the door over to do the other side. I have enough of these to do a whole house full of doors, but was only painting two this evening.
    4 points
  3. Yes sir, ride it out. We evacuated several years ago, only to drive east in the wrong direction. Spent 22 hours to get to a 4 hour destination. Had we gone west like my daughters family, we could have played a round of golf. The way my golf game is, not sure which would have been worse. Wish we could send the rain,to @Chet‘s direction where it’s needed. Thanks for asking.
    4 points
  4. We got lucky. No rain, and there were only three tiny sets of insect tracks. I had them sprayed a little before 8:30, and hung before 10. Not my normal fastidious system, but the rotisseries, and airless rig got the job done before it could have been done any other way. We installed the four handrails in the bathroom, and shower while the paint was drying. Pam went to pick up my Mother, while I stayed home, cleaned up, and picked up all the tools. All settled in now, but I still have a truck load of tools to put away, and the airless rig to clean. I'm going to wait on the sprayer until the shade gets around there late this evening. The pickup, and gun are in a bucket of water. This was while the paint was still wet. Good enough for fast work. I hate deadlines, and don't normally do them, but this was different than paying work anyway.
    3 points
  5. Looks like it will skirt us to the east at the Texas/Louisiana border so we're good! Thanks
    3 points
  6. About a year ago I read Nick Offerman's book. It's a pretty fun read if you have not read it. In that book, he has a picture of a table designed and built by George Nakashima. It's this picture: When I saw that picture I was immediately smitten with this design. To my eye this table is somehow both complex and simple at the same time. I knew when I saw the table I needed it on my todo list. I could not start on the table right away. I had to remodel our kitchen which took an incredible amount of time. I had to build some shelves. I also built a small counter top for our laundry room. All that took many months. Too many months. And all through those months I could not get this table out of my head. And now that we are in the dead of the summer here in Arizona.....where it has been around 117 degrees for a couple of weeks.....I have finally been able to get started. I did some googleing and found some more pictures of the table to emulate. I was also able to find some rough plans: I now have enough enthusiasm and knowledge to be very dangerous. So I went and bought some wood! The 4 boards on the right are 8/4 white oak, these will make up the table top. These are 10 feet long. My table is only 6 feet but they only sell them in full lengths. I will have a lot of big off cuts. White oak is my favorite so I suppose having some extra white oak kicking around is not a bad thing. The board on the far left is 12/4 white oak. I SHOULD be able to get all the pieces needed for the base out of just that one board. We'll see though. Just getting these monster boards out of the truck and into my garage by myself took some mental (and physical) gymnastics but I did it. I am building the base first and I will do the top last. My reasoning is that if I were to glue up the table top, which will be 3'x6' then that top is going to be very heavy. Way too heavy for me to move by myself safely. And at that size the top will probably be in the way in my small shop/garage and would require being moved around a lot. But the individual boards, while still heavy, are much easier to move around. For the base I am starting from the ground up. I'll make the long "runner" that runs along the floor first, then the "feet" that sick out to either side, then angled "legs" and end with the cross pieces at the top of the legs. To make the base I need to turn that large 12/4 board into smaller boards. As you can imagine, this took a bit of time. But I rather enjoyed it. Here is what you are looking at in the above pic. I jointed and planed the long floor runner (I don't really know what to call that thing) and that is what you are seeing on the right, it's just under 5' long. To it's left, that large piece will be the "legs". That piece is just over 5' long, it will be cross cut directly down the middle for the legs. Below the leg piece is the part I will be using for the feet. And below the already milled piece is where I will get the cross supports that will be the top of the legs. I ended up ripping all 10' of that board by hand. I was not as sore as I thought I would be, but I did get more blisters than I thought I would. All of those parts got crosscut and milled. Now for the REALLY fun stuff. The joinery! Starting with the Floor Runner and the Feet. This is the runner. It gets a notch. I cut close to the line then did relief cuts. Chisel out then waste trying hard not to blow out the back side. Establish my marking lines. Not flawless but she's square and my knife lines ended up perfect. Now for the feet. This joint is a little trickier. Need to make this lap on both sides, so mark it, cut it, chisel it. Clean up with the router plane. Then clean up with the chisel. I need to make a notch in the foot that will correlate to the notch in the runner. Same exact steps as the others. Cut. Rough chisel work. Then some fine chisel work. Ready for a dry fit. Fits very snug. I actually had to plane the sides of the runner a little bit to get the joint to seat fully. Here is the bottom which no one will see. Here is the top looking VERY sharp. And both feet done! I have left everything long. I will not cut the runner or the feet to their final width until I have the table top made. That way I will have a much better sense of proportions. Next I will work on the legs. The leg joinery will be very similar to the joinery for the feet but this time the runner will be getting the laps on the sides and the legs will just receive the notch. Anyone know what the name of that joint is? I assume it is some kind of bridle joint. Housed Bridle Joint? Lapped Bridle Joint? Well whatever it's called it was my first time doing it. I spent an embarrassing amount of time trying to figure out how to mark everything. Thanks for taking the time to look. I'll keep updating as I get stuff done, but don't hold your breath, I do not get much opportunity to do much woodworking. I currently have no time for the next 2 weeks. But I'll keep plugging along. If anyone sees any red flags that I am overlooking please shout them out. I still very much consider myself a beginner and could use the help of you veterans.
    2 points
  7. I like it. Not as well as ARS but one coat really makes it worth it. The drawer fronts are actually kin dried from my local hardwood guy. Saw this board and grabbed it when I bought my new planer. The rest of the case walnut is air dried.
    2 points
  8. I think that is what I will do. Something like this pic?
    2 points
  9. You say impact driver but do you already have a cordless drill? Usually you stick with one brand and share the batteries between them. I would also say you don't really need an impact for building cabinets and without experience it can get you into trouble. A drill with a clutch gives you more feedback on how hard the screw is going in and won't over do it. An impact driver can really easily drive a screw deeper than you intended in softer material or twist the head off in harder material (with cheap screws anyway). But the impact is easier on your wrist than driving screws with a drill. You just have to have a light touch with it for finer work where a drill with a clutch is fairly idiot proof. 12v drills/impacts are very capable for drilling for and driving screws. I have a 3/8" M12 Milwaukee and I like it. Only complaint is it makes an annoying beeping sound at low speed that my M18 drill doesn't do. You can't really go wrong with Milwaukee or Makita. If you are getting a drill, I would suggest don't get a hammer drill as your primary drill. Handy to have around if you're building a house, but the hammers still move around even when they aren't in hammer mode and seem to make the chuck loosen up more easily than a regular drill and are just generally annoying.
    2 points
  10. Especially if you are spraying outside. Turn the tip around, and spray what's in the line back into the can, using water to push waterbourne through. As soon as you see it thinning out, or losing color, stop. A little bit of water won't hurt a thing. If I'm outside, with the tip turned around, I spray the now thinned down remnants in the hose out of some grass. Stop, and put some clear water in the bucket you are drawing out of, and rinse off the pickup with the hose. Keep spraying until it comes out clear. The stuff on the grass will be gone the next cutting, or second if it's short, never to be seen again. If you are going to spray again tomorrow, or a few hours later, put plenty of water in the bucket that lets you submerge the gun. Just drop it in until the next coat. If you're done, suck some Pump Saver through the rig. As soon as it comes out of the gun, the rig is filled. Take the tip out, make sure it's clean under running water, and put it back in. You're set until the next time. I reuse Pump Saver too, if I'm careful enough not to push paint back in the container. The bottle. has a big enough top, as seen in the picture, that the pickup can go right in the bottle. If I'm spraying somewhere that it's not okay of spray it out on the grass, I'll run it down a sink, and run plenty of water behind it. A kitchen sink with garbage disposal opening is ideal. I know people think it's a lot of trouble to clean them, but once you get used to it, it's a whole lot less trouble than using a brush, or roller. This pump is at least 30 years old. At some point, I finally figured out to lay an old sheet over it when I'm painting. You can see how crusted it is with old paint, but the gauge was added after I got smart enough to start covering it. That plastic box came from Home Depot, and is the ideal setup for an airless rig. It keeps everything together. All you have to do is lift the pickup over the low side, and put it into a container. When it goes back in the box, it goes in the bottle of Pump Saver. The plastic jar in the back right contains all the different tips. Primer was slow drying in the humidity, so I decided to wait until tomorrow for the finish coat of paint. The gun, and pickup are waiting in the bucket until tomorrow.
    2 points
  11. While I agree with all the comments above, I'll toss in that my method for cutting thin rips is a foot-long piece of 2x6 with a 'heel' screwed to one end. Thin cut is between blade and fence, and the push block is sacrificial, runs right across the blade. I like the longer block because it helps me hold the board to the table behind the blade without having to reach over it. I'll burn through a lot of 2x6 before I approach the Gripper's cost. But again, if you use it properly, it is likely the safer solution.
    2 points
  12. It will probably outlast all of us. And regarding looseness of the bridle 'forks', that is the perfect application for plane shaving shims. Glue them to the part that the bridle fits over, they'll never be seen. Alternatively, have you considered draw-boring that joint?
    2 points
  13. Just to add more food for thought. I love my Grr-Rippers but, do use a Marc Adams 'tadpole' type block and something very like what Naomi shows as well. It doesn't have to be rocket science to be safe but, somewhat-rocket-science is available ;-) I prefer the Grr-Rippers when I need to control the cutoff.
    1 point
  14. Just for the sake of newbs reading...riving knife yes, overtopping guard no?
    1 point
  15. Maloof used plugged screws. My thought with the draw bore peg is cut the peg short and then make a face grain plug to hide the draw bore. I was goign to suggest epoxy as well but the plane shaving will work just as well if not better and might be easier to do. Though if you want belt and suspenders do both.
    1 point
  16. You and yours stay safe @Coop, sounds like you’ve done all the things that need to be done to ride it out, come to Iowa if you need shelter and I could use some good help in the shop, and we’ve had only one hurricane that I can remember
    1 point
  17. That looks great cliff i like the desing and the hardware with the desk. I need to try the stuff.
    1 point
  18. That's ok, I like easy questions. Hard ones require greater use of diminishing brain cells! David
    1 point
  19. I may lose those two doors. I probably waited too late to start painting them. It must have been after 7 when I started. The big mistake was doing it a different way than I have always done it. There was some water based primer left from another job-Sherwin-Wiliams Wall & Wood, so I used that. This was the first time using water based primer on doors. Our humidity was still high near dark, and it hadn't done much drying. We've been pushing hard to get the changes made before we go pick up my 104 year old Mother, to bring her home tomorrow at 10:30 in the morning. Everything is not going to get done. I still have handrails to put up in the bathroom, and a pocket door to hang, and trim out. I just turned these two doors up on edge, to have a little possibility of protection from dew, or rain. We'll see in the morning if they are trash, or can be sanded out.
    1 point
  20. If I have multiple thin pieces to cut, I use a little stop thingy from Rockler that allows you to move the fence and board toward the blade after each cut. If it’s a one off, then I go for the Gripper.
    1 point
  21. I guess that was a stupid question. Not sure what I was thinking?
    1 point
  22. Rubio monocoat I really think it was.
    1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. Wow! That really stands out with finish and hardware applied. Very nice! See, it really was worth all the worry, wasn't it?
    1 point
  25. I have one. I use it occasionally for thin rips. It came in a pile of accessories when I bought out a shop, so I can't say id pay full price but it seems to work well.
    1 point
  26. Then you have a future in this marriage business.
    1 point
  27. The bridle rattles a tiny bit. Which is why I thought maybe I could squeeze the "forks" of the leg together enough to make contact. This joint is the fulcrum a lot of force so I think it needs to be as strong as I can possibly make it. I agree that the gap is cosmetic, and it's in a pretty hidden place. I may end up just ignoring it.
    1 point
  28. Haha! my sentiments exactly. A local shop built a huge conference room table out of 2 beautiful book matched live edge slabs. There was a huge amount of epoxy filling the gaps & edges. It was for a local Cadillac dealership. I was in there & had a look at it. After about a year it already looked like s***t. Just enough minor wear to make the epoxy look really crappy.
    1 point
  29. The main purpose of the Gripper is to aid preventing kick back. If I need to cut a single 1/4" strip, I cut it on the left side of the blade. But if I need say 10 strips, I cut them on the right side and use a couple of grippers.
    1 point
  30. As with most bits of safety gear, the Grrripper will only protect you to the extent that you are willing to use it properly. In my workflow, repeated cuts are few and far between, so I feel I would fail to bother adjusting the device to properly fit every cut I make. In that case, it would not be very useful. However, some folks love them.
    1 point
  31. Commercial / Industrial storage racks show up on CL regularly in my area. I like the curtain or rolling door that hangs from the ceiling, that leaves the shelving open and free for odd parts, but hidden. Think I'd choose barn door over curtains, though.
    1 point