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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/11/20 in all areas

  1. Aftermarket tool not available. John Deere wanted $552 to specially make a no longer in stock tool. It's so simple, I just decided to make one out of wood on the lathe. This might be the only 200 year old Heart Pine clutch installation alignment tool for a John Deere 2640 w/reverser. I'm keeping it wrapped tightly in plastic untll the right clutch disk gets here, supposedly on Saturday. It fits so tightly, that I don't want the wood to move any. If it swells, I'll have to put it in the oven. It seemed to be the most stable piece of wood I had near the lathe. It just holds the c
    3 points
  2. Yes, just set up last weekend. Got the electric run on sat morning while I was at work, came home and pulled everything out of the garage and organized, threw away what was junk. Got all the cast iron clean since it was sitting for about 7 years. Gotta do some tuning up, then start a project to knock the cobwebs off.
    3 points
  3. Brad nails. Anyone that low to the floor to see them has had too much to drink to see them anyway!
    3 points
  4. I have the Grizzly slider on my saw. Except for the fence, it is identical to the SS. I use it for panels and ply and really like it. As @Mick S said it does not have positive stops, but they are not necessary and in my opinion would not work any way. The majority of time the fence is removed from the saw and the fence has to be squared to the blade every time it is attached. I made a 25"x25" square that I use when I install the fence. It takes about 1 minute to square the fence to the table saw fence and it is ready to cut. The unit is not saw specific, I had to drill the to attach th
    3 points
  5. We're finally at the point where I'm applying the mineral oil and Beeswax finish. Got the cutting board laser engraved yesterday and have now put three good coats of mineral oil and let that soak in and am now applying a good, heavy coat of Beeswax with mineral oil (my mixture). I'll let the Beeswax set for about 4 hours and then wipe off as much as I can, flip it and do the other side. I'll continue wiping it down until it can go a few hours without seeing any wet spots. This part could take a couple of days. In the Epilog laser right after engraving (you can go to my Instagram
    3 points
  6. First, red oak is fine to work with, so long as you like the appearance of the coarse grain. It is quite strong, and works with relative ease. It also takes stains extremely will, if the natural color doesn't suit you. Bed joints take a lot of abuse, and of course, must be able to break down to move through a doorway. I would consider the decision to abandon commercial hardware very carefully, as cut joints will be difficult to make as strong. If your design allowed for 'tusk' tenons with wedges, that would be my first suggestion. Since that requires parts to protrude awkwardly into shin-
    2 points
  7. I think you would want to use a glued M&T joint for the head and foot rails, and use the bed bolts only for the side rails - so there's just one bolt through each post. The bolt would pass through the tenon of the head/foot rail, but that shouldn't be a problem.
    1 point
  8. Three coats of mineral oil with the last being a mineral oil/Beeswax mix. I let that set for about 6 hours and then buff it with paper towels to get the excess Beeswax off. The cutting board is left with a rich luster sheen that is velvety smooth. Working side - Show side - David
    1 point
  9. Just what @Chestnutsaid. I've never had anything but bad results trying to apply multiple coats of stain, especially gel stain. Dye is much easier to regulate than stain is and it doesn't mask the grain like stain can. Multiple coats of stain can cause finish adherence problems as well. Oak takes stain better than just about any other wood, so a pre-stain conditioner is not needed
    1 point
  10. Test post from iPhone. Text added via ‘edit’ from the hamburger menu (three dots).
    1 point
  11. I'm in the bayside waters behind Long Beach Island NJ. The official name of the body of water is Little Egg Harbor.
    1 point
  12. We had to update to the latest software today. Looks like they made a lot of changes, even to the Admin area. When the dust settles, let me know if things are broken or missing and I’ll see if there are new settings I need to mess with to get the functionality back to normal.
    1 point
  13. Glue? Little bit in the middle and clamp it down. Violates movement technically but if you just glue a little bit with narrow material it's unlikely to be an issue. The slats look narrower than some tenons I've cut.
    1 point
  14. Tom, I'm surprised at you. You seem like such a nice guy, but you stole $552. from John Deere, you should be dancing!
    1 point
  15. The only one I've looked at closely is the smaller of the two that Sawstop offers.* It's had mixed reviews, but I think that most of the downside comments applied to the early versions that did not have positive stops for 90, 45, etc. The current versions do and the reviews seem to be more positive. Not much help, but that's about all I know about them. *Not true - we have a big 50" crosscut Excalibur on one of the SawStops at school. Nobody uses it because it won't hold a setting. Keep in mind though that it's in a school shop.
    1 point
  16. The cutting board has progressed through the stages but I forgot to post anything about it - oops! I cut the outer perimeter down to 1" on the CNC (I don't have a bit long enough to cut through 2" of material). Then used the bandsaw and tablesaw to cut the excess pieces off. Then I used my router table to flush trim the sides - My drum sander is wide enough to handle this board but the juice groove was causing issues because the pressure rollers tried to dip down when that went through, so I carried the board to my friend's cabinet shop and it took all of about 6 passe
    1 point