Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/25/20 in all areas

  1. ABC News did a piece on the need for students desks and chairs (Marc's design) for use at home during the Covid school closures. A woodworker here in Santa Fe , David Gunter saw it and took on himself to start making them. The local media got hold of it and it's mushrooming. The Fine Woodworking program at Santa Fe Community College where I teach has become involved and will be contributing dozens if not more desks and chairs. ABC News will be doing a human interest spotlight on it tonight. This is a terrific cause if anyone else wants to get involved on a local basis. Here's a link
    7 points
  2. Dang, I bet that was some frantic digging too! Seems like you got out mostly unscathed except I'm sure the bill from the plumber. Just got back from picking up a decent chunk of wood from a local guy who was clearing out his shop. No real plans for it, but for $50 the 14 board feet of semi-curly soft maple was a deal. With the rest of the curly maple, some walnut and cherry thrown in I think I made out okay. I guess some boxes or picture frames are in my future with some of the 18" long curly maple pieces.
    3 points
  3. State of my house this morning - Foundation repairs under way. Of course, the main water line is between 2 of the holes, and we heard water running about 15 minutes after the crew left. So I spent the next 4 hours digging this out: The plumber had to install the offset because of how much tension was on the line from movement when they started jacking up the house. I hated to call a plumber for a simple pipe joint, but no DIY plumbing job I have ever attempted has gone well, and the local hardware store was closing, anyway.
    3 points
  4. It sounds like I need to talk to Fuji. The only thing I can think of changing now is going to a bigger tip, even though the chart included with the sprayer says to use a 1.0 or a 1.3. That will have to wait now because my paint supplier offered to let me have one of his reconditioned spray systems, make sure it is working for us, and not have to pay for 12 months. It's a $3000 (new) system for $1200. The gun alone costs $800. Merkur 15. It's working great so far.
    3 points
  5. Back on topic, I don't know how I forgot to include this but our HOA runs a woodshop. In non-covid times I can go pay $16 or $20 and get access to a fully stocked woodworking shop complete with almost anything you could need. They even run classes there you can register for.
    2 points
  6. I used contact cement to lay a piece of leather, smooth side down on a scrap of some kind of wood, then used green compound on the rough side. It does a great job.
    2 points
  7. +1 To stropping. I find that MDF scraps with green (aluminum oxide?) compound are great for this. HF sells the compound pretty cheap.
    2 points
  8. That's been a nice side effect of the pandemic. I was able to get 6 coats of finish done over the last 2 days since I'm working from home. If not it would have taken me 3-5 days to get it done. I forgot to say in my first post, congrats on the kids! Hope you're all adjusting well and everyone is staying healthy!
    2 points
  9. It's got me concerned, but I appreciate the confidence. Nothing worse than a mind reader. Aw Dave, you know I don't do journals. I'm not ashamed of my mistakes, I just don't like stopping to take pics while I get my head around what I'm doing. For some reason or another, I think a new house is not a cheap as the Alder plywood I've had in the shop for a few years. And the table is going right back where it used to sit, since I already have the DC set up there for it.
    2 points
  10. Sharp blade, shallow cut, tight mouth. Biggest hurdle is watching grain direction. If there is any swirl at all, the direction will switch on you and allow tear out. And unless you have a premium FAS straight grained stock, oak will have swirl. Go slow and switch to a scraper for troublesome spots.
    2 points
  11. I have this idea of getting rid of the mobile base that my router table sits on. It has 2 fixed castors and 2 swivel castors. And, the fixed ones make it difficult to pull it straight away from the wall. So I bought these. And now [A little late in my planning}, I realized that they won't work on the router tables base. So, I guess the base has to join the mobile base and disappear as well. That leaves me with just a top. Obviously that means another solution. So, I guess I have no other choice but to build a router table. This is going to take some planning. Hope I can.
    2 points
  12. Use two 22.5 degree elbows with about a 3 or 4 inch piece of pipe between them, this will give you a nice sweep to your turn.
    1 point
  13. First rainy day in a long time here, so I couldn't find anything better to do than to go back to work on the rental house floor. It's a bad job by myself, but looks like that's the way it will be for a while. Every piece requires getting up and down off the floor more than once. I got the hall finished, and am going into the big living room. I have the two bedrooms at the end of the hall done, and their big walk-in closets. Still have the other two bedrooms to do, off either side of the hall. I had been dreading the angled meeting of the slate floor in the entryway, but it went right
    1 point
  14. If you do need to bend it yourself with a heat gun, be prepared for a challenge. Pipe of that diameter & thin wall will want to kink in the worst way. If you have no forms or bending springs, then packing it with sand & capping the ends will keep it from collapsing. Go real easy with the heat so you don't scorch it or melt through it.
    1 point
  15. Yeah, I'm glad today's crew is led by Juan. I got to familiar with Manuel yesterday. Manuel Labor, that is... Between removing gravel from the flowerbeds and digging out that pipe, I think I shoveled close to 5 tons of material.
    1 point
  16. I can't speak to Ross's soil, but here in Middle Tennessee, we have clay for soil. In lower valley's the soil looks great, but in the flatter areas, ..clay. 75% of the private homes that were built here before the 1990's were clay brick, and still standing. There are older neighborhoods with nothing but brick homes. In order to get a good garden space, $$$$$$ for compost, manure anything that will build soil. I use all that plus Sheet composting. Which is a 6", 8" or 10" layer of leaves spread over your garden space in the Fall when the leaves fall and let Ma Nature break them down
    1 point
  17. Reading oak grain can be difficult as the prominent cathedral grain that the wood is known for isn't always the real grain direction. If it starts to tear switch directions. For smoothing operations it's common for me to attack a board in multiple directions to prevent tear out. I handle the transitions spots with a card scraper. I don't encourage micro bevels but keep in mind you don't need to sharpen and polish the entire bevel especially with bevel down planes. Another thing I do is strop. you can get some stropping compound and use leather or even a board. This will give a razor sharp
    1 point
  18. All that will be helpful. Two other points to add, Often a slight angle with the plane will allow you to "slice" the wood as opposed to hitting it head on. The other is, relieve the corners of your blades a tiny bit, so the corners don't dig in and leave you with tracks that you'll go crazy trying to remove. And don't forget, grain direction is highly important, don't get artistic, just keep the grain all going in one single direction. One more thing. The cost of your planes is unimportant. What's important is your learned skill in using what you have. Sharp blades, proper mouth openi
    1 point
  19. Just make sure you have enough room for the new router table or you may end up buying a new house
    1 point
  20. I don't have it glued yet. I'm still just doing some prep work to make sure the red oak I got was flat on bottom. I also have some pretty cheap planes (Amazon Basics and a Kobalt) but I will take some pics and let you all tell me if I have the mouth set right. I spent a long time yesterday flattening one of my chip breakers and I'll spend some more time today sharpening.
    1 point
  21. Red oak with its splintery grain can definitely be a challenge to plane even with a sharp plane. When you glued your top up did you make sure the grain was all going the same direction?
    1 point
  22. Rick, Rick, Rick, what’s the problem? You and we know you can do it so get started and let us in on the build
    1 point
  23. @RichardA, just admit it - you really wanted a new router table, anyway.
    1 point
  24. 1 point
  25. In thinking about it If i thinned out everything a bit proportionally i could probably get away with 2" thick legs. The other thought I had after I posed was to make the legs with a strip of cherry running down the middle and 2 skins of walnut on either side. I could make it thin to appear like an inlay or something.
    1 point
  26. Totally missed this thread until just now. Wow, what a great build. Kudos to your hand tool skills! When I first saw the plans for this I assumed they were in inches. What a relief to see that they were in cm. Big difference! Put a slab door on top of it and start using it until you can get back to it!
    1 point
  27. I don't see how the weight has much of an influence on the performance of joinery? I've made a large dresser as well and used all floating mortise and tenon joinery and it is more than strong enough. A lot of this depends on construction method and design. If you were planning on making a modern style where there aren't dust frames and the drawers are attached with ball bearing drawer slides. Making the box with a plywood back that is attached with screws like Richard's would be very strong. Dowels where the top and bottom meets the side would offer a lot of strength. My Roubo style
    1 point
  28. I contacted (emailed) fuji for some information on a paint product I wanted to spray. I attached the tech sheet for the product and asked my questions. I did take them about a day to get back but it was good information when they did.
    1 point
  29. As if this project has not been progressing slow enough already, I need to put it on hold to do some other stuff for the house. BUT, at least it almost actually looks like a table now!
    1 point