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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/16/20 in all areas

  1. Since a lot of this is what I do in my day job, I thought I'd toss it out there for you guys. I'm sure most of you guys know this stuff already but, hoping someone gets something from it.. Respiratory Protection – Breaking Down What You Need in the Shop The woodworking hobby is a very dusty hobby that requires respiratory protection. The hobby also has the woodworker in contact with many other chemicals and substances that also requires respiratory protection. Unfortunately, not all respiratory protection is the same and there’s not a lot of information in the community to help th
    6 points
  2. A quick followup from the original build. I said I was following up the first 2 chairs made in cherry by making 2 in walnut, well here they are. These walnut chairs went very smoothly as I had developed all my patterns and angles in the previous version. Made a few subtle changes; the back spindles are a little more slender, widened the back lower support, and I did a little more sculpting on the chair trying to soften the look slightly. Today is the day I brought them to my upholstery guy, took a few pics before loading them into the truck. Here are the 2 chairs preupholstery;
    5 points
  3. I have been spending last week working on some Christmas projects for my daughter (and to sell). Both projects are first time projects for me. Having a new (& accurate) bandsaw and planer have really opened up my options for things I can make. First project: I made some 12" & 15" stick shuttles for her weaving loom. These are made from a scrap piece of 3/4" beech I had from a previous project that I re-sawed and planed to 1/4" thick. They are finished with aniline dye, sanding sealer and Watco Satin Wax. Second project: I made her a 1.25"X13"X18" edge grain cutting
    4 points
  4. You embarrass me, with the quanity of your work. I've had a router table build on my bench for over a month, and it's still sitting there. You on the other hand knock out beautiful chairs as though you were an assembly line. Well done my friend, well done.
    3 points
  5. I use supplied air every chance I get. I don't use it if just running a few pieces through the table saw, which has great DC, but will use it if I'm running a long run. I use it for spraying anything, or even when cutting masonry with the wet diamond saw. I don't use it when cutting tile with the wet tile saw. I don't do much sanding of wood, but when any is done, the hood goes on-same for sanding fiberglass, sheetrock mud, or body filler. In hot weather, my air supply is a 120v air conditioner. Every other time is a Bullard air pump. The Bullard heats the air up, much like an H
    3 points
  6. +1 To all of this. In my day job, I am often working in areas where a respirator is required by OSHA. The irritant smoke qualitative fit test is used, and is pretty effective. I guarantee you won't pass it with a beard. Do not think that a poorly fit respirator is helping you. Most likely, it is worse, because you THINK it is helping, and perhaps spend more time exposed than you would otherwise. I've seen a bunch of folks drop big $$$ on a Sawstop, because it is 'Safer'. How many of us put that same effort into simple eye, ear, and lung protection? I know I haven't. And I can tell i
    3 points
  7. I found out years ago on the golf course that only perfect practice makes perfect. Kind of like trying to get good credit without any credit. I gave my clubs to a more deserving person.
    3 points
  8. I think Mike's is in a tough spot, but also a spot that has some positives. He still has the name and the "client base" given to him by Sam, but at the same time he's not Sam. I think just doing Sam's designs means he'll never command the prices or the amount of business Sam got. But if he builds off the brand with new and interesting pieces, he might have more success. Randall, does Mike do any new designs that you know of? Sam has big shoes to fill, sort of like becoming the new SS for Baltimore after Ripken retired.
    2 points
  9. Actually got some snow here outside DC. First time our kids have been old enough to experience enough snow to really play in and go sledding. We may not have returned to virtual school after the morning break...
    2 points
  10. I like these, as with all your projects they came out great. I see you embraced the sapwood, well done.
    2 points
  11. Obviously, there are certain bits that I borrowed from OSHA or some form of a dictionary but, the work is mine. You are certainly correct about the PAPRs but, I didn't go a great deal into depth on them because they are pretty cost prohibitive. They also make one that fits under a welding hood that's commonly referred to as a "yoke" in the industry but, it's not really relevant for the woodworker. Proper fitting PPE is always a struggle because one size does not fit all! Even though the refineries I work in all provide PPE free of cost, I typically purchase my own (except respirato
    2 points
  12. Thanks for noticing that, I really like the look of walnut with the sapwood. Most of the sapwood will be hidden by the cushions, so I didn't really worry about it while I was building, then I got them done and thought that looks really cool. I could have done a little better at chosing the location of some of the sapwood, I think it looks a little haphazardly placed. But in the end I'm still pleased. My stock was less than primo walnut, but I agree we should not be afraid to celebrate and embrace walnut's alter ego.
    1 point
  13. So what I’ve done to address the issue, is run the tracksaw down the center, splitting the two seams of the table when it’s closed. This is definitely the solution to the problem. But this actually showed what the real issue was all along that I was unaware of. My Makita track saw needs to be adjusted. It is not cutting perfectly at 90°, and it is also wobbling left to right. The wobble is either due to the blade not being tightened up or not being secured correctly on the track. So I’m gonna have to do some minor adjustments to figure this out. The combination of an acute angle and
    1 point
  14. I love the addition of sapwood in the chosen areas as well. I think it's time to celebrate all of the walnut wood not just the chocolaty center. This is giving me good inspiration to get back in the shop and making things. I can't wait to get back to work on some of my projects that got interrupted because of unforeseen surprises.
    1 point
  15. I cant help you there. But, I do know, that copies, even exact copies are still copies and will never reach the value of the original.
    1 point
  16. I drove to Cali once. I was impressed by a forest of whirly top trees. Some had three leaves and some four, but the leaves spun around in a big circle. Those trees were super thick on some hills.
    1 point
  17. Thanks bud! I know I've gotten better about using PPE in the shop as I've gotten older.
    1 point
  18. I'm not sure what you mean by offset gap, but you would be essentially scribing the extension to match whatever is there when it's expanded. As long as you only make the adjustment to the extension then you aren't going to alter anything about how it meets up without the extension. I would say run the track saw through the gap with it closed first and then see what that does to how the extension fits. Maybe you won't even have to do anything to it.
    1 point
  19. The ones that get their nutrition from Lake Mead?
    1 point
  20. What about all those creosote trees? You know, the funny ones with just two branches, that grow in straight rows, and are all tied together at the top?
    1 point
  21. Wow! Great review Kev. Thanks for sharing.
    1 point
  22. Wait.... What are "woods"? That is something I love about the Eastern part of the US. We have conifer forests in some areas, and the Northeast has forests, but So. Cal basically has desert. And for lumber, you basically have to buy it. Only urban lumber here and not much of that.
    1 point
  23. I would love to live somewhere where the state colors weren't light brown, medium brown and dark brown, but everywhere that is green is also really humid and hit during the summer. I guess you can't have everything.
    1 point
  24. Coop, the saw blade in use is a Stark 305mm (12") combination blade. I also have a dedicated rip and crosscut in Leuco blades. These are not terribly expensive blades ... a little above average in cost. There should be NO burning. The quality of cut could be put down to 40% blade and 60% slider/parallel guide. The slider keeps the work piece from moving. even a little, and the result is as flat as off a jointer. This is a glue line rip, as demonstrated above. Another way to do this, on a conventional cabinet saw, is to use the JessEm guides, which force the workpiece to hug the fenc
    1 point