Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/12/21 in all areas

  1. When I saw the picture above I was hoping the sapwood would play a roll in the project. Often people are too quick to eliminate sapwood.
    5 points
  2. As with most stories you hope for a good ending. Well I haven't reached the end of this story yet so my hope is that I will get to a good ending, but there is a distinct possibility it could go bad. I'll start this story back in Dec 2017, I met this tree, a funky walnut at the family farm. As most of you know I mill most of my own lumber and hauling around a chainsaw mill is my main milling technique. I'm pretty adventurous in what I'll mill. Sometimes doing that means a fabulous board and sometimes that means more firewood. I air dry all the wood I mill, and I like to mill thick, this gi
    4 points
  3. I just finished this shelf for our tile guy. The outside first cut from a walnut log and the sapwood is certainly an accent. Actually more than the pic shows. If it’s unclear, the first pic is of the shelf in it’s to be , mounted position and the second is the underside of the shelf, the outside of the log.
    3 points
  4. That’s going to be sweet. I’m like Chet, I think more so than not, that sapwood has it’s place.
    3 points
  5. Well i can still move a camera with an injured wrist, so i've been spending more time outside. We had some awesome frosty days. While out exploring my cousin and I came accross some deer that were eating on a fallen oak tree. This is un-cropped and was taken with a 100mm lens on full frame. I was at best 20 feet from this deer and it didn't care at all that I was there. Below was cropped slightly. Normally i have to use a 400mm to get pictures like this....
    2 points
  6. "I foolishly have way too may projects going on. " Even if you're in second place, you're still a Long ways back.
    2 points
  7. I foolishly have way too may projects going on. I went downstairs last night to try and finish one up. Making some playing card holders for kids and I cut one of the 4 wrong. Kept thinking about History of The World. At least there's one less to sand!
    2 points
  8. He’s a cool dude. Perhaps being his IT guy during my post retirement days would be a neat gig?
    2 points
  9. Wood porn! I am building a walnut bathroom. Only one door and 10 drawers. The door will have this curly claro walnut, book matched panels. I will post the work when I get further along. This kind of wood makes me giddy.
    2 points
  10. Someone recently asked to see how I produce plates & dishes without a lathe. First let me warn everyone, I am experimenting with different jig designs, and what you see here may not be the safest way to do things. Please bear with me... I like working with tree rounds from a local timber mill. The end grain looks pretty nice. Maple is my favorite so far. Here is a log round, broken up to make 2 round dishes about 8" diameter each, and an oblong chunk for carving. I tried to round off a blank with my pivot-point circle jig, but the thick maple and smallish diameter made it f
    1 point
  11. I think walnut sapwood looks a lot better when it isn't steamed. It also has to be done in a harmonious way. I'm interested in how this one will turn out. More often than not when i get figured wood like this that might misbehave I'm inclined to make shop veneer and mount it on a panel, or drawer front.
    1 point
  12. He really had a "ten pounds of...stuff in a five pound bag" kind of approach to his last shop. It was a daylight basement packed to the gills with tools. My recollection is that he'd have had to completely redo his shop layout to get a better DC run and that wasn't sufficiently important to him to warrant the effort.
    1 point
  13. I like a good ending, especially when the good guys win.
    1 point
  14. All of that is confusing. I'd make an oversized leg strait and perpendicular to the arm and floor and cut tapers into each face to create the splay angle. This will keep your tenon and mortise perpendicular. Because the taper angle isn't very severe you could also then make the mortise for the side rail on the leg perpendicular so the side rail to front leg joinery would be a LOT more simple to create. Creating the leg this way is very similar to how the guild build covers the side rail creation. It's also how most dinig chair legs are created. Make a big block and cut the leg out of the larg
    1 point
  15. So, I've been woodworking for just about 2 years now. I built myself a shop in my basement that I've managed to outfit pretty well. I'm American, but I live in Germany, so I don't have access to many of the accoutrements of the US-woodworking lifestyle (read: no dado blades, etc.). So far, I've built a snazzy desk based on a video by Canadian Woodworks that turned out great. I built myself a Roubo-Bench based on Marc's awesome course. I decided to put endcaps on both ends with dovetails. I was even lucky enough to go to LA for a week with my father and do a class with William Ng. I'm really en
    1 point
  16. The direction of spin is the same for both impellers. You can't look at an impeller (at least I can't) and determine that it's supposed to spin this way or that, though I'm sure someone who's knowledgeable on impeller design could. Some have the blades inclined in one direction, some in the other. It all depends on the design intent for the blower. My Oneida impeller is similar to the WEN (but cast aluminum, not steel) and spins the same direction.
    1 point
  17. Here are a few dimension drawings from Fusion360, one of the front leg and one overview of the chair. Looking at the way the tenon was planned, I was concerned that parts of it could chip off. The tenon was designed to pass through the arm perpendicularly, which required the tenon to not follow the direction of the grain. The leg leans backward by a few degrees, so in order for the tenon to pass perpendicularly through the horizonal arm, the tenon needed to exit the top of the leg at an angle from the wood fibers. That would leave a bit of it unsupported at the top because of the lean. Be
    1 point
  18. The stubbier cyclones don't separate as well as taller ones, which may be part of the issue. Another thing is to keep the air velocity high. If using a machine with a small port, opening another blast gate to allow more air to flow will help with separation. Check for leakage below the cyclone. That will allow more spoil to get sucked up into the filter.
    1 point
  19. The angle & curve of the lower impeller will give high volume, but at lower static pressure. The configuration of the larger one will maintain the volume much better as the static pressure rises. It will handle longer duct runs & a cyclone much better than the stock impeller. I would put an ammeter on that motor though because it will be a lot easier to overload it with the larger impeller. They are not expensive.
    1 point
  20. There are some good takes on the collector on Matt Cremona's videos that cover the unit. There may be good improvements elsewhere I just haven't seen them. I believe they will cover your question quite well.
    1 point
  21. I think @Chestnut has had a transfusion of ethylene-glycol.
    1 point
  22. I've used these for an L shaped trestle style desk i made for Megan. https://www.rockler.com/align-n-lock Though i used them in conjunction with some dowels or floating tenons that were not glued. The other options mentioned above work really well also.
    1 point
  23. Very true. In fact you usually want to cut any joinery in your parts before you cut the parts to shape.
    1 point
  24. With some help I challenged my "between shops" mentality and brought my old zipcode saw up from dad's. He has an old jointer and a DW735 that need some attention. With a little effort I may have a fairly functional 120v shop while I wait to break ground.
    1 point
  25. I did a test where I glued up 3" of solid maple, cherry, baltic birch, and MDF and measured it with calipers in summer and winter. The MDF changed the most, followed by the baltic birch.
    1 point
  26. Sunset in early December over Lake Superior.
    1 point
  27. Undersized bits for plywood may or may not work as the dimensions of ply vary even when specified. I use a jig that is set using the material that is to fit in the slot. A router bit smaller than the end dimension allows a more exact fit. I use a 3/4" bit as it meets 99% of my needs. Shopnotes and others have variation on this setup. I use a jig guided by a template collar as opposed to the side of the router. This has given me the best result. I think this is version 3(?). The material is clamped between the long guides to set the width. The zero edge of the guide is se
    1 point