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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/26/21 in all areas

  1. I very recently finished the cabinet ive been working on that will hold all my stereo equipment and cds/vinyls. I had a thread open in the general woodworking sub about visible glue lines in a table top i was gluing together. The top was for this cabinet. Im happy to report I got the top glued together and there are only very minor areas where the joint is visible. I wrapped an LED strip around the inside of the case at the back to add some lighting to it and it really makes it pop. The case is regular Baltic Birch plywood that I ebonized using calligraphy ink. It worked great, but was alot of work. Id have been better off painting the panels. But it was worth a try and would use the ink again (and will on my next project im making for a friend). I topcoated the panels and the cherry with a couple coats of dewaxed shellac, then some spray lacquer. Thanks for checking it out! P.S. loading pictures is so easy now!
    7 points
  2. DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT attempt any but the smallest, simplest glue up with 5 minute epoxy. 5 minutes is about all you get but if mixed in larger batches, the stuff can go off in only a couple of minutes. You're welcome.
    3 points
  3. I think you're the best one to make that determination. Here's what i would recommend: Once the leg pieces are milled and prepped for assembly, practice the glue up dry two or three times so that you can get the hang of it. Then use mineral spirits in the place of the epoxy, applying it just as you would the epoxy and time the whole process. Once you're comfortable that it will take 8 minutes or 14 minutes or whatever, add about 5 minutes to that to give you the actual glue up time. Epoxy is slickery stuff and your pieces may want to creep on you, so be prepared for that in your practice runs.
    3 points
  4. I wanted to add a link. In looking up the link, I realized I've used this stuff so much, I confuse myself. Thixo is the Jamestown Distributors house product (sold as "Totalboat"). https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/product/product-detail/64347 The WEST system stuff is called SIXten. Same idea (also on the Jamestown site). SystemThree calls their's "Gel Magic". https://www.systemthree.com/products/silvertip-gelmagic-non-sagging-epoxy-adhesive Any of the above will do what you need it to do. I just glanced at the specs for SystemThree, because I had the page open. Minimum cure temp is 50 degrees, gel time at 77 degrees is 30 minutes, and tack free at 77 degrees is 3 hours. Because it's not sitting in the cup, the exothermic reaction is not working against you. Also, you're only mixing that one thing you're working on... If you really want to take the time, you can put the glue on half the joint, clamp it all together, wait for the cure, then take it apart and glue up the remaining side. Twice as much work, but you'll get comfortable with the epoxy. Once you understand the Chemistry, you can get really creative with the stuff. It really is better life through chemistry.
    2 points
  5. I've used a lot of epoxy. Here's what I can tell you. WEST is very flexible, because you can use different hardeners, and you can add the appropriate thickeners. It's a little expensive, but you're paying for their R&D, and their customer service. By the way, by "flexible", I don't mean the epoxy itself flexes, I mean you can adapt it to different uses: Colloidal silica for strength, micro balloons for fairing, etc. I like System Three. System Three has their "SilverTip" epoxies, which are pre-loaded with colloidal silica, so you don't have to add it. I was going to add: "Whatever you do, remember that epoxy is exothermic. That is, it makes its own heat as it cures. What this means in practice is that you don't want to mix it in a styrofoam cup, it will cure even faster, perhaps even melting the cup. You can slow down the reaction by mixing it in a flat pan... spreading it out keeps the heat from "consolidating", speeding its own cure." Then I got to thinking about what you're using it for, and how you need to clamp things together once you've applied the epoxy. If I were in your shoes, I'd use Thixo (WEST), or System Three's equivalent, or even score the equivalent from Jamestown Distributors. These are basically a mix that comes in a caulking tube, with mixing tubes on the end so that you simply lay a bead down, and you have plenty of time to clamp up. Let the mix harden in the mixing tube, toss it, and then screw on a new tube the next time you need some. For the amount you're gluing, you'll have some from one tube left over. Also, remember, contact pressure is enough, you don't need to clamp too tightly. I'd consider taping the joints, adding the epoxy, then "rolling" the legs together and clamping. Should work. People glue 40 foot birds mouth masts together with this stuff, yours should be easy in comparison. Oh, and do a search for an eBook by Russell Brown. Everything you ever wanted to know about working with epoxy, but were afraid to ask. But for this job, I'd use Thixo.
    2 points
  6. My knee-jerk reaction is that the glue is telegraphing through. This is something one always has to take into account when veneering. Refinishing veneer is fraught with greater peril as the strippers and / or abrasives can take the exposed surface even closer to the adhesive. You will see a lot of mass produced or "cheap" veneered products carry a very heavy pigmented stain job. Take a look at things like "cherry finish" on cabinets in your local BORG. These finishes look more like paint than stain to me and solve the telegraphing problem through sheer density of coverage. Here's an example of how to hide almost anything and call it "cherry".
    2 points
  7. Perfect execution of the style all around @Bmac and beautiful work, you really did that slab justice!
    2 points
  8. Hi folks - I am building a Stickley-inspired entry bench for some family friends. I have not finished tuning the joinery for my quadralinear legs, but I anticipate some minor gaps here and there. Epoxy was already in my plans for gluing up the legs, and I think I have enough J-B Weld ClearWeld Pro on hand to glue the legs and their cores together. However, I worry that the 5 min set time on the material I have could be unforgiving. I could let me shop get colder than 40 degrees F and that could give me a little more (and less pleasant) working time. All of this is to say I believe I should spend the money to get a quart or two of one of the commonly available two part epoxies. If anyone has a recommendation for/against a specific product I would love to hear it. I am currently looking at buying System 3 resin and their #2 (medium/30 min pot life/55 degree application temp) hardener. Their #1 can handle temps as low as 35 deg F but only has a 15 minute pot life. The #3 requires 75 degrees(!) but has an hour long pot life. I know so little about these adhesives that I don't know where to start to compare System 3 to West Systems or the other ones. Thanks for any advice anyone can give. p.s Here are some snapshots from Bob Lang's Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture in which I found the joinery technique I'm using for the legs. My leg pieces are a hair shy of 2 inches wide so this technique has made for some exciting work with pushblocks.
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. Welcome @bpbpbp! Some pictures would help, but my guess is that you are seeing areas where the veneer glue has penetrated up into the top layer. That fills the space between wood fibers and keeps the pigment out. If that is the case, something with pigment that stays on the surface, like gel stain, tinted clear coat, or outright paint, is about your only recourse.
    1 point
  11. Very nice work, that came out looking pretty good. Looks like all your tribulations with the top was worth it.
    1 point
  12. Thank you! No, no trouble at all. The ink dries quite fast I found, and once it did, only a little dry dust would wipe off. Quick wipe with a paper towel to pick that up, and once a clear coat is on it, its sealed. I would recommend it to anyone wanting to try it out. Its dangerous when applying it though. Any drips will permanently stain anything it gets on. Including your fingers, it stays with you a few days. Heres a link to the ink i used. Amazon.com: Japanese Sumi Ink Chinese Brush Calligraphy Ink Painting Drawing Works India Ink Made in Japan, Black: Office Products Thanks Coop, mostly classic rock. The Beatles, Queen, Fleetwood Mac, Boston to name just a few. I have a few new vinyls, not really into that much anymore, theyre expensive (and frankly, not as cool as original pressings). Thanks treeslayer, yes ive added LED strips to other things around my house, im quite into it.
    1 point
  13. Great job @woodbutcher really like the lights, hope to do something similar this summer my old turntable has had a long enough rest
    1 point
  14. That is Fine! I can’t imagine paint looking anywhere near as good. Well worth your troubles and easy for me to say! WB, what genre vinyls do you collect?
    1 point
  15. I have used West System for several years with no complaints. With having no severe temp constraints in Houston, I would guess working time to be 20 minutes or so. That could probably be extended but I tend to get a pucker when it starts to thicken, although adjustable.
    1 point
  16. Nice work, @woodbutcher! Did you have trouble with the ink rubbing off onto anything that happened to be near? I tried that once, and found it to be a terrible mess. Sure looks good, once it is top-coated, though.
    1 point
  17. It was pre-glued and glued along the edge of the tabletop
    1 point
  18. Good for all of you that have the vaccine available to you and are taking it. I think it's a great opportunity and may offer some sense of security. I'll get it as soon as I can but I'm going to be in the 2nd to last group of people. I'll probably only get it before unemployed 20 somethings. There is just no way to go back to a normal way of life without doing something like a vaccine. If there was another way I'm sure society would be considering it. Here the news is saying sit and wait if you are in the system they will contact you. Each state is handling the roll out differently.
    1 point
  19. Dry fitted. Now in the clamps. Dry fitting is always important to me since I had a stressful but successful event on a door. Too much stress and not good risk reward. The people that I'm building this for wanted no profile on the edges around the panels. I put a cove on the bottom left edge for a finger grip. White markers are needed for my old eyes. Pencil marks may be hard to see on walnut. If the figured wood has a pattern that points, I always have it pointing up.
    1 point