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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/17/21 in all areas

  1. Drawer Bottom and Slips One of the least pleasurable areas of drawer making is fitting drawer bottoms. Why? Because there always seems more to do than anticipated - there are more panels to machine to thickness and area, and this feels like it is endless. Mindless. Before starting on the bottoms, the drawer fronts are planed, chipped dovetails repaired, and fine-tuning of the bottom-less drawer is completed ... Link to the fixture here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/DrawerPlaningFixture.html One of the rules I set for myself at the start of this project was that,
    5 points
  2. Perpetual motion results from giving Mt. Dew to a toddler. No mystery there.
    5 points
  3. I just got notification that my american chestnut trees have shipped! Thanks to @Chestnut for the post a while back about getting his, I immediately went and got on the waiting list to get some. Also coming this week is about 15 apple, peach, pear, cherry, persimmon, and olive trees. Still need to plant our 60ish berry bushes as well. It’s going to be a busy spring/summer.
    5 points
  4. That's awesome to hear! Of the 4 I planted i had 1 die. It got wiped out by Japanese beetles. They are apparently highly attracted to Chestnut trees. I treated the other 3 trees with a pesticide to keep them away. So keep your eye on them. I have a pretty healthy tree order coming this year. I'm trying to introduce some diversity on my lot. Right now all i have are Ash, Elm and Boxelder, 2 of which are highly disease prone. So i ordered a river birch, a pair of black cherry, a pair of eastern redbud, a red maple, and a sugar maple. We'll see which ones take off.
    4 points
  5. As many of you know my father passed away a week ago Monday and as we work through the process one of the things that came up was the need for an URN for his ashes. The family decided to go with a wooden box type urn. As the funeral home showed us what was available they either looked really cheap or the prices climbed to the $1K range. Knowing my father (who was quite cheap LOL) I offered to make the the box and thought I would take you all along for the ride. First up was the design we wanted something clean and fairly simple yet nice. I decided to go with what I had in the shop so originall
    3 points
  6. I'd try the Rambo approach: use your multitool to cut a slot, just wide enough to fit your machete. Then go batoning all the way down
    3 points
  7. As much as I try to understand electricity, I don’t. If I turn my valve off to my water hose, I still get a little water out of the nozzle when I open it. When I turn the propane tank valve off of my cooker, the flame lingers momentarily. When I unplug my drill motor, that’s it! Looks like there would still be a little in the power cord?
    2 points
  8. I decided to add a cabinet to my work bench. There are just too many tools on the wall, and many would be better off stored in drawers where I can reach for them when needed. Please feel free to post your underbench cabinets here. I do not recall a thread on this topic. The cabinet will span as wide and high as it can go without being impeded by either hold downs or the sliding deadman. The cabinet is deep - too deep for drawers. The plan is that the drawers will not be full length deep internally, but have full length sides through to the rear to create a
    1 point
  9. If you buy local from HD, Freud. From Lowes, get Bosch. Online, Whiteside. IMO.
    1 point
  10. AFAIK you can only use paste wax to buff your french polished piece and protect it a bit more. I don't think lacquer would stick properly since the shellac used for french polishing is not de-waxed. And even if it works, it doesn't make any sense to go through all the trouble of french polishing something just to apply lacquer on top.
    1 point
  11. I should have gotten what I think is called western red cedar, which has all the rot resistance properties for outdoor furniture. I ended up buying Eastern red cedar which has same properties of western except the outdoor resistance properties.
    1 point
  12. @Coop, there are some theoretical discussions of electrical current flow that may allow for what you described, but since the electromotive force 'pushes' electrons through a conductor at what is effectively the speed of light, you just can't detect it.
    1 point
  13. If 'aromatic red cedar' refers to the same juniper species that grows prolifically throughout the southeast, the heartwood is extremely insect and decay resistant, lasting for decades, even in direct ground contact and full exposure to the elements. The sapwood, not so much. This wood was commonly used for fence posts prior to steel T- posts becoming an affordable alternative. 'Split rail' fencing made from this species is still a common decorative application.
    1 point
  14. I took my son for his driving exam today, then whatched him drive home in my rearview mirror. His "new" car may be several years old, but you'd think it just rolled off the assembly line... Sorry, too dark for photos, this is a dealer pic.
    1 point
  15. I cut the veneer for the inside of the sides. It is fiddleback English Sycamore. I also taped it and got it ready for the press to find out that I don't have any lightener for the glue. I ordered some and it will arrive on Thursday. So, I shifted gears and started to veneer the shelves. I used the track saw because these are much longer cuts. Here is how I cut veneer with the track saw. I put the sheets on a sheet of mdf. Then tape all the veneer together so they don't move during the cut. This is the blade that I use to get nice clean cuts. Once the sheets are cu
    1 point
  16. Thanks All, I made a few inserts out of scrap today. You can really crank these things out if you gang them for operations. I'm hoping reconfiguration as needs change will be easy.
    1 point
  17. ok, so a quick and easy one page build, @Coop and @Bmac had asked how they were built so here goes. here's the pattern i use you can see about 11" long glue up the blanks and trace the side profile and cut on the band saw then trace and cut the top profile the rest is just a belt and disc sander after cutting some of the waste off on the bandsaw, over to the oscillating spindle sander then on to my ROS clamped in my vise upside down for final finishing, a little hand sanding to finer grits then a couple of coats of mineral oil and done, really easy and quick project that make g
    1 point
  18. It seems so straight forward: build the case, insert drawer frames and dividers, and build the drawers. Each step actually requires planning ahead. The devil lies is in the details. These are some of the details we take for granted ... Step one is to plane the fronts of the rails and dividers, and fill in any chips with tinted epoxy. Even gluing up requires a strategy when the case includes blind sliding dovetails: glue these first. The benefit of liquid hide glue is extended open time and repairability. I hope that I do not have to make any repairs, but I could do with the
    1 point
  19. The Rebate A rebate can be made with a handheld router, router table, table saw, a handsaw and chisel, and a hand plane such as a moving fillister. My preference is the latter. What can be more simple than a fillister plane along an edge? Well, the plane needs to be set up, especially when planing interlocked grain, as we have here. And before this can take place, the case needs to be prepared if the desired result is an accurate - flush and square - rebate. The first step is to level and square the front and back edges of the case. My plane of choice here is a small bevel up plane wi
    1 point