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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/08/21 in all areas

  1. What lies behind drawer #1? The underbench cabinet is done .... ... and now the drawers are being filled, starting with the centre drawer in the top row. There are 10 drawers in all, and the aim is to use the space as efficiently as possible. Into this cabinet will be those tools I want close at hand, and to access readily. The centre drawers in the top two rows are for marking tools. The top drawer will be for squares I use all the time. Opening the drawer produces a 300mm Starrett combination square, a 150mm Starrett double square, and a Veritas Sliding Square. these are french fitted into a Jarrah panel (more on the french fitting shortly). ... Now you know how I like secret drawers - well, if you slide this panel back ... ... you find the treasure drawer with a pair of Colen Clenton mitre squares infilled in Sheoak, and pair of Chris Vesper 4" and 7" squares infilled in Tasmanian Blackwood, and a 2x2" Bridge City saddle square ... The Jarrah panel for the latter squares is a loose fit, snug at the sides and about 5mm of expansion space at the end. At the right side of the photo are the rails, which were glued to the sides (but not the loose panel) Below is the upper panel for the Starretts and Veritas squares. The panel needed to be thin - it is 6mm thick - and cut outs made rather than french fitted. This was to save space by having the tools hanging down rather than sticking up. The eagle eyed will have noticed that the rear of the drawer was cut away. This was to allow for the upper tray to slide past the drawer back, which takes advantage of the space behind the drawer when it is opened. There was a little extra shaping as the body of the Veritas hung down lower than the other squares. The upper tray runs on the Jarrah rails attached to the inside of the drawer sides. Finally, there is a rail added above the tray to prevent it tipping as it is slid back. This is in the same Tasmanian Oak as the drawer sides. The drawer manages about 90% extension without any support. Regards from Perth Derek
    5 points
  2. First pic just shows the holes cut to accept 2" pipe nipples. Used with conduit lock nuts and insulating bushings this creates a pathway between boxes as per the NEC. One is for the feeds between service panels. The other is just in case I need pathway for who-knows-what years from now. The original plan was two ground rods at a set distance. We even drew it that way originally. Current code allows the use of a WWII era technology; a Ufer ground. This is a concrete encased electrode and this is what I went with.
    2 points
  3. More joints sealed and the second service panel added.
    2 points
  4. I never liked most glues for mdf. The medium tended to float and shift even while clamping it together. But this thick stuff sets up fast, the mdf doesn’t float away, and it doesn’t get sucked in like a sponge. A very suitable use for the thick stuff.
    1 point
  5. If you call them natural edge studs you can actually charge more for the house.
    1 point
  6. I think the ARBORTECH Turbo Plane may be what you're looking for.
    1 point
  7. I've never seen that stuff before. I built this coffered ceiling with MDF, and Powergrab-no other fasteners. Coffers are about 4x5 feet, were built in the shop, and put in place with two sheetrock lifts. I'll go to great lengths to avoid sheetrock.
    1 point
  8. https://www.manualslib.com/manual/596009/Craftsman-103-20660.html?page=6#manual This has the parts diagram and parts listing. You might have to dig around to find a current equivalent part number or something else with the same specs, but this should get you started.
    1 point
  9. Face work, edge work, shooting board were all done with my #5 until I started buying specific task planes. It was and still is a work horse for me. Having said that after about a year I added a #4 then some block planes then specialty planes etc, now after about 6 years I have 20 plus hand planes. Don't get me wrong I will never give up my power tools but I have found the quality of my work has improved noticeably since adding hand tools to the arsenal. I don't change the blade between tasks but with a standard plane you can move the blade in and out to adjust the depth of cut while you work which is not something you can do on low angle planes.
    1 point
  10. These are final pictures of Stage One. "Stage One" - what does that mean? Well, the first step is to build the cabinet under the bench. The second stage will be to fit out the drawers for the tools. I plan to do some of the latter shortly, and some later. I will post these as they are done. For now, here is the underbench cabinet ... The rear, before the back was installed ... The front. The ring pulls are antiqued brass (they are not shiny). I need to work them a little more to remove the still-new look. These were chosen as they drop down and do not project out from the front of the cabinet ... Under the bench ... The bench top received a little flattening, and a single coat of danish oil ... Someone is sure to ask why the cabinet is low. The answer is that there needs to be space for hold downs ... The drawers manage about 90% extension ... One of the first fit outs will involve this set of Kiyohisa bench chisels I have been collecting one-by-one (these are no longer available) ... And here is one of the small drawers ... Thanks for supporting the build to date. Hopefully there were some aspects that will prove helpful. Regards from Perth Derek
    1 point