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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/20/21 in all areas

  1. Your house maybe too small, or have hallways too narrow, for the typical demilune table. My wife wanted some thing for dropping keys and such so I made this. Cherry top and bottom with MDF core covered with a cherry veneer, maple legs, a small drawer in the middle for holding miscellaneous objects. It’s nothing special and not everything I wanted it to be, but it will do the trick. Attached to the wall with a keyhole and a pan head screw into the stud. I originally considered a four-leg design but this seem to work out more practical. Also, I attached the veneer using the thick white glue mentioned earlier. It does not soak through and warp the veneer so it’s practical for small pieces.
    6 points
  2. It's the monolith from 2001.
    3 points
  3. From architecture hub: "The oldest door still in use in Rome. Cast in bronze for emperor Hadrian's rebuilding, they date from about 115 AD. Each door is solid bronze seven and a half feet wide & twenty-five feet high, yet so well balanced they can be pushed or pulled open easily by one person.” Now, who’s going to be owning my projects in just 50 years?
    2 points
  4. It has been awhile since I have been able to update this post. I have accomplished several things, not all related to the shop. There is a bathroom with a tub/shower above my shop. My youngest son moved back in for awhile. I don't mind him moving in. He is quiet, helps around the house and pays a good amount in rent. The tub in his bathroom caused a leak into the shop below. We investigated and found a couple of things. The biggest was that there was a gap between the tile backsplash, the tub and the glass enclosure that the water was funneling water down and into the shop. We dug all of the old grout and caulking out and packed it full with fresh, good quality caulk and that seems to have solved the issue for now. We also found a gap between the wall and the floor that you could stick your hand through. Had to fix that too. And, to top things off, as my son was replacing the glass door in it tracks, it exploded in his hands.... literally exploded. It was made of tempered glass and I guess it decided it didn't want to exist anymore. We swept up glass from 25 feet away. Luckily, my son wears glasses, so he didn't suffer anything more than a couple of tiny cuts. The look on his face when it happened as priceless. One minute, he is holding the glass and the next his hands are holding air. He had the most bewildered look on his face. Scared the hell out of the cat too! So we got the shop ceiling patched up and my lumber rack reinstalled. While I was at it, I added the necessary electrical to hang some additional ceiling lights, which I have started to install. Plus started the weeding out process, so I have more room in the shop. Tossed out a bunch of scraps and clutter. One dust collection project I have had in mind for awhile was to replace the main duct elbows with PVC electrical conduit elbows where possible. My ducts are 4" schedule 40 ABS drain pipe. The elbows are fairly tight. They worked ok all these years, but I was curious to see if they would improve things. The conduit elbows are 16" radius vs maybe 5" radius and much smoother. I replaced one of elbows in one of the main branch lines. Here is what the original elbow next to the conduit elbow looks like: Lots smoother. After cutting the old elbow out and replacing it, the duct piece looks like this: It seems to flow better, so I am happy with this change. I still have to dig the one in the back of my tablesaw out and replace it. That is going to be fun because it runs around my 80 gallon air compressor that is bolted to the floor. Then I will extend the duct shown here to the new tool island, add electrical, and I can get back to woodworking. There is light at the end of the tunnel, and I don't think it is a locomotive.
    2 points
  5. Both table are adjustable on most jointers. Otherwise you would need to level the cutterhead to the outfeed. There may be jointers that do this but, I have not bumped into them. Anyone who would rather shim dovetail ways to align jointer tables rather than turn an eccentric cam has a different idea of fun than I do .
    2 points
  6. Actually, the circ saw is spraying out sawdust, which is a known carcinogen. . .
    2 points
  7. Congratulations on the inbound bundle of joy. I'm going to echo all the sentiments folks have already shared. Frankly, most if not all woodworking tools have those California warnings plastered all over their manuals. Does that mean that a circular saw is really spraying carcinogens everywhere? No. Like @legenddc says, the warnings are in place of paying for prohibitively expensive and essentially unhelpful (for the majority of consumers and cases) testing. I have 11 month old twins. I care about what environmental factors I subject them to. That said, my wife and I aren't so paranoid that we're going to sell our house and move into a handwoven canvas yurt to escape modern materials. If you keep your house relatively clean, maybe run an air filter if you have anyone sensitive to dust etc., and get fresh air circulating through your house with some frequency everything should be a-ok. Now, if you're looking to satisfy a partner's paranoia re: materials used in the nursery, go with solid wood and shellac and/or milk paint and you can legitimately tell said partner you've used materials that won't offgas anything nasty or be problematic if gnawed on.
    2 points
  8. Here is a door that I completed in December. It is a stave core door. The inside is popular and the outside is Wenge and maple. I also did all of the stained glass. The inlay is their cattle brands, because they live on a cattle ranch. The first one is without the side glass installed. Also there is a short time-lapse of the process.
    1 point
  9. It's a shame they don't last long, in bloom. This is in front of the rental house. They're not quite at their peak, but I was down there, and might not remember to take a picture later. This is also before I've cleaned up the beach I reclaimed last year. There has to be over a thousand, and maybe even two.
    1 point
  10. Those red ones are still not fully opened. Here is another picture of some Azaleas. This is the driveway coming into our house, and horse barn. There is a mile long state road, that comes down the middle of our place. We call both that, and this gravel path, our "driveway". Back when Pam and I were still not married, the Summer of 1979, we were visiting her Parents. There was a lady near where they lived, who started large, Hybrid Azaleas on the sides of her driveway, and sold them for $1.50 a piece. I was driving a 1965 Buick (another story), with a large trunk. I told the lady that I'd buy as many as she could fit in the trunk, not having any idea how many that would be. She got 65 in there. We spent several weekends planting them, where we planned to build Pam's pottery shop. I think they all lived. I just grabbed this picture on the way in. The Pink ones on the right, and any you see down the driveway from that are some of those. Those pink ones are about 7' tall now. The white ones to the left are just starting to open. That's the horse barn roof you can see, in the background, and part of the house roof to the left. The White Oak near the left of the barn was a little one I moved with an excavator about 20 years ago. It's thriving. We had our 41st Anniversary, and my Mother's 105th Birthday, two days ago, on the 18th. We said we could "fix up" the pottery shop, and live there for a while. We've raised two children in it, and are still here.
    1 point
  11. Short of perhaps (and only perhaps) epoxy, nothing will prevent the movement of water vapor between the wood surface and the atmosphere. But paint, polyurethane, paraffin and anchorseal, etc will slow the process down (some are more effective than others). It is the rapid loss of moisture through the end grain that causes logs and lumber to crack. Slowing the process down allows the log/lumber to loose water with out cracking. When applied to end grain only it tends to balance the loss of water from end and long grain surfaces. As long as the applied film remains intact it will slow the water loss.
    1 point
  12. Seems like their goddess Cardea is still protecting those hinges. "Cardea was the ancient Roman goddess of health, thresholds, door handles, and hinges. Her name comes from cardo, meaning door-pivot. She protected children against vampires and witches, and was also the benefactress of craftsmen." (from https://www.dullmensclub.com/did-you-know-in-rome-there-was-a-goddess-of-hinges-cardea/)
    1 point
  13. I have always wanted a hallway table at the entrance to the home. Never had a space that would take one. Yours is a great solution to meeting the desire with a custom solution for the space. Nicely done!
    1 point
  14. Too pretty to drop keys on to.
    1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. Well, we re-did our kitchen back in 2015, and we have the same problem. We have stained our entire house, all the trim, woodwork, doors, wainscoting, etc... with Minwax, colonial maple since 1997, and we have never had this problem, until the kitchen that we re-did it in 2015. I think it was a bad batch of Minwax. My husband could not figure out what he had done wrong, and after seeing all of your pictures and looking at the time frame, he did nothing wrong, it was a bad batch of stain or poly! And AceHoleInOne, I completely agree with you....Here I am in 2021 and this post is still helpful, as I just was coming on as we are going to try and go around the kitchen and fix all the pieces that have the white marks. Not ALL of the trim, just some of them appeared with the white marks. Very strange. I have been able to deal with this for years because I would use Old English furniture oil and I'm able to get the white marks to disappear for a few days, but then they come back. Anyway, as you can see from my pictures, it's nothing you all did wrong, because like I said, we have been staining all the trim and wood in our home with the same method for years, and we always did it in our garage in all types of weather and never had this issue! Well, thank you for this forum as my husband is happy to know it's nothing he did wrong. I will be contacting Minwax to let them know. Maybe they are already aware of the issue. Good Luck!
    1 point
  17. Ross, have you ever used the Penofin? I know Drew has recommended it. I bought some “transparent natural tone” this past week for a couple of small patio tables I built. The legs are pecan, the slats are walnut and the rest is butternut. Although I’m not totally disappointed, aside from the walnut, the rest looks like a golden oak color. I do have a piece of teak and can try it on it If OP would like? On a more positive note, I applied it according to directions, flood the surface and wipe clean in 30 minutes and in 12 hours there was no tacky residue. Smooth as glass. I’ll report back in a couple of years on the durability .
    1 point
  18. Nope. Tape on one end and a block clamped to the other.
    1 point
  19. Very nice, Colin! Was it difficult to wrap the veneer around those curves?
    1 point
  20. Penofin, or similar decking oil.
    1 point
  21. I hate to say it, but I think your only option will be to sand it bare and start over. A scraper will speed the process. Real teak doesn't need much protection from the elements, unless you don't want the natural silver-gray color. In that case, a paint-like stain is probably a good thing.
    1 point
  22. Me too. Folks who are unsure if they need a jointer are either doing things that don’t require well milled stock or are comfortable wondering why their parts don’t align well .
    1 point
  23. Definitely aliens.
    1 point
  24. I was taking pictures of the moon and on one of them I captured what looks like a shadow on the surface of the moon. It could also be something that got in the way between my camera and the moon, like a bird or a plane, I wouldn't know. I'm posting pics with and without the shadow.
    1 point
  25. I can only advise you to look at more DC than you think you will need.
    1 point
  26. Nice sunset: Then it lighted up:
    1 point