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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/27/21 in all areas

  1. Finally took a day off yesterday. Today, more wiring.
    4 points
  2. Man isn't that the truth! I went to look at the new F150 recently and quickly got to $74K and while it was a really nice truck with the hybrid engine I decided my 2015 Canyon was going to be staying with me a while longer lol. Spent some time working on a new shooting board today.
    3 points
  3. I didn't see any "Members only" flags on the link to this video, but there may be. Michael Fortune video on cutting curves with a bandsaw. Note his practice of riding the piece against the side of the blade. https://www.finewoodworking.com/2011/04/22/how-to-cut-curves-on-the-bandsaw
    3 points
  4. 19 years, and she still wears my ring.
    2 points
  5. The metal for a topsoil leveling drag came today. The driver was worried about coming down a dead end road for a mile, but he found the easiest unloading spot, and turnaround that he has been to. He just circled around in the field, with smooth, hard ground under the grass. That's the entrance to our house, with the Azaleas, that you see in the background, a hundred yards behind the tractor. FIrst time I've used the clamp-on forks. I should have bought them 20 years ago. It will be the first job for the new welder. Plans, in my head, are for 6-1/2 feet wide, and 12 feet long. Wi
    2 points
  6. Worked on the welder cart a little more this morning. I bought the best, made in the USA 5" lockable casters I could find for it. Typically, they come with fixed wheels on the back, but I'd like to have one with four swivel wheels, for easier parking in the shop. I was a little worried it would be a sideways trip hazard, and didn't want to slam a 3200 dollar welder on the floor. It works like it will be okay. It probably wouldn't be so good in a commercial setting, with anybody using it, but only I am going to use this one. I painted it, mounted the casters, and tool cabinet, but th
    2 points
  7. Oh it's an Iowa product.... might have to consider something else. I don't know how i feel about supporting my southern rival . JK That's good to know @treeslayer that they are more or less a local company. That helps a lot in making my decision. I really like that all of the fittings and connections appear to be sturdy brass. I've also noticed that some rental places use these for their rental units. Unless Tom has any drastically negative things to say i'll probably be buying one next week. It's going to be Megan's Birthday gift, more or less as a joke but she has been hounding me to bu
    2 points
  8. They are addicting. I have tray in a drawer that holds these loaded with multiple layers of (around) 120, 180, 220 and 400. I actually have a pair with 220 since that seems to be my most often used grit. The little organizer tray that they set in is a tool box tray from Harbor Freight. They are just a few bucks and fit the Preppin Weapon perfectly.
    2 points
  9. I share wtnhighlander's concerns. However, I think it might work if you use a very good grade of 3/4" plywood, similar to baltic birch, use splines in your 45 deg joints, and glue with epoxy. The epoxy is not so much for strength as for extra working time. I also agree that the same method using S4S lumber will give better results and probably for comparable cost to plywood. In addition, using solid wood will allow you to select the wood grain so that all four sides are quarter or rift sawn, if you like.
    2 points
  10. First, that leg design should certainly support the weight, but I would feel better about those mitered joints holding together if the leg 'boxes' were of solid wood, not plywood. Unless you add some reinforcement, the solid wood would form a better glue joint. If you own a tablesaw, and have access to quality S4S stock, this is very doable. In either case (ply or solid), I would fill the part where the apron (at least) attaches to create a solid section for joinery.
    2 points
  11. I have respectfully disagree on two counts. The parking lot at work is full of redneck pickups that easily approach the $100k mark. But my 'dream vehicle' could like come in under $10k, if only the EPA would allow it...
    2 points
  12. Worked on the cart for the new welder, this morning. This old Enco metal bandsaw is cheap, and slow, but makes a pretty cut. It can be converted from horizontal, to vertical, pretty easily. I got it all welded up using my little flux cored welder. I might have a chance to work on it tomorrow. It's not a lot different than woodworking, just stuff gets hot enough to burn you. I turned the Husky tool cabinet upside down, and cut the angle iron for the cart to fit. The Magswitch do-dads make it all a lot simpler.
    2 points
  13. Congratulations, Carus! Sounds like you found the right one!
    1 point
  14. just send that money south Drew , great woman you have that you have there, i wish mine wanted a pressure washer!
    1 point
  15. Yes it is thought I would give it a try looking to improve the shooting of 45 angles.
    1 point
  16. If it were my table, I'd do anything I could to make the legs of solid stock. Not because your plywood approach wouldn't be strong enough, but because I would really want to taper the legs. For a table the size you're building, I figure you'll want legs that are 3" or 3-1/2" square at the top - smaller, and it will look insubstantial, even if it's structurally sound. But legs that size, if they aren't tapered are going to look awfully "clunky." I'd want to taper the two inside faces of each leg from full width just below the apron to maybe 2" or 2-1/4" at the bottom. If you need to, u
    1 point
  17. Smaller cooler will make the fish look bigger!
    1 point
  18. Took a while to get here but my first Preppin Weapon has arrived. I have a feeling I’ll regret not buying the 4 pack but I can always add more later.
    1 point
  19. I wasn't going to include the cleats or the bullnose if I tried to make the table. Do you think standard through tenons to the top be strong enough? I am very early in my joinery journey and have yet to attempt through tenons, and I thought this might be a nice chance to try it out. I saw a cool video last night that used wedged mortise and tenons to attach a top (see below), but this appears to be way beyond my skill level at this point.
    1 point
  20. Haven’t ever seen a small cooler on a fishing boat. Gotta think big and have confidence!
    1 point
  21. Just mpo but I’m not in favor of the front and back of the top being laminated for the thickness and the bull nose. The views of it from the sides look odd. Also, from the link, it gives you a rotate view and I notice at least three horizontal cross pieces on the inside of each side. If you go that route, you need to allow for wood movement and not attach them with glue but with screws with elongated holes in the cross pieces. We’d like to see this in progress as a journal which would also allow you to ask further questions if the need arises. Good luck!
    1 point
  22. As Mick mentioned, the tooth set can leave saw marks, but on curves, I notice 'peaks' almost any time I have to back up and make blade clearance in a tight cut. Seems very difficult to resume the kerf in the exact spot, but patience can make it happen.
    1 point
  23. I used to have a 12v plug-in cooler for keeping my son's medical formula chilled when we traveled by car. Thing couldn't keep ice from melting. A Yeti would be a better investment.
    1 point
  24. I got this jointer at a estate sale years ago super cheap. Being the procrastinator that I am it sat in storage till I could clean it up and replace the knives. After finally getting fed up with the lack of depth in my 6” jointer I finally set my mind to switch over to the 8”. Instead of just replacing the knives however I decided to switch over to a Byrd head since I liked them so much on my previous jointer. The head ended bring 3x more than what I paid for the jointer but I figure it was worth the investment. And while I was at it I decided to get a Byrd head for my planer as well. I s
    1 point
  25. Knowing a lot of engineers, mechanical and otherwise, most if not all of these situations exist because the overall project manager isn't willing to increase the product cost enough to solve the solution. It's not really fair to pin this on the engineer when they ultimately don't get the say in a lot of these decisions. I personally have had to make design exceptions multiple times because the owner isn't willing to pay for the proper design. This usually results in a waiver of liability or in extreme cases a mutual agreement to work with other people. It's getting better in some way
    1 point
  26. Most of the cost of reclaimed material is in the sourcing and processing of the material. Getting access to the buildings that are being removed can be tricky and removing the wood can be tricky and possibly dangerous. After the wood is obtained there is a lot of manual labor removing nails and debris. To put $12/bf in perspective 1 guy would have to process an 8' 1x6 (remove from building, transport to your shop, pull all the nails, and dispose of waste material) every 15 min provided obtaining the material was free, which it often isn't. If you are a fan of the look of reclaimed lumber
    1 point
  27. I got started adding the edging. I mitered the edges and glued it down. I just used tape as clamps to hold it down. After removing the tape. Same process for the shelves. Here is a little trick when doing miters like this. If you try and glue the piece down while fitting your miters, they always have a tendency to move on you. What I do for this is use titebond quick and thick and glue the edging together making it one piece. Then glue the whole piece into place. Finally got an idea of what this is going to look like.
    1 point
  28. Finally got all of the base board and shoe put on through out the house this weekend. It's starting to feel a little bit more like home with every small improvement.
    1 point
  29. I feel the same way about paint. I just painted a couple rooms in my house with paint/primer. It was supposed to be a one time cover all the problems paint. I assure you, the chemists that make paint, have never painted anything but their toenails.
    1 point
  30. It’s my last recon purchase a festool etsc 125. will report when I put it to some extended use. The little I’ve used it so far however seems to yield good results.
    1 point
  31. I should have specified that a 2" hose will flow roughly 3x more air than a 1.5" hose. 2.5" hoses will flow considerably more than a 2" hose. The area is the square of the radius so even small changes have large impacts. I'm not saying it won't work, it just won't work well. A 3 HP unit with minimal losses in the main duct work is an entirely different situation as well. 2-3"WC of suction is a large difference in the DC world.
    1 point
  32. I can't stop staring at the red triangle and the date. How am I supposed to rebuild my kitchen and other cabinets without tools? This metal shortage is really starting to piss me off.
    0 points