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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/30/21 in all areas

  1. HVAC lands. Outdoor unit up. Slab done. More fun with HVAC tomorrow.
    6 points
  2. The middle 2 rails between the middle and bottom drawers decided to bow. One in, the other out. Behind the rail is dead space. So I added oak 2 plus inches wide on edge. On the one that was bowed out I removed about 3/16" but leaving wood on the ends.It makes contact for a couple of inches leaving a long gap. There are 3 screws, one in the middle which pulls it flat and 2 more on the ends to attach it to the back side of the rail. The middle screw is the adjuster. Still a lot of gap left if more adjustments needed later. The other rail worked by adding a straight piece with screws. I am a
    5 points
  3. It’s a big mortise and tenon. ¾” x 4 ¼” x 5 ½”. I’m using epoxy so it should not only give me plenty of open time, but also allow the joints to slip together easily. I also slotted the tenon stock for pressure release after shooting that video.
    3 points
  4. The PantoRouter POP! Got the floating mortise and tenons cut this morning. https://youtu.be/Ql2FB6zwxLw
    3 points
  5. Just remembered a booboo I made one time. There are two types of Johnson's paste wax. One is the normal stuff. The other is Johnson's floor wax, designed to prevent slipping. I put it on my saw once and could barely move a board across it. It was a pain to remove - had to scrub it off with mineral spirits. You might want to avoid it
    3 points
  6. Melamine can work pretty well if you design it right, but you need to know that there are multiple types and grades. The stuff in the big box stores is the low grade and will have trouble holding fasteners - it crumbles. The better cabinet grade stuff has a denser core and is more structurally strong. All of the cabinets in my shop are made from it and they are strong. You can get it from lumber yards that sell to the cabinet makers. Plywood is better and cheaper there too. Take a look at Confirmat fasteners too. They work great Melanine and MDF panels.
    1 point
  7. Yesterday I paid $52.50 for 3/4”, $48.95 for 1/2” and $19.50 for 1/4” birch ply from the hardwood dealer.
    1 point
  8. You might look into using hardwood veneer ply like oak or maple from you big box store. It is mostly the construction grade material that seems to be seeing the high prices. In my local Lowes 3/4 Maple was $58 a sheet and 3/8 OSB was $38. You wouldn't want to us OSB for you top but the pricing in my location tells me you might want to look at hardwood ply.
    1 point
  9. Now for the top. I started by making the curved piece that will hold the glass. To do this, the first thing I did was to make a template with my cnc. Because my cnc is small, I made it in two parts and glued it together. Once I had that made, I was ready to start making the form. I glued some mdf together. I couldn't glue all of it together at once because my flush trim bit wan't tall enough. I traced the shape and took it over to the band saw and rough cut the shape. Once that was done I took it over to the router and flush trimmed it. Once that
    1 point
  10. Finished up the template in a short burst of shoptime. First, I clamped on a pretty straight level as a fence extension. This let me trim the back edge parallel to the front. I also parallel trimmed the end tabs. Next, I used a file, and the Spagnuolo Special flexible sanding strip to fair out the curved edges. Last, I slathered on a quick coat of shellac, more to help the edges sand out less splintery, than anything else. Once that dried for a few minutes, I could use the template as a gauge to determine how many pieces, and how long they must be, to glue up fo
    1 point
  11. After getting sidetracked for at least a week, I finally finished my wild idea. It works like a charm. I can drag it over grass, and it doesn't harm it a bit, and won't even cut a Dandelion off. It's 6-1/2 x 12 feet-like a Jointer plane for topsoil. I could have made it a lot heavier, but it works great. I don't have any screened topsoil yet-still waiting on the big excavator to come pile the dirt up for another guy to bring a big screen. I used some dirt I had piled up with the loader. It has some sticks and rocks in it, which requires a lot more passes, because one piece of ju
    1 point
  12. @gee-dub, this is just an anecdotal observation, but my external vent goes straight out, and the noise is quite minimal. The blower inside produces far more sound than the air flowing out the exhaust. I think what you should do is construct a giant pan flute in the exhaust stream. When the music begins to stutter, that means chips are flying out, and its time to empty the bin!
    1 point
  13. @ChestnutThe perspective on SketchUp makes them look graduated. In the drawing they are consistent. This was just a quickie example to indicate that I plan to do 'something'. I foresee some mad scientist efforts with an ammeter. Running the DC with the exhaust unobstructed and the shop doors open to get a base line and then adding things to observe impact. The muffler, the baffle, the shop with doors open, the shop with doors closed, etc. Fortunately (or unfortunately) my work in debugging protocols and designing failure resiliency into complex systems has made me painfully system
    1 point