Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/09/21 in all areas

  1. So almost 4 years later this project needs an update. Maybe a year after completion the rear leg let loose from the lower shelf. There was enough strength in the front joinery (domino) that allowed the stool to continue to function for another 2 years. A few days ago Megan told me the shelf broke, it's used as a foot rest for leg shaving, luckily it broke while not in use. It's started to look rough. We have a lot of minerals in our water so even trying to keep it clean there is only so much a person can do. I'm also suspecting that the white haze is the old finish de-lam
    5 points
  2. I heard a commercial earlier that Home Depot has the kids workshop kits again. May have to pick up some of them next time I'm there. Busy day here. Had a contractor fixing a slight leak by our skylight while another was here removing some attic insulation, filling in gaps and blow in some new insulation. Hoping the 2nd floor will stay cooler and we all sleep better.
    2 points
  3. In regards to the spindle sander, it's a real nice tool to have, esp for small stuff. With bandsaw boxes you really can't sand the inside as the fit is predicated on the slightly irregular cut lines matching up for gluing. I guess you can always sand the inside surfaces you are not gluing, but I've found that unnecessary, flocking works great there. Sanding the outside of the boxes with the spindle sander is possible. But for me cleaning up bandsaw cuts mean rasps, rasps, and rasps. Spokeshaves are also nice but you need to watch the grain direction. Rasps have no such worry and they can
    2 points
  4. Both HVAC units in and functional. TIme for e few catch-up details before starting the DC shed.
    2 points
  5. Back to new! looks good.
    1 point
  6. Beautiful fix and ready for more loving use.
    1 point
  7. Now that’s neat looking! Good job on the refinish.
    1 point
  8. Agree that stickiness in BLO is due to too thick an application or very old product. Time will generally heal a too-thick application but we are talking weeks. I have a few 'blends' that I use. In my mixes that contain BLO I use a bit of Japan Drier which works quite well for me. A little goes along way. I use about 1/4" ounce per quart of BLO content. This turns into just a few milliliters when added to a 1:1:1 blend of BLO, MS and varnish. The good news it makes it economical. The bad news is that it is easy to use too much ;-)
    1 point
  9. Yes I used the jointer on the surface, then jointer on one edge referenced off that face, and then through the planer. To be honest the boards were pretty heavy and I only have a small grizzly six inch jointer so there is a high probability I did not get them quite right to start off the jointer. I have had ok success when I have jointed and planed smaller lumber for the kitchen helper and other size projects, but I have never tried something of this size with my machines. I dream about getting a little larger jointer someday but it is down on the list at this point.
    1 point
  10. @Woodworking_Hobby, were the planks jointed on one face prior to going through the planer? Many new woodworkers do not fully understand the relationship these machines maintain. The jointer is used to create one flat face, while the thickness planer references that flattened face in order to make the opposite face parallel and smooth. Using the planer alone will not remove twists and bows from a board.
    1 point
  11. Thanks! I will give it a try and see how it goes! I must admit I am a little nervous as I have not done that much hand plane work on my projects and was worried I was going to take off too much or not get flat. I was a little disappointed on how “rough” it turned out but maybe that is typical. I thought I had the boards all milled to the same thickness and used the domino trick for alignment similar to what folks have done on their Roubo builds. From lowest stop to highest spot on the slab is maybe a hair under an 1/8 or a hair over a 1/16…hard to tell. Maybe that is a win but from some othe
    1 point
  12. Who can made this woodwork project
    1 point
  13. Got a little more prep done. I'm not sure if I showed this before. This is the general idea for the exhaust. Although not shown in this quickie version of the baffle tower, the shelves will be changeable as I am unsure of the impact of the captive air mass in that chamber. I am building in the ability to go to an upgraded unit if required but am hoping I can make my little 2HP unit do the job via careful duct and exhaust pathway resistance planning (fingers crossed).
    1 point
  14. I usually hedge my bets and buy double of everything i need and a couple of what I don't need but could see a possibility. I just return what I don't use. This was the advice the guy gave me in the plumbing department. Given that the stuff is $1 buying 30 pieces you don't need doesn't add up to much compared to the lost time in the extra trips. Especially when you can just return them later. To save them the extra expenses on transaction costs i just get store credit, i usually spend it right away anyway.
    1 point