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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/08/21 in Posts

  1. Sometimes walnut is steamed and in the rough it appears to have no sap wood. On the first pass on the jointer the true colors are revealed. Is the purpose to hide the sap wood making it easier to sell?
    2 points
  2. Definitely better but I'm puzzled by what I can see of the anatomy and have to dig into this a bit more before I can say anything except that it's definitely not one of the American mahoganies (Cuban or Honduran) since it lacks the marginal parenchyma that is characteristic of those two.
    2 points
  3. @Coop, better safe.
    2 points
  4. Back in May I posted a picture of two nightstands I had built for our Master bedroom. Recently I started the bed on this project, but it has been slow going for a few reasons. One - even in retirement I only spend 4 or 5 hours a day in the shop because there are other things like reading the paper and drinking coffee. Second - and more of an effect on this project is the size of it and the size of my shop. Building a king bed in a two car sized shop is a chore. At first I was thinking that I would build the foot board get it out of the way and then the head board. Then reality set in, first thing is there are two legs for the foot and two for the head board, also there are three raised panels on each and you are just asking for problems milling the foot board parts first and then trying to duplicate the set-ups when you start to work on the head board. Along with this there are stile and rail parts that are similar. This is a long way of saying I have parts stacked all over the shop and every time I want to us a tool there is something that needs to be moved. Needless to say this slows things down. I haven't been real diligent in my photo taking but here are some to catch you up. The first thing i did was a bent lamination for a piece that will be the top molding for the head board. I started here because I wanted to make the form, us it and then get it out of the way and out of the shop. I also want to use the finished molding to draw my shape on the panel that the molding will go on so they match up nicely. At the same time I started gluing up the legs. I used Poplar in the center and 4/4 sapele front and back. These are the foot board legs with the head board legs lurking in the background. This was the finished molding, it is a little over an inch square. Next I glued on a 1/8 inch thick veneer to hide the glue lines. Head board legs. Foot board legs. After this I worked on the raised panels, no work in process pictures just the final product. The end grain cove took a lot of hand sanding clear up to 400 to get it to look like the edge grain coving. I think they all came out pretty nice but I did give more attention to the head board panels (top) as far as matching up the grain to hide glue lines because when you walk into the room they will be more eye level. Each of the 6 panels is made up of three pieces. I am using floating tenons all around so next up I cut all my mortises in the foot board stiles and rails. The stiles were first using my mortising jig and a 3/8 up spiral bit. I cut them 1 1/2 inches deep. Now I don't want you all laughing at this next picture. The rails are 69 inches long and to cut the mortises in the ends I need to get my jig about 70 inches high. So I built a down and dirty platform 29 inches tall to clamp my jig to. I wasn't going to pay the current silly prices for some construction lumber ,but I did have a neighbor having their kitchen remodeled and I found a couple of scraps of 2 X 10 in his tear out pile that would work along with a couple of pieces of ply on my part. I had to stand on a stool. A bunch of tenon stock out of scraps. First dry fit of the footboard.
    1 point
  5. I’m sorry. And that’s ok as I’m sure we’ve all done things that we are not particularly proud of at one time or another.
    1 point
  6. If vertical movement in the fence is the "fence drift" your talking about that can be addressed with service. Side to side fence drive means you need to hold the tool a bit more firmly. The Domino should be bang on flush every time. Like I said before if it's not return it or complete a warranty repair. Festool has a no hassle 90 day return and I've used it. I'm posting this because i want to make sure that any one in the future that may see this understands that any fence drift is unacceptable and the product is defective and needs to be serviced or returned.
    1 point
  7. I assume you are talking about the wood ID site, but I actually do have a database. It's for wood names: http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/wood_name_database/
    1 point
  8. You are right! And I even bought a 3/4” sheet to act as an assembly table for my bathroom door. But when I finished with it, I cut it up and took it to the office and put it in the dumpster for lack of space to keep it.
    1 point
  9. Phinds, your data base is amazing.
    1 point
  10. Nothing wrong with MDF. Been used in the cabinet industry for a long time.
    1 point
  11. Ha! Don't tell me you've never made an MDF jig. There are times when the flatness and consistent thickness of MDF just can't be beat.
    1 point
  12. JMO, but mdf has it’s place, to remain on the racks of HD and Lowe’s.
    1 point
  13. Regarding the issue with the alignment, I have attached some pictures below that should help clarify. Notice how in the left frame, when you zoom in, the "bricks" are not quite straight. Zoomed out, it doesn't look too bad.
    1 point
  14. Ironically, this came to me at a semi-opportune time. I am building a sitting bench that after dry fitting, it is 2” lower than I would like. I was planning on adding a 2” block to each leg, end grain to end grain, reinforcing the joints with 1/4” ss dowels with epoxy as an adhesive. Wondering now if the dowels are really needed? Maybe better safe than sorry?
    1 point
  15. The end result is something we should all be doing anyway...make the JOINTERY hold the piece together, and use glue to hold the joint in place. The only stress on the glue should be in the direction the joint slides together, which, in turn, should be the direction least likely to be under stress in normal use.
    1 point
  16. I do segmented turnings after gluing up the individual rings I have to send them through my 16/32 belt sander I've never had the rings break apart all the pieces are just glued end grain to end grain and aren't structured until the segments are glued to each other in a brick pattern I'm glad to know that end grain to end grain glue ups are stronger than I thought, I'm still going to baby the process anyway. Thanks for sharing.
    1 point
  17. There are two sets that I have seen: the Tickler set and the Bora set. They are very similar. I think the Bora set has larger casters on it. I bought a set and put them on my Jet 1442 lathe. It took some work to drill and tap the legs, but it worked. Lathe moves around without any trouble. A bit of an issue to get the lathe up on the wheels - I have to lift it a bit to do so, but not really an issue.
    1 point
  18. If you all ready have a plunge router for hand held uses you would be better off looking for just the router motor of any brand you are looking at. A lot of companies sell just the bare motor, no handles or plunge mechanism.
    1 point
  19. I think the information that is missed here is that the end grain to side grain while somewhat strong isn't weak because of the end grain but because of the very limited long grain support. The board is glued to a small strip of long grain that is connected to the leg with lignin bonds. These lignin bonds are easily broken as apparent in the video. The other aspect not shown is that this bond is highly susceptible to end grain run out. What a M&T, Bridle, Halflap, joint does is connects the beam (apron etc) to the leg in a manner that eliminate the reliance on the lignin bond between wood fibers of the leg. The beam is connect to fibers that run the length of the leg, or maximize the amount of lignin bonds before grain run out so that the lignin bonds are stronger than the wood adjacent to the joint. This is good information as it illustrates to me for the first time that the length of a tenon is more important that the width. It also illustrates how important grain run out can be and is another nod in the favor of rift sawn material for legs. Wood movement isn't mentioned either. Differential movement could easily break an end grain bond without any stress being applied to the joint. If he let the samples go through 2-3 seasonal moisture swings would the results be the same?
    1 point
  20. All I have to say is that appears to be a heck of a step down from the door by your drill press.
    1 point
  21. Is the joinery just butt joints glue and screws? If so I would add a back panel to keep the carcass from racking, even if you used dado's and rebates I would add a back panel.
    1 point
  22. Yes, side of the leg. The ones Marc linked to on his out feed table build. Hopefully I’ll get to install them this weekend and will report back how they work.
    1 point
  23. Those attach to the side of the leg. I have two sets of them (or something similar) that I got from Rockler.
    1 point
  24. It was a weekend for Labours of love. Saturday was hauling horses for my Daughter's last local show for the year. It was fun for me as it is normally my wife's department. The two of them are going on a big trip, taking in three shows in two weeks in September so I called dibs to take her this time. Sunday was bucking and splitting the last of this season's fire wood. We burn about 3 cords a winter and i like to have two years supply in the shed. This year a neighbour did some clearing and was kind enough to deck a bunch of alder and hemlock to give me at least two years supply. It's more than will fit in the shed so some will be stacked in the yard. Today was bee day, doing mite tests checking on stores and feeding them in preparation for winter. I really enjoy beekeeping but it is a lot like any other livestock or farming...lot's of work and investment in hopes of a good yeild but as many years of disappointment as years of plenty.
    1 point
  25. went to Milwaukee and went to my son's wood guy, really good person, lots of various wood, spalted maple, birdseye maple, slabs all kinds, flame birch and many more his web site is under Milwaukeewoodworks.com and his name is Allen, sorry the link won't post for some reason but here's a couple of pictures, not at his place all the time so give him a shout before you go there
    1 point
  26. After hours of sanding, first coat of oil is on.
    1 point
  27. You can see just by the quantity of responses over the last few days that dust collection is an easy subject to get information overload on. The old rule of thumb was to do the best you could given your budget. We now have to add availability to that rule. Basically you have chip collection and dust collection. Chip collection gathers the larger stuff and you wear a mask or eject the exhaust outdoors. Dust collection opens the can of worms but fundamentally: - If your return air is pumped back into your workspace (a basement, neighbors or weather conditions that don't allow for an outside exhaust) it must be clean. - Clean return air is .5 micron filtered or better. - Fine filters clog quickly. - A cyclone prevents fine filters from colgging quickly. So you can see it is a sort of building block logic. If you have to breathe your return air you need to filter it well. If you run fine filters and don't want to clean them frequently you need a two stage solution. A cyclone system designed as a cyclone system will likely out perform a single stage system having a second stage placed in the air path. A 1 or 2 HP blower with an exhaust hose shooting outside your work area will be your least expensive solution as long as you don't live in suburbia with neighbors that have a lovely fountain in their yard ;-)
    1 point
  28. As for as a .5 micron bag I’m going to say no. Get the wynn canister filter. A bag filter gives you like 30 sf of filter area and the wynn canister gets you 220 sf of filter area st the same micron level. Its easier to clean and will not clog as often. https://wynnenv.com/woodworking-filters/ i second the separator idea. here’s my set up 3hp 2 canister filters cyclone 6” duct 30 gal can to collect dust
    1 point