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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/04/21 in all areas

  1. The second vertical member is in. This was delayed while I experimented with 2-1/2" tablesaw-overarm / router-table-fence collection versus 4". There's a ton of math you can throw at dust collection but I just went for plain old empirical data. That is; a real world test. The 2-1/2" proved best for me in this installation. That picture makes it look like the overhead is "T" connected. It is actually like so . . . You can just ignore the temporary tape and what-not; this is a mid-fabrication shot . I used commercial plastic blast gates in these positions. I had them on hand and things got a little crowded and clumsy when I tried to fit the self-cleaning style that I make myself. We'll see how this goes. A shop is always evolving so if an alteration is required later on it won't be the first or the last. The 2-1/2" hose will also serve the tablesaw overarm in some fashion as yet to be determined. It won't be green painter's tape . Velcro straps are likely the solution here. The aperture into the guard is quite small so I may have to field modify the hose attachment location as well. I don't use the overarm a lot but time will tell. I am now ready to build out the electrical wire ways that will serve the two groups of machines. First I want to play with the 8" adjustable elbow at the DC exhaust to see if I can make the noise more acceptable.
    3 points
  2. So, I started cutting the tails on the first wide board, that went fine until I made the cut going in the wrong direction on the end tail. I did cut a wedge off a piece of scrap I could glue back on but in the end I just flipped it around and cut it going the right way. One tail on the bottom will be a bit wider, most of it gets covered with the cove molding transitioning from the base anyway. Next I did a sample on scrap to test the pin cutting method and depth. That's when I discovered the mortising bit I thought was a 1/2" deep was actually 3/4 and will be unusable. There will be a 2 day delay waiting for another Amazon order. I set the depth greater to get the bearing riding on the pins and gave it a shot, works fine except the pins stick out a 1/4".
    2 points
  3. After a bit of a break from the chest of drawers, time for a new project. I've got the 4 main Panels glued up and sanded flat. Started cutting dovetails tonight. This will be a semi machine cut process. Tails are cut with a Ridge Carbide blade ground to a 7 degree top angle. Also started by loading up a dado blade and cutting a very shallow rabbit on the back side of the tail boards which will assist with alignment when marking the pins. Once marked out I will cut the pin sides with a hand saw, remove a good chunk of the waste with a coping saw then clean up the rest with a mortising bit in the router with the bearing riding on the sawn pin walls.
    1 point
  4. It passed Inspection today, so now we'll see how long it takes the power company to get here. I did get an email from them that they had received notice of the inspection. Overall, that seems reasonably fast, because I think it was just last Tuesday that I met with the power company Designer about it.
    1 point
  5. My two cents . . . Like so many things, cleaning your blade takes just a few minutes if you don't let it go too long. I have a plastic tray from the dollar store and some L.A.Awesome from the same place. I also have a heavy plastic "toothbrush" format parts cleaning brush. They come in packs from Harbor Freight for cheap and I have been using the first one for years. Put the blade in the tray, spray with L.A. Awesome, and go back to the saw and do a quick maintenance check of bearings, fasteners, etc. Go back to the tray and brush around the teeth lightly making sure you get the face of the tooth. Rinse, dry and return the blade to the saw or put it in the rack as appropriate. A lot of our routine maintenance tasks take just moments if we do them regularly. As to when to clean . . . Whenever the teeth have build up on them that isn't blasting clear with use. As to when to sharpen . . . when you notice increased effort to perform an operation. If you miss this indicator, watch for reduced performance in the form of rough cuts or burning; this would indicate you are overdue. I keep a pair of my most used blades on hand. That way I am not stopped when a set goes out for sharpening. Sending them in multiples also saves on postage. I used to have a good local sharpener but like so many of my local service based companies, the quality has dropped to where I cannot use them. I imagine the old strokers have retired like I have and left the work to the next wave.
    1 point
  6. Just wondering, why did you switch species?
    1 point
  7. Nope. I started having it treated back in like 2008. EAB has already peaked here and the tree is still healthy. This is the tree with the treehouse in my avitar, so it got a little money spent on it. Now that the treehouse is gone I'm not really sure how to stop.
    1 point
  8. Don't worry EAB will kill it in the next 5-10 years? I must have a male ash tree because mine doesn't drop seeds but covers my house and deck in pollen every spring. My Elm tree's drop a boat load of seeds though not quite that bad. My American Chestnuts are around 6' tall now, I'm getting excited for them to flower and start dropping seeds. I"m going to try and germinate them and give the seedlings to arbor societies around my area.
    1 point
  9. I thought about putting a dowel into it or using a domino, but those required a little too much measuring and planning for the timeline I had for the project. In the end, I just used a decent sized screw through the top and down into the support. I held the support in place and traced around where it contacts the top, drilled a pilot hole up from the bottom, then chamfered the top and drove the screws. Before I attached the supports I tested it by putting a lot of my weight on the center of the shelf and there was little sag. With the shelf screwed into the ledger strips all the way around and the 1.5” maple edging, it’s pretty rigid. The supports may help with the long term life of it.
    1 point
  10. Sanding, sanding, sanding... worst parts is ran out of 180 grit, and had to resort to using some Craftsman paper, the "high-end" stufc my local Lowes store carries. Complete and utter garbage. I used up 6 disks, sanding what required only one disk of the Shop Smith 120 grit. It was a sad day when my local store switched to Craftsman. I also started the lye treatment on the cherry bowl. First coat is still wet on the bowl, mostly dry on those 2 little 'pork chops' next to it. They go with another project. A few applications, sanding with 320 between to smooth the raised grain, will give me a deep, candy-apple red. Requires a rinse with diluted vinegar to neutralize the lye, before top-coating. The other pieces I did for this same guy, have mellowed a bit over time. The color is still a deep, dark brick red, slightly more brown than the fresh color.
    1 point
  11. These 2 pieces will install in opposing corners. There is a slot milled to receive a desk top about 6'. There are 2 shelf units that set on top of the drawers. I have them clamped together for temporary stability. There will be 8/4 tops on each piece. Stepped down from the top of the shelves will be another shelf unit going across. Also topped with 8/4. Finish oil sealer semi gloss General. As I am typing this the hinges just came in the mail.
    1 point
  12. Worked on gluing sub-assemblies today. No pics, you've already seen how it goes together. A side note, though... Chemical coloration isn't desirable for every species. I tried the lye on this piece of butternut, and turned it into pressure treated pine! If I had continued, it may have deepened to emerald green, but that's not a look I particularly care for. Fortunately, butternut sands quickly, so the green didn't last long.
    0 points