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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/10/21 in all areas

  1. More like the Dopey Decimal System
    6 points
  2. As promised, here are a couple of photos of the completed audio rack with gear in place -
    5 points
  3. I carry one of these in each of my two vehicles. The cylinder contains CO2 gas and is regulated to 80 psi. Due to the expansion ratio of CO2 to air, it can easily fill two rear tractor tires (not filled with water) or 5-6 car tires. Small, quick and compact. A much smaller CO2 cylinder, unregulated was once included with high end GMC vehicles.
    4 points
  4. Working my way around the corners doing cleanup, the lid sits flat on the top.
    3 points
  5. He obviously is not a head banger music kind of guy, or maybe he is? I can appreciate your shelf assembly a lot better than I can those speakers. Or maybe my 8 track with a reverb is becoming outdated? I’ll never know. Thanks, I think, for sharing. Nice job David!
    3 points
  6. I always mean to order some figure-8s, and never do. So, home center hardware has to substitute. I set the depth with a visual aid on my forstner bit. Then chisel out the recess to acommodate the rectangular straps. Turning them at angles allows the top / seat to expand & contract freely. Still working on the finishing process for the bench, but the bowl is done. After the lye treatment, it took 4 coats of the 'tung oil' finish, buffing with a white abrasive pad, and a coat of wax for soft luster.
    3 points
  7. I’ve avoided listening to super high-end audio setups because I don’t want to desire going down that rabbit hole! Photography, woodworking, and tractoring are expensive enough for me.
    2 points
  8. Don’t handhold Anything while trying to bore with that. Ross, even with a brace, the lead screw needs to match the hardness of the material. Softwoods and hardwoods often require a different lead screw taper.
    2 points
  9. 2 points
  10. 2 points
  11. Do you use the Dewey Decimal System for that cabinet?
    2 points
  12. Screw-point augers work best in a brace. The screw is designed to pull the bit into the wood, to reduce the pressure the user would otherwise need to apply. If you only have a drill motor, try the lowest speed it will manage.
    2 points
  13. You just can't dodge that IBM Blue ;-) Things don't always unpack in the order that suits you best. Three containers had about 80% of what goes in this cabinet though.
    2 points
  14. Half the members here probably don't know why a mainframe computer needed "tape" on a reel. Just the color of blue would almost give away the origins of the cabinet.
    2 points
  15. Glad you like it, Coop! Without those flip stands I would have had to wait until Sandy got home from work each evening to flip these over to spray the second side, all the while hoping I didn't scratch the side I had already sprayed. Making it a one-man job was a game changer for me. Here are the shelves in the drying rack in my 'box room' where all my shipping supplies and photography gear resides. The drying rack allowed me a way to store the shelves for the finish to cure and yet take up very little room while being out of our way - The finished legs; I love the sapwood in that one leg! This is his audio room before the rack was assembled and I have to say it sounds simply amazing. His cables are pure silver and cost over a grand each! Finished Curly Maple top shelf, gorgeous curl in this! The assembled rack and he chose to have the sapwood showing on the front right leg (that's what I was hoping for) - He said it will take a couple of weeks for him to have time to get all the gear on the shelves and get it moved back into place. Assuming he takes a good enough photo I'll post it here. Thanks for checking out this build!
    2 points
  16. I bought this DeWalt tire pump, and so far I'm happy with it. https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-20-Volt-MAX-Inflator-Tool-Only-DCC020IB/305709688?source=shoppingads&locale=en-US&&mtc=Shopping-B-F_D25H-B-D25H-025_028_COMP_AIRTOOL-NA-NA-Feed-PLA-NA-NA-Compressors_Smart&cm_mmc=Shopping-B-F_D25H-B-D25H-025_028_COMP_AIRTOOL-NA-NA-Feed-PLA-NA-NA-Compressors_Smart-71700000081377591-58700006924599093-92700064312898269&gclid=Cj0KCQjw-4SLBhCVARIsACrhWLXxx0rs5REQKNr6kCRWvqjlgLM7-iXciYbSPfw8tMvh_UiNJoU-3W0aArBtEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds It replaced one I bought from the auto parts store that was a certified P.O.S. Loud enough that everyone on the block would know when I was pumping a tire and vibrated so much that I would get a call from the university seismology lab. And best of all it wouldn't really pump air, which was OK because the pressure guage was impossible to read when running and 10 or 20 pounds high when off, so you really wouldn't have known when to stop if it did pump air. The DeWalt makes noise, but not much. It vibrates, but not much. It does pump air and with reasonable alacrity. There are two LCD screens. One is the pressure guage, which is accurate as far as I can tell. The other is the target pressure, which you dial in. The pump automatically stops at the set point. The pressure hose is short, but the 12 Volt cord is long enough to reach any wheel on my Ridgeline, if routed through the appropriate window. There is a storage compartment for the DC cord, but you need some origami skills to get it back in there. There is an optional AC adapter, but it's expensive and hard to find. The pump can be run off a 20 Volt DWalt battery, a feature which is of no interest to me. I have no other DeWalt tools and no batteries. I can't imagine a battery being much use having been neglected in the trunk summer after winter after summer after winter... assuming the battery hadn't already exploded in my trunk . One other kudo. It runs on a 10 amp 12 V circuit. Some pumps pull 15 amps, but some cars only have 10 amp circuits. The pump is not cheap, but there's a lot of crap out there that costs half as much.
    1 point
  17. I am kind of late to the show David, but that came out real nice. It is nice that the sap wood ended up in front and showing. It's to bad the design didn't allow it to be a bigger part of the appearance.
    1 point
  18. I’d start a couple test pieces now so the finishes have some time to cure before you’re ready to use the method on the final piece.
    1 point
  19. Could be a lot of picture frame material in there. Spurtles galore. Might not be great for a table top but there’s plenty of other uses for it.
    1 point
  20. Got a little workout in moving drywall. It’s actually the second time I’ve moved all of it. This pic is only part of it, 50 sheets total.
    1 point
  21. I'd get some use out of it for random shop uses, jigs etc where stability isn't required. One could also make use of it in some circumstances for secondary bracing material again where stability isn't much of a concern. You could also use it for testing set ups or doing prototypes for ideas. It's not all wasted.
    1 point
  22. The shelving system compliments an already amazing set of components. I wish my hearing was still good enough to appreciate the sound as much as my vision appreciates the appearance!
    1 point
  23. I second Mark's comments above also the height of the structure will make heating it especially from anything on the sealing a tall order. Anyway to cut the space you want to heat? Either in height or dimensions? If cost is not an issue I would insulate the entire structure and look at options that would lower the heat source.
    1 point
  24. Is insulation for the walls a realistic consideration? It would have big benefits, including cutting down on BTU's needed.
    1 point
  25. 1 point
  26. Thanks, Coop! He listens to Christian music and a fair amount of acoustic music. It truly sounds like the artist is in the room playing a private concert - amazing sound, actually.
    1 point
  27. You may have just put Rockler out of the figure 8 business! The bowl looks fantastic!
    1 point
  28. CO2 pressure is determined by the ambient temp. If I recall, it is about 850 psi at 70*. The cylinder, like a CO2 fire extinguisher, is filled by weight and not pressure, thus no pressure gauge. As the ambient temp increases, so does the internal pressure, thus the reason for a regulator. The small cylinder that I mentioned on GMC vehicles was sized to inflate the tire without over inflation.
    1 point
  29. A much more family oriented version of what I said.
    1 point
  30. I’ve checked the windshield washer fluid in mine
    1 point
  31. I pumped up all four tires on my wife's electric car. She came home and announced that she had a low pressure warning on one tire, so I went out thinking another flat. But check the dashboard to see which one, and all four tires are down 3 or 4 pounds. Then it occurs to me, with an electric there's no oil to change, so no periodic service where someone checks her tire pressure, or brake fluid, or anything else for that matter. --duh. Guess I should check the onerous manual, though I doubt it even mentions that the car has brakes let alone where the fluid reservoir is.
    1 point
  32. Son in law and his brother came by and moved a couple of large metal cabinets for me. This one is an IBM mainframe tape reel storage cabinet. Notice the family resemblance? It now serves a higher purpose. On to cabinet number two . . .
    1 point
  33. Final fit check, need to fab up some cauls for glue up. For now, time to cut the grass
    1 point
  34. Glenn, is the floor space filling up pretty much as you expected? I’m pretty much a creature of habit in that when I put my machines in place, although all are on casters, they have stayed in their original position, moved only for cleaning then back again. The only exception is my drum sander on a cabinet that gets rolled around quite often to allow more room for longer pieces on my ts and to provide better access to my bs. In one of your pics above, I see the orientation of your drum sander next to your bs and I thought, that makes better sense. I just rotated my drum sander 90* and it gives me another 12” clearance to the infeed side of my bs and a complete clearance for longer cross cuts on my ts.! Wish you had built your new shop 10 years ago!
    1 point
  35. Here are a few more current pics of the sliding vice, the upper rabbit fits in a groove routered into the underside of the top. There is also a piece of angle iron up there to reinforce the front edge.
    1 point
  36. Thanks all! @pkinnebI can do better than that. Here's a link to the thread on a variation that I built for large or odd clamps. The originals are shown as well. There should be a SketchUp screen capture in there with dimensions. The arm spacing and length will vary with your clamps. I make mine so that they hold 90% of my clamp types. I'll see if I posted the original build here . . . Nope. Let me know if you need more info. Basically a 3/4" oak dowel acts as dowel nuts. A pilot hole is drilled and a long, high quality, wood screw is driven in. A second slightly shorter wood screw is piloted and screwed about 1-1/2" below the first to prevent twisting. Double head nails are cut short and inserted to keep things from lifting off the cleat. Unnecessary most places by I live in earthquake country. These have been holding heavy, heavy clamp loads for years of dynamic use without failure so I feel pretty confident about them. The modified version (three arms versus three pairs of arms) is for large head or wide bar clamps that do not fit the standard 3-pair of arms version. Their value will depend on your arsenal. Easily modified. The thing that pays off for me is a pretty standard width and height so things interchange nicely.
    1 point
  37. No, not my invention. When I built it in 2010 Roubo's were all the talk. I'm sure the idea came from either one of Schwartz's blog posts or the bench crafted site. The whole roller skate wheel thing on the bottom was me adapting cheap commercially available parts and shop made fixtures to duplicate the functionality that bench crafted was selling for several hundred dollars.
    1 point
  38. I love that look Ken. I actually really like the Mahogany as an accent. Don't think anyone would see that as a needed leg extension unless you told them. I'm hoping to use those plans eventually to build a porch swing for my new home. I have a beautiful view of Signal Peak (~10k ft mountain in SW Utah) from my front porch and want a swing or bench to sit in and enjoy. How were Cremona's videos? I've not ever used one of his projects.
    1 point
  39. It does sit well. The angle of the back and the arm rest height is just right. I used teak oil as a finish. I was afraid that if I added cypress as leg extensions, it would appear as a repair or after thought. With the darker wood contrast, maybe it looks more like an intended highlight ?
    1 point
  40. This was sent to me by @RichardA, who received it from Ronn Winkler, just to give credit where it’s due. It just too good not to share on here.
    1 point
  41. Well, I took these mullets to the mill today. One slab was sliced into 3 ea. 1” thick boards and the other into 1 ea. 1” and 1” 2 1/4” thick boards. There are more bad checks in each than even my ex wife could ever have written! So now, after paying the guy $50 to mill them for me, I have $200 of 90 bf of fire wood. After showing the pic to @chet, he suggested making 500 small boxes and as old as the wood is, I could immediately sell them as antiques. Misery loves company! I checked the mc when I got home and though it was 11%, the dust when milling looked like the powered snow that I once encountered while pheasant hunting in SD. Live and learn.
    0 points