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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/28/21 in all areas

  1. I was reading an old thread on another forum and someone had mentioned an assist tool made by Jet for loading drum sander paper. I had never heard of the JET 98-0060 Tuftool. I rarely have trouble with the Supermax 19-38 clip but was curious. Using the pictures in the manual as a reference I formed one up using some hard steel wire. I have some heavier wire I figured I would use if I could figure it out. Turns out the 18"-ish wire is plenty stout. The theory is that a little hook grabs the lever that folks with larger hands can have a hard time getting a hold of. You then pull up the lever which raises the clip lever and opens the clip. You then rotate the tool counter-clockwise so the horizontal bend is over the drum (also pinching the loose end of the paper if you like), and you can let go. This gives you two hands to finesse the end of the abrasive into the throat of the inboard clip. Once the paper is threaded you rotate the clip clockwise and release the tension allowing the clip to grab the abrasive. Disclaimer: I am no metal worker by any stretch . . . This will be obvious from looking at the pics. . . It only took a few minutes to bend the wire and it makes an already easy job (I have small hands) even easier
    4 points
  2. Yesterday, and today, I supervised a Cat 320 operator. I've been after heavy equipment contractors about getting a day's work for a large excavator for almost a year. They've either not wanted to bother with a small job, or were waiting for parts they couldn't get. Finally, one had an operator who wanted to work over Thanksgiving weekend, so he showed up at 2:30 yesterday, worked until dark, and came back this morning, quitting at 2:30 today. The Cat 320 weighs 27 tons. When it pulls on something, that something moves. I had some large stumps down on our point that I didn't want to take the time required with a small, rental unit. This guy pulled them right out. The 65 ton lowboy was as easy to load, and unload off of as my gooseneck trailer is. The front of the trailer stays attached to the Semi Tractor, and separates from the trailer, after lowering the front onto the ground. He unloaded, and loaded as fast as I can load my mower, or tractor on my gooseneck. He worked for 2-1/2 hours yesterday down on the point, getting up all the rest of the stumps, and taking down a few more trees I wanted to take out. Today, he dug up a mountain of topsoil that I'm going to get another guy to come screen with a big trommel dirt screen. I have a place I've been letting people dump leaves for 40 years, and dumping stuff I cleared off of lots when I was building houses. We dug a test hole, to see about how deep it is, and he couldn't hit bottom. It looks like it's over 8 feet deep, on average, over about 3/4's of an acre. He piled that up for me until he decided to quit. He might have dug up 25% of what I have. It's full of fat earthworms. I easily have enough, just from what he piled up today, to put 2 or 3 inches on the whole 2 acre point. That should grow grass. A single axle dump truck load of topsoil goes for $250. Judging by that, this is well over 25k worth. Not exactly what I wanted to be doing this weekend, but I was glad to get it done, finally.
    2 points
  3. I made a Packout add-on to carry my tracks. Loaded: Unloaded: The bottom piece has a hook that engages on the loop at the bottom of the Packout box:
    2 points
  4. No wonder that women think we're nutz.
    2 points
  5. In years of daily use, I have never seen a large piece of plywood kick. I push them squared behind the sheet. The cutoff is more likely to fly. In this circumstance, no single rule works for all situations. You have to know how much weight each piece has, and how much of the piece will be behind the blade by the time uplift forces will matter. If your fence clamps, you can put a down roller on it. With a riving knife, I have never seen a kicking concern. With a riving knife and guard, I have never seen an injury. (Just my experience. It could be done.) The pieces have to get small before I remove the guard. Only for special circumstances do I remove the knife.
    2 points
  6. Got the sled squared up at the 45* angle. Only went the wrong way once with adjusting it. Hinges also came in and I think they’ll work out nice. Glad that issue is resolved. I need to flatten the ~16” panels for the case as they’re slightly off and causing the test miters to be off in spots. Since I only have a 13” planer I’ll try sanding everything to flatten any inconsistencies out. Used a weight to keep the panels flat when I cut the test miters which seemed to help.
    2 points
  7. For a cut like that I’d have the fence on the right and stand to the left of the board so that I have easy access to the stop paddle. When the back edge of the board is nearing the blade, I pivot around enough that I can push through with my right arm (using push stick or block) without crossing over the blade but keep my body slightly left of the blade. Reaching over the fence isn’t ideal because you’re more likely to push the piece away from the fence and into the blade.
    2 points
  8. That is a nice little tool, my Jet 16-32 came with that little tool yours looks just as good. Being a guy with big ham hands I have trouble with getting that end on correctly I couldn't do it without the tool, just the cussing and swearing would be heard around the entire neighborhood
    1 point
  9. The safty point to stay between the blade and the work piece is interesting, I've never heard that one. I"m assuming it's to prevent someone from hitting their arm on the blade. I always position my left hip on the on off button which puts my body mostly out of the way of the blade and anything that might get kicked back. I also use push sticks not push paddles. I won't advise either way because everyone is different, use what feels safe and comfortable to you.
    1 point
  10. I used to have an infeed cart. Plywood went from the truck onto the cart. It could roll up to the front of the saw, and was just the correct height to match the saw top. A plywood sheet would go from the truck to the saw, and was ripped down to its needed size. It was used for some number of years, but we finally decided it took up more room than it was worth. Now, I rip full sized sheets by myself, including MDF. The important thing for me is having a good outfeed table, so it can lay right there after it goes through the saw. 4' x 7" is just a small piece. Hands Never go over, behind, or anywhere close to the blade. NEVER. Some sort of push stick/device gets used, unless a whole hand can pass well clear of the blade.
    1 point
  11. Was the workpiece 4 feet x seven inches? Or four feet x 7 feet? I'm confused about why the infeed stand was needed. In any case, I keep the blade to the minimum height needed, and a sacrificial wooden push block that I can run right across the blade. Stand left, fence right, reach across.
    1 point
  12. I would have to agree with all of above. And I have never used an in feed support. I try and rip the piece to a manageable size with a circ saw and finish it on the ts. An in feed support would just be an extra consideration when I need to be watching the piece against the fence while watching it thru the blade.
    1 point
  13. You stand where you have the most balance. You usually want your shoulder behind the piece to be cut.
    1 point
  14. Forgot about the infeed stand. For a ply piece like that, I wouldn’t use the stand. Hold from the left side toward the back 2/3-3/4 and walk it into the cut until it’s supported on the table and then feed through. If the piece is heavy enough that infeed support is needed, I’d still stay left and use a push stick long enough to complete the cut (but not necessarily clear the back of the blade) without getting too close to the blade, then immediately stop the saw and step back or continue holding the push stick on the work piece. Blade guide and riving knife dramatically reduce the chance of kickback and/or injury for cuts like this.
    1 point
  15. I'd be interested to hear what you learn.
    1 point
  16. Started submitting quote requests for solar panels for our house. Anyone on here have panels?
    1 point
  17. Ok, not exactly today, but a few weeks ago, I finally got part of my 2020 Christmas present. I or do Reed these in Feb. 2021 and they arrived Nov. 2021. According to their website, they will ship the chipbreakers that are part of the order on Feb. 26, 2022. Grumble. These irons and chipbreakers will complete the replacements in all my planes, except my #8 Stanley.
    1 point
  18. Project journals are pretty boring without pics. Here’s the table saw sled I put together the last couple of nights. Hopefully tonight or tomorrow morning I can square it up and be ready to make the cuts for the case. Also cleaned out the table saw since it was full of dust. The port at the bottom got clogged so hooking up the dust collector was even more pointless than normal.
    1 point