Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/24/21 in all areas

  1. Done with a day to spare! Thanks for everyone's help. In lieu of plywood, I went with frame and panel solid wood for the base, lid, and the tray base. Used dewaxed shellac as the finish. It really helped the figure in the maple stand out. Hope everyone has a good Christmas!
    5 points
  2. 4 points
  3. Here is my band saw follower. You may have noticed that I made the template to the actual dimensions, i.e. there’s no setback or offset for the follower pin. The last time I used the follower I ran into some problems, Even though everything seemed aligned the saw blade didn’t follow the follower. Two good cuts and two not so good. So as much as I would like to give it another try, I am reluctant to rely on it to cut to the target line. I am going to use the band saw follower and the ¾” Resaw King to make cuts that will actually be a quarter inch off the final line. This will remove a lot of the bulk, but also gives me an opportunity to see if the performance is different with a wider blade. I am also considering swapping out the wooden follower pin for one made from some tubing I have on hand (it looks like copper). To be really experiMENTAL about this I should also do some of the cuts with the ¼” blade; but let’s face it, who gets a kick out of changing band saw blades. To mark the target line I am going to use a different technique (which I claim to have invented). A little preamble. I have an accessory laser for the articulated arm hollowing rig. The laser attaches to a large T shaped holder. The upright of the T mounts to the “wrist” of the hollowing rig. The cross bar of the T then suspends the laser directly over the tool tip pointing straight down. When the tool tip is placed within a hollow form, the laser identifies the tool tip’s position relative to the side wall, thus aiding one in the hollowing operation. In other words, knowing where the tool is, hopefully you will not cut through the vessel’s wall. I figured out I could use much the same principle to transfer a 2D contour line onto a 3D surface. With the tool shaft in the hollowing rig I remove the cutter from the tool shaft. Then position the laser. The blunt tip of the tool shaft can then read the template and the laser projects the corresponding point onto the 3D surface. I make a dot under the laser beam with a pencil, then later connect the dots to mark the target line. Once I have the target line marked I will use a burr and sanding drum on a Dremel to remove the remainder of the waste wood and shape the edge. I will have to cut back the top edge before I can mark the bottom edge with the laser technique, so this will be two step process. We all know the part about not looking directly at a laser beam, but I have to say that wood is a surprisingly reflective material, and the graphite in a pencil, black though it may appear, is really quite reflective. I wear sunglasses for this operation, and not infrequently I double up. So, actually, don’t try this at home.
    3 points
  4. The one I am planning on building is called the Journeyman. It is designed with the machinist in mind. When done, I will probably give it to my one son in law who is a machinist.
    3 points
  5. Next up, I need to rough out the arms. After roughing it out on my bandsaw, I used my Bosch right angle grinder/sander with 50 grit to do most of the work. Also, my mini Porter Cable belt sander, various rasps, and my Festool orbital sander. i have a lot more rasping and sanding ahead of me to get these into their final shape.
    3 points
  6. Here’s an update: Blended the legs into the rails with a lot of craving and sanding. Again, I don’t have a power carver like a foredom, so this is a bit laborious, but still effective. It was mostly accomplished with a Flexcut carving tool, a saddle rasp, and good old fashioned sandpaper.
    3 points
  7. Its weird when the San Jose, CA is one of the colder places for Christmas, 50° expected. Merry Christmas and stay safe.
    2 points
  8. I'm kind of low on Bosch routers. Thanks for the alert.
    2 points
  9. I would either OD on caffeine or die from cancer from smoking 6 cigars a day before my 50th birthday if I were to attempt that!
    2 points
  10. Merry Christmas from Houston where we are expecting a record high of 83* and I just picked a 5 gallon bucket of fresh tomatoes.
    2 points
  11. I don't know if you have a shoe repair shop around but years ago I backed a electric pallet jack over my foot and it tore up the leather on the toe of my steel toe shoes and took it to my shoe repair to have it fixed and he used something to bond the patch to the steel. And yes, I was extremely happy to be wearing heavy steel toed shoes that day.
    2 points
  12. I’ve used Grestner hardware on this watch case, but only for the door that slides in the bottom of the case, high quality and I wouldn’t hesitate to use it again, another similar one is in my future so a journal of your build would be great @Chet
    2 points
  13. Why isn't there a Hate button? :-)
    2 points
  14. The kit is on sale too on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/BOSCH-1617EVS-Electronic-Fixed-Base-Router/dp/B00004TKHV/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?crid=HSFU72ZANU4E&keywords=bosch+router&qid=1640317538&sprefix=bosch+router%2Caps%2C60&sr=8-4
    1 point
  15. Hey fellow turners looking to purchase the Nova Galaxi 1644 does any one have feed back on this lathe ?
    1 point
  16. Check with @Mark J he would be our resident turner
    1 point
  17. I’m going to try and have a professional make the back and seat cushions. However, I will make the frames.
    1 point
  18. Bora also has a mobile base series that has all swivel wheels if you want them.
    1 point
  19. Shoe goo is what I have used. Find multiple places
    1 point
  20. This one fairly spectacular. The Sun had gone down, but like the last one I posted was reflecting off the clouds onto the water, but also shining through, and over the clouds. When you turned around facing the other way, there was a Rainbow going all the way over. Neither photos are anything like as spectacular as they were in person. Now, with the latest update to Windows 10, you can rotate a picture by right clicking on it, rather than having to import it into Photo Gallery. I rotated these four times to the right before I checked to see if they would come through right side up.
    1 point
  21. I would love to see the bid sheet for that commission, you would need a fat wallet to own that screen!
    1 point
  22. I would think the leather needs to be replaceable. I'd bond it to some thin ply, then screw that to the vise jaws.
    1 point
  23. I never use dimension wood, even if I buy it. My goal is to make the piece I size I want. When jointing two pieces together, you just do...... Don't weary about the size your wood is, just build you project. of course it have to be structurally strong, you just can't willy Nelly thought parts together........... Actually you can. Thomas
    1 point
  24. @Chet, I had to look Grestner up, but the company has some nice box designs. You just inspired me to add something like their EDC box to my bucket list!
    1 point
  25. @Coop, we have a good chance at a record high as well, but ours is in the low 70s. I'll take that over sleet and freezing rain, any Christmas!
    1 point
  26. Contact cement is a good choice.
    1 point
  27. I've used super 77 for binding leather to metal. It's basically spray contact cement.
    1 point
  28. Yeah the SS base is the best, but I don't know of an all purpose version. I have gone to using the Bora 3500 & 3550 bases. The wheels are bigger and wider so they roll better and the frames are stiff and don't sag.
    1 point
  29. You do not mention what tools you are planning to use to make the mortise and tenons. Laout would be different if done by hnad thatn if using, say, a router for the mortises. In general, If you wnat the tenon piece (like a table apron) to be flush with the mortised piece ( like a table leg) you would wnat to alyour out the joint from the face that is to be flush. Do the mortise first so that you can make adjustments to to the tenons as required. There is no reason that the mortise or t the tenon must be centered on either piece. I try to get my tenons centered if I can because with power tools its easier that way. If your pieces don't match the plan thickness - no problem - make a full scale drawing and work it out with your new dimension. Iven when I desigm my own projects the dimensions on my drawings seldom survive unchanged for very long. You can do it.
    1 point
  30. Finished sanding the insides and back panels. Just need to figure out the correct gap for the back panel and then I can start assembling it. Hopefully the case will be fully glued up on Christmas.
    1 point
  31. I completed the sanding and got a nice surface. I think the pointed inside waist line came out well, but time will tell. And with a MS wipe down In some ways it’s a shame that a lot of that beautiful grain pattern (and a lot of sanding effort) is going to be cut away, but next up is making the template to guide in removing that wood. To begin with I returned to Fusion 360, to work out some geometric details. The template is basically a four pointed star. The tip of each star meets the sides of the as yet un-cut basin at an angle. It’s convenient if that angle is a whole number of degrees, and after some minor tweaking 21* seemed to work without changing the location of the center apex. If you recall from the original drawings there is a “slit” in the waist line of the base, which I think will be an important design element. The center apex’s position determines the depth of that slit. Having worked out the geometry I printed a diagram. Since all four points of the star are the same I only had to depict one of them. Then square up a piece of plywood on the Incra, mark the diagonals and find the centers of both faces with a Starrett combination square. Find the cardinal lines, again using the combination square. Now mark off the position of the central apex and mark a line ¼” from the corner (including along the edge of the plywood). I made a discovery, a piece of ¾” ply fits perfectly between the fence rail and the table on my saw. Convenient for marking the edges. Carefully draw the line connecting the two points. Confirm the accuracy with a digital protractor. Rinse and repeat until all eight sides of the four points are drawn. Then do the same on the other face. At this point I have the cut lines drawn, but there was some debate in my head as to whether to cut the template out on the band saw or whether to use the table saw. I had recently made the 45* drilling cradle on the TS, so I new the trick is to flip the board from the A side to the B side between cuts so that two saw kerfs miss each other. I decided to go with the TS. The BS would make a prettier cut, but all my miter gauges fit little loose in the BS slots. I could (and should) fix that with a little shimming, then align everything carefully… Or I could go with the Incra that’s already set up and ready to go. I set the Incra to 21* and slid the fence far to the right. Then I used a stiff plastic ruler (non-conductive; it’s a SawStop) held along the flat of the blade and passing between the teeth to confirm the saw blade was aligned with the cut line and further confirmed the saw teeth would strike the cut line as well. Then switch on and cut carefully just the right distance Then flip the board over and repeat the operation on the B side. You’ll notice that the second cut was ever so slightly off the line. That is a simple graphic demonstration of the fact that the world is not perfect, hence my motto: Be as precise as you can, that way your mistakes will be more accurate. This is as good as it gets and I believe will be good enough. That operation gets repeated three more times, but the next cuts are a little tricky as some of the side is now missing. So now you see why the star pattern didn’t go all the way out the corner, but stopped ¼” short. First I like what that does for the base’s form, but it also insured there would be enough of a flat left to reference for the subsequent cuts. With the remaining cuts completed we have a star. Now the agonizing decision, do the triangle cutoffs go in the garbage or the scrap bin. Final step is to drill a clearance hole for ¼ x 20 machine bolt and a recess for the head and washer. The base piece is taken down from the lathe and removed from the screw chuck. The bolt passes through the hole in the template and up through the hole in the sacrificial block. And the two are secured tightly together. Recall that the screw chuck uses a 3/8” screw with a 5/16” clearance hole so the ¼ machine bolt has some wiggle room which allows me to correct any tiny misalignment. Which as you can see is pretty good. It also means that the screw chuck;’s threads don’t get chewed up. That’s ready for starting the cutback process, but I’m not, time to go watch TV.
    1 point
  32. Contact cement/ rubber cement should work fine.
    1 point
  33. I bet a hot glue gun would work. I obviously have been spending too much time in my wife’s craft building.
    1 point
  34. I have done some its kinds fun
    1 point
  35. Bora makes a few similar to the Grizzly one. Mine swivels on the front and the back wheels don’t. You have to lock the two front wheels individually but simple enough to do with your feet.
    1 point
  36. Consider that traditional hand tool M&T is cut with reference to one face or edge, therefore rarely 'centered'. By the same token, the mortise is generally sized to fit the chisel at hand, not the stock (within reason). I never go by joint dimension on a plan, even plans I drew myself. So long as the mating parts match, the actual dimension is all but irrelevant. The only critical dimensions on a plan are those in which modification would cause the overall piece to not fit its intended location, purpose, or structural integrity (objective), or those in which modifications would ruin the design aesthetic (subjective).
    1 point
  37. My thoughts exactly. I enjoy the patterns that can be designed and the ways you can use the panels in other projects. I have watch some video of Matt Kenney using jigs to cut up a bazillion little pieces that are needed and then paring them to size. I would think you would find the process tedious or cathartic not much in between.
    1 point
  38. If the material the mortise will be made into is the same thickness as the material you'll cut the tenon into. I'd just center both the mortise and tenon. If you are using a router for the mortise set your edge guide and reference both sides essentially cutting the mortise twice. One main hogging pass and the opposite side would just remove a tiny bit. Cut the tenon out by flipping the board over removing the same material from both faces equally. Tenons can be cut reference a band saw fence or with a tenoning jig on the table saw or a dado stack on the table saw. I prefer the dado stack as if you use a miter gauge you can both get a good clean square shoulder and a well fitting tenon with relatively little work. If your mortise is 0.2657438743" it doesn't matter it'll be centered. The tenon would than be made to fit, also centered.
    1 point
  39. If you’re attaching two pieces together of the same thickness it doesn’t matter where the mortise is, as long as it’s in the same spot in both parts. Also, mill up some extra pieces and test it.
    1 point