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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/16/22 in all areas

  1. Couple backorders were delivered on Friday!
    6 points
  2. The screw measures 26” long and is 2-1/4” in diameter and is accomplished from a solid 12/4 piece of walnut. The design is solely based on the concept of the Greek mathematician Archimedes (200 B.C.). Clamping material to the spline of the saw acts a depth stop therefor I can create a reference point when I begin carving. I used a flat chisel to remove the bulk of the material and creating a “V” shape. The “V” channel allowed room for the curved chisel to get in and begin the carving process. A SHARP scraper helps to remove material and is a gauge to assure the curve is uniform the whole of the spiral. The scraper first addresses the excavation in a skewed angle and is turned to the geometric center of the spindle as the proper radius has been achieved. Once the curve was attained, I then spun the cylinder on the lathe and used a block of wood and sandpaper to smooth away any of the chips on the edge of the carving. This was a very slow process and was tough on the hands and wrists.
    4 points
  3. Quick win project between rounds of playing in the snow with my kids. We recently upgraded my middle kid from a toddler bed to a twin bed. We found a decent used wood bed with drawers below. One of the center support/guides for a drawer was broken so I made a new one. It was a nice opportunity to try out my new shop layout and DC setup. Broken piece had some crazy grain. New one made from a scrap piece of maple. Edges eased with my little stanley. Then a quick coat of shellac and then wax. In place and back in service!
    4 points
  4. I enjoyed the 'major winter storm' that left the local grocery totally devoid of milk and bread before 9 am yesterday.
    4 points
  5. The brick pattern is segments of paduk with maple veneer replicating mortar in a masonry pattern. Cutting slices off the blocks which I glue up and alternating form one block to another and flipping and rotating the individual four-row sheets makes for a random placement of the grain color variations. The two rim gears are made from 24 pieces of quartersawn wenge in a three-layer bricking pattern making for a very stable plywood type of application. Cutting the involute teeth on the scroll saw then cleaning the saw kerf with a Grobert file went rather efficiently. I wrapped a piece of black palm in black dyed veneer then cut slices as if I were slicing lunch meat which created what I hoped would look like asphalt roof shingles. Then I put the roof onto a little shack made from yellow heart clapboard siding with holly trim and mahogany windows and entry door. The utility shack was made to hide a step motor from view. The inner gears which register the rim gear are maple with East Indian rosewood axles with ebony and yellow heart warning medallions. The other gears are shop fabricated quartersawn white oak gears of three layers with the center layer offset 90 degrees from the otter layers. The use of quartersawn material in the gear making will hopefully minimize the wood movement from making my circular gears into oval shapes. The back of the structure has a quarter-inch thick cherry burl book matched cherry ledge. The support structure of the “Gears for Spheres” apparatus is built using bubinga shop made plywood. The troughs are Honduran mahogany, and the hand sculpted gear loader is maple. The element sits I the M7 tiers attached to the tabletop with three brass screws. Before I get asked, yes it works exactly like it looks it should work.
    3 points
  6. It's been a long time since I made a new one. This week I spent some time making my second project. I used Badog CNC artisan 22, the one that my late grandfather gave when he was having his retirement in Switzerland. I am happy with the outcome and it leaves a great surface after using it. Seems gold to me and the experience is amazing. Any learnings you can give me, please do comment. I am really new with all of this stuff, I did some study with some experts, and I'm in need of your ideas and learning you can impart. Thank you!
    2 points
  7. We only got an inch of snow, followed by maybe a few tenths of freezing rain, but now the temp is 33 and raining, so it's getting dissolved. We planned for it. One reason I'm still driving a 21 year old truck is that our vehicles never go on the road when there is salt on them. I drove out to the highway Thursday, planning to go somewhere, but saw the lines of brine on the road, so I turned around and came back in. We have two litters of puppies 8 weeks old today, so we've had plenty of entertainment. We produced 43 puppies last year, and looks like this year will probably follow in the same footsteps. This is their inside play area. They're good entertainment for my almost 106 year old Mother, who also lives with us. After 8 at night, soon after my Mom goes to bed, the puppies get to run loose in the house with us. Wheelchair wheels are too dangerous for the little ones. There hasn't been an accident on the floor since just before they were 6 weeks old. After starting a batch of 15 last time, having only 6 is easy.
    2 points
  8. Just a clue, it is part of a larger project.
    2 points
  9. You really can use a variety @Chet, depending on which lure you are making and what you want it to do. Lighter woods give more floatation and in some respects more action to a lure. Surface lures are often cedar or pine. I used paulownia (left over from surf board builds) for a lot of my lighter surface lures and weighted them. The big time makers swear by Alaskan White Cedar. Maple and birch are common more dense woods used, these are for lures you want to work below the surface, from there you weight them appropriately depending on the desired action. I used maple for quite a few and am trying some cherry also, alittle less dense than maple so it should have a little more floatation. I plan to move into some lipped lures next, studying those now, they are alittle more difficult, where and how much you weight them is critical. Since these are used in the surf you are really not looking to get a lot of depth, action of the lure is more key. With surface lures the way it sits in the water, depending on where and how you weight them, is also key. Here's a how to article from a plug maker, I'm making a bunch of these, it's pretty interesting and you can follow the process; https://www.thefisherman.com/article/plug-building-1-the-habs-needlefish/ And here's a link to a page with a bunch of builds; https://www.thefisherman.com/category/plug-lure-building/
    2 points
  10. I'm as crazy about surf fishing as I am about woodworking. This winter I decided I would make a bunch of Classic Striper Coast surf lures, what better way to join together 2 hobbies. So after a bunch of research I got started and now I'm addicted. A lot of these classic wooden lures sell for $20 plus, and there is a growing group of independent producers cropping up all along the Northeast Coast. I don't plan to sell anything, but my fishing buddies are super excited that I plan to share my creations. Here are some classic designs, the Habs Needlefish, the Canal Hawg and a new classic the 2T Pencil; Some more Canal Hawgs, 2T Pencils and smaller Albie Pencils; A small school of Squids waiting to be employed; And finally, a production line started; So production starts with the design, then make a turning blank, thru drill that and then turn. Drill out you holes for hooks and weights. A dip in wood sealer, paint, coat of epoxy and then put together. It is very addicting!
    2 points
  11. I am posting this, not so much to share the experience, as to collect advice as I go. My son asked for a case to display his collection of pocket knives. We decided on a wall mount, with a hinged, glass-front door. Acrylic, probably, not window glass. Anyway, I'm sort of winging it beyond those basic parameters. We're experimenting with how to hold the knives. First test is a standardized block of MDF, with a cut-out to hold each knife. To begin, I made a field-expedient scribing tool to help trace the outline. A carpenter pencil, shaved to the lead on one edge, and set into a groove at the end of a squared block puts the line directly along the edge of the knife profile. The outline traced, and max dimensions marked for the block. Several minutesof scrollsaw work later, and we have a holder. Even vertical, the knife won't fall out. Mostly because I cut it tight around the handle, but I also put a 2 degree slope in the cut, so gravity would drive the knife inward. Frankly, I don't think that made any difference. He wants to display 24 knives, and wall space dictates 2 colums of 12. At 8.75" long and 2.25" tall for each block, that makes the overall size of the case around 20" wide by 28" tall. Final depth TBD but will include an integral hanging cleat. Could be as thin as 2", but likely will be a little deeper. Ayone have thoughts on this approach?
    1 point
  12. I received the last couple of pieces for my no router table top and fence.
    1 point
  13. Tired of harrassing the electrons that make up my CAD model, I decided to work with actual wood today. Cody wants to use the "cross tie" he got from @Spankya while back. This is a 9"x7"x8' maple cant. Thanks to Spanky's excellent job of cutting, it remained fairly straight, with just a bit of twist. These cheap Swanson cutting guides make very good straight edges and winding sticks. Cody didn't get away scott-free, I "encouraged" him to help square a reference corner on the cant. He didn't last long, but I don't blame him. I'm 6" taller and 100lb heavier, and was still quite tiring to hand plane so high up. Eventually, we got the first face flat and straight. On the adjacent 'edge', I used a circular saw and guide to establish a square corner. Unfortunately, that still left about 4.5" of wonky material. I found the kerfing across every few inches and hacking the waste out with a chisel went fairly quick. Only 6 more feet to go! Spanky, if you are reading this, know that I owe you one....
    1 point
  14. I’m just planning to let it melt away, but we don’t have much that we need to leave the house for. My wife did pass on her shift tonight, but they had more staff on shift tonight than usual and the weather means not many people are walking through the ER doors. I did cut up a horse stall mat to make a soft blade to clear our road (not state maintained, half mile long) if it sticks around too long or if the neighbors have trouble getting out. We don’t get enough snow around here to justify a snow blade or blower.
    1 point
  15. Yeah, that "major " storm that was supposed to hit last night, finally showed up at 1 PM this afternoon, after 8 hours of rain. Middle Tennessee stores were overcrowded, yesterday morning, and the store help was shopping elsewhere.
    1 point
  16. I have five children and there have been no chalk outlines of any bodies so far, so patience has been a big part of my life. :)
    1 point
  17. Yep, that's the idea. I've been working on the drawing a bit, maybe tomorrow I'll have the cometed 3D model to show.
    1 point
  18. Or maybe a strip of leather with a small piece of Velcro on the underside on the handle piece?
    1 point
  19. So will the dt’s be loose enough to allow you to slide the two pieces to accommodate replacing and adding different size knives?
    1 point
  20. Drew, I love the appearance of the ray fleck, but if this were a piece for sale, or a commission, I would avoid that stick for its lack of uniformity. Its a big risk any bits that stand out will be loved or hated by the client. If YOU are the client, then only you (and Megan) can decide.
    1 point
  21. More progress and a question. I got the other side assembly glued. Below is a picture of the space balls glued into the groove with CA glue. I also used the little LN plane i bought recently to add some chamfer details to the legs. The tool is a joy to use, and it also gets quite a bit of interest from non-woodworkers. The panel for the 2nd side turned out much better than the first. Below the left side assembly is the most recent one who's grain I feel looks better. It incorporates some sapwood but I think that could look interesting in time. This will likely be the side of the dresser that won't be directly against a wall in it's initial home. So now my question. You may need to reference the design. I have some stock for the front dividers that is a perfect use here as it will present very strait grain. They are also off cuts so it's also a way to eliminate material from the shop. However because they are almost perfect quarter sawn cherry there will be some cherry ray fleck, see below. The ray fleck isn't super consistent, so that said would it look odd or bad for the divider material to have some of that ray fleck present. I did my best to highlight the grain so you can see what I'm talking about in the images below but on the whole it does blend well. I'm asking for the higher level woodworker opinion. I know that 99.9% of people won't notice, but at this point I don't know if the client the dresser is intended for will have a discerning eye or not.... Personally I'm on the fence. I think it looks awesome but the uneven nature leads me to 2nd guess my self.
    1 point
  22. I think the only way I could cut that straight with a hand saw would be with a guide board, maybe two, one on each side of the saw.
    1 point
  23. So, I've been mulling this over, and I think the cut-out pocket idea isn't the way to go. He will want to cycle through the collection and carry one or the other at random, plus he may do some trading along the way. So a system that holds the knives securely, doesn't obscure them on display, and allows for easy removal, replacement or re-arrangement is in order. In short, a peg board, but better looking. Here is what I came up with, driven largely by the need to mill parts using primarily my table saw. First, the "peg" to rest the blade on - This shape is relatively easy to cut on the TS, although for maximum strength, I will first need to construct a blank, similar to a cutting board, to re-orient the grain correctly. The result looks like this: The pocket is to receive a small magnet, which will help secure the blade against the peg. The other peg profile is slightly different to accommodate the thickness of the grip. You might guess from the hooks, a DT slat wall is needed. Slat profile like so... These will be trapped against the back of the enclosure by side rails, but remain loose so they can be removed at will. The slat angle matches the peg DT angle (8 deg. in this sketch), although the actual angle isn't critical. The parts go together thusly: So we can have a good 24 place-holders in a reasonable cabinet size, arranged in 2 columns. The "pegs" slide side-to-side to allow knives of various lengths, and also allow multiple blades to be displayed. Here is a final representation with a crudely-drawn knife in place. Now to design an enclosure around the "slat wall" system.
    1 point