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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/17/22 in all areas

  1. This will be my last update for about 2 months. My upholsterer told me that he would be ready for my project towards the end of February. I also just finished a matching ottoman. I figured a lounge chair would be even more comfortable with a foot rest. I just need to put on a finish coat of Polyx. I have one coat of Extra Thin on it now. I think the ottoman will give additional leeway for those with varying heights where they now do not have to place their feet on the floor. It should certainly be more comfortable. Finally, I included the fabric/color that I choose. See you in about 2 months, I hope.
    7 points
  2. I received the last couple of pieces for my no router table top and fence.
    6 points
  3. These darn nationwide supply shortages are really affecting us. My snow blower has seen it’s last days and I can’t find one around here anywhere!
    4 points
  4. Got some more time in the shop today... A few shots of the main tools I use for shaping Also these new vices are really handy for this project being able to move the chair position without actually un clamping it is very nice. Sometimes holding parts on one end with my chest First up today was to rough out the remaining joints on the base Then with some scraps from the bent lamination back slats I started working through the process off how to cut them to the right length QUESTION: In another post earlier this week I believe it was @Ronn W on veneer holes there was a discussion about using coffee grounds with epoxy to fill holes. I was think of trying that technique out on this: It's about 1/8" hole about 1/4" deep what do you think? How do you do it just mix them in and go? Thanks!
    4 points
  5. Don't worry, your new one will break in approximately 18 months.
    3 points
  6. I've never even seen a snow blower, but talking about things getting old and playing out, our microwave quit yesterday. I think it's the only one we've ever had. Pam was a bit miffed that it stopped working, but I looked at the label on the door, and it said 1986. I told Pam that I didn't think it owed us anything else, and that it had been a good one.
    3 points
  7. Quick win project between rounds of playing in the snow with my kids. We recently upgraded my middle kid from a toddler bed to a twin bed. We found a decent used wood bed with drawers below. One of the center support/guides for a drawer was broken so I made a new one. It was a nice opportunity to try out my new shop layout and DC setup. Broken piece had some crazy grain. New one made from a scrap piece of maple. Edges eased with my little stanley. Then a quick coat of shellac and then wax. In place and back in service!
    3 points
  8. Thank you for your appreciation. I am planning to sell some stuff someday. For now, I am in the moment of learning step by step in woodworking and maybe in the future, 3D printing. I am just thankful my grandpa left me this Badog CNC machine. It gives me joy to work some stuff and most of all with this machine, I feel like he is beside me teaching me new things about CNC milling & guiding me. If you have any idea what's best to sell, would love to hear your thoughts. Thank you very much, I appreciate your time so much.
    2 points
  9. Went to the musical Come from Away last night. It was one of the best musicals I've been to. If that's your type of thing and you get the chance to go I recommend it.
    2 points
  10. And probably keep you awake at night.
    2 points
  11. I don't drink coffee either. I snagged a big filter full from work, and let them dry well before mixing into epoxy. I suspect using wet grounds would go cloudy or something.
    2 points
  12. Not weather related but we’ve had a sofa on order since July and a cooktop since October. We were looking at 8mo for the oven we want but my wife found maybe the only place in the country that had a couple in stock so that’s actually in transit now. I don’t have much time to run a bigger circuit for the new oven (going from single to double). Might have to hire it out but we already spent more on the oven itself than we had planned to spend on all new kitchen appliances combined.
    2 points
  13. If you make some lipped lures share. I could easily get into this. I'd probably try and make shad style lures, which aren't expensive but home made sounds like a lot more fun.
    2 points
  14. The brick pattern is segments of paduk with maple veneer replicating mortar in a masonry pattern. Cutting slices off the blocks which I glue up and alternating form one block to another and flipping and rotating the individual four-row sheets makes for a random placement of the grain color variations. The two rim gears are made from 24 pieces of quartersawn wenge in a three-layer bricking pattern making for a very stable plywood type of application. Cutting the involute teeth on the scroll saw then cleaning the saw kerf with a Grobert file went rather efficiently. I wrapped a piece of black palm in black dyed veneer then cut slices as if I were slicing lunch meat which created what I hoped would look like asphalt roof shingles. Then I put the roof onto a little shack made from yellow heart clapboard siding with holly trim and mahogany windows and entry door. The utility shack was made to hide a step motor from view. The inner gears which register the rim gear are maple with East Indian rosewood axles with ebony and yellow heart warning medallions. The other gears are shop fabricated quartersawn white oak gears of three layers with the center layer offset 90 degrees from the otter layers. The use of quartersawn material in the gear making will hopefully minimize the wood movement from making my circular gears into oval shapes. The back of the structure has a quarter-inch thick cherry burl book matched cherry ledge. The support structure of the “Gears for Spheres” apparatus is built using bubinga shop made plywood. The troughs are Honduran mahogany, and the hand sculpted gear loader is maple. The element sits I the M7 tiers attached to the tabletop with three brass screws. Before I get asked, yes it works exactly like it looks it should work.
    1 point
  15. I shoveled the walk this morning. Just straight slush. Very strange to have the temperature rise 10*+ over night. Yesterday I got some work done on my TV Stand and helped a neighbor and his son on a pinewood derby car. His son didn't seem into at all to start, but he perked up and told his mom all the tools he got to use.
    1 point
  16. Yes, like Ross said. I'm told you van also use new dry grounds. Paul if you have a spare bit of the wood, drill a hole and fill it with the mix. When it cures sand it smooth and see for yourself. The grounds won't sand as smooth as the epoxy, but that's a bigger issue for me than it may be for you. Some other caveats (which you may already knowl: If you need a dam to hold the epoxy in place, I used hot melt glue. I've seen people use various tapes, too. You probably want an epoxy pour that fills the cavity, so air bubbles don't show. A less viscous mix might be better, but if you drill a couple of test holes you can try different viscosities. To get rid of air bubbles you can use a hair dryer, or judicious application of a heat gun.
    1 point
  17. 1 point
  18. So let them dry out first? just in a filter thing? I don't drink coffee so not positive how that works.
    1 point
  19. I hear you mine is 28 years old and having issues. I have had one on order with Lowes since thanksgiving
    1 point
  20. Smart *** Coop, keep it up and I’ll send some sub zero temps your way
    1 point
  21. Fine, dry grounds mixed in clear epoxy will turn that little divit into a very convincing 'bark inclusion'. I just mix in the grounds until the epoxy has an almost dough-like consistency.
    1 point
  22. Tired of harrassing the electrons that make up my CAD model, I decided to work with actual wood today. Cody wants to use the "cross tie" he got from @Spankya while back. This is a 9"x7"x8' maple cant. Thanks to Spanky's excellent job of cutting, it remained fairly straight, with just a bit of twist. These cheap Swanson cutting guides make very good straight edges and winding sticks. Cody didn't get away scott-free, I "encouraged" him to help square a reference corner on the cant. He didn't last long, but I don't blame him. I'm 6" taller and 100lb heavier, and was still quite tiring to hand plane so high up. Eventually, we got the first face flat and straight. On the adjacent 'edge', I used a circular saw and guide to establish a square corner. Unfortunately, that still left about 4.5" of wonky material. I found the kerfing across every few inches and hacking the waste out with a chisel went fairly quick. Only 6 more feet to go! Spanky, if you are reading this, know that I owe you one....
    1 point
  23. I enjoyed the 'major winter storm' that left the local grocery totally devoid of milk and bread before 9 am yesterday.
    1 point
  24. Couple backorders were delivered on Friday!
    1 point
  25. I have five children and there have been no chalk outlines of any bodies so far, so patience has been a big part of my life. :)
    1 point
  26. Just a clue, it is part of a larger project.
    1 point
  27. That's a great piece of doll furniture. Are you planning on selling these?
    1 point
  28. Our house was built in 1994 with Andersen throughout. They still look great and operate flawlessly. No idea what line they are but I have the construction drawings and a big pile of documents and photos from when the previous owners built the house that will probably say.
    1 point
  29. Well I know way back people used to “ shave” or file the edges of coins and so the ridges let you know the coin hadn’t been shaved, I don’t know about pennies or nickels but you have my attention
    1 point
  30. Thank you. Honestly, I thought seriously about your suggestion. However, the through-style of the backrest had me a little concerned. I made the seat cushion in my Maloof horn back chair and it looks good, but it is not that comfortable. I will need to have it redone.
    1 point