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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/18/22 in all areas

  1. Circling back to close this customer designed, horse tack, shadow box. Being picked up tomorrow. Open areas at top and center are for an embroidered team name tag off of a riding vest and some awards.
    7 points
  2. I cut out the boards for the moveable shelves ... nothing exciting, just boards milled 6 square ... but a great excuse to use the new shooting board Then there was no putting off the glue-up much longer ... And finally the moment of truth ... does it fit in the door-frame ... yes!
    6 points
  3. We tested yesterday and just were notified that both my wife and I are positive. We both have had sinus symptoms for the last 2-3 weeks and feel no different than before. Not proof positive that the two shots and and the booster helped but .......!
    3 points
  4. Not really any tuning, but lubing, and installing a table lift. I bought this lift system off ebay years ago. I have two Powermatic 1150's. One a belt changer, and the other a Reeves drive. I put off deciding which one to put the lift on, but the Reeves drive requires some work if I let it set for a long time. This old belt changer is 100% reliable, and really is easy to change the belt on, so I decided to get this one going. I have a strong rope attached to a chain that I use the loader to lift some things. I tied the rope around the column. The hard part was getting the base off. I ended up ruining a HF 4 pound dead blow hammer, but did get it off. To get the base back on, I used the dead blow hammer to lean against a cribbing block, and a 10 pound sledge hammer. The bigger hammer worked. Serial number lookup says it was made between 1964 and 68, and I don't think the base has ever been off of it. I thought about taking the column all the way off, and soaking it in rust remover, but I'm fixing it because I need to use it, so don't have time to worry about cosmetics. It spins dead true, and I can change the belt position in less than 30 seconds without getting in a hurry. The table lift is slow, but smooth and accurate. I think it will be easier to use it for adjusting some hole depths than the limit stop, which is in itself one of my favorite things about this beast. I don't know how much it weighs, but it's more than it looks like. I bought it from a school auction in 1975 that I also brought an 8" jointer home from. I've used it that long without a table lift mechanism, but it will finally be a pleasure to use it like this. I have a Lee Valley table coming for it. I didn't want bright red or blue, and I like the LV fence. No time to make one.
    2 points
  5. Ken, you've seen mine, it's the HF 1 1/2 DC and as you know it's ducted to the outside. So my set up wouldn't work for you, and I'm using 4" piping at a 9 ft ceiling. However it works well at all 5 stations.
    2 points
  6. FYI Oneida still provides free ductwork design with the purchase of a collector I just got an email on it
    2 points
  7. The back is half inch Baltic birch ply with some canvas glued to it. There are small holes drilled through in inconspicuous places that allow pieces of wire to be threaded through and around the items that are mounted. Where the wires come through the back of the board they are twisted, pressed flat, and covered with tape similar to that you use to seal the back of a picture frame although just small squares. There are then bumpers on the back that hold the back panel about a 1/16" from the wall so that the wires have clearance. The hanging method is keyhole slots. Essentially the backboard mounts to the wall with the keyhole slots and has a French cleat profile along the top edge. The shadowbox has a matching French cleat profile at the top rear and simply hangs in place covering the backboard and becoming flush to the wall. I put an 1/8" chamfer profile all around the back to create a shadow line. This will make any inconsistencies in the wall where it is hung less obvious. This is really a much more “crafty” type project than I generally do. It was done per a supplied general design (pretty much a doodle on the back of a napkin ) and as a favor. It did give me an excuse to try out the veneering vac and bag so it was a win-win.
    2 points
  8. @Coop, sorry to hear about your positive test and the need for isolation. But it's good to hear you are not terribly symptomatic. ...and that is the shots working for you .
    2 points
  9. I know several people who went with the Super Cell and like it. I couldn't give you any specifics, but I have not heard them voice any complaints. I have a Laguna P-Flux 3, and I think it was a good trade off of cone separator performance and height. At this point in my life I never want to face having to get 50 gallons of sawdust out of the basement, so a smaller bin is fine with me.
    2 points
  10. I have the Oneida Gorilla Pro. I think it's a great collector and I highly recommend it BUT, I think the clear vue CV1450 represents a better bang for your buck. The collector I own is nearly double the CV1450. The Oneida Gorilla pro is 7' 10" tall with a 35 gallon bin, and let me tell you a 35 gallon bin fills quickly. If the Pro is to expensive the Oneida V3000 is cheaper and has very similar specs. It's just plastic body instead of metal which i don't think is a bad thing. I don't personally feel that there is much need to go above the CV 1450 or 3HP Oneida for a 1 man shop. Both of these collectors are capable of collecting from 2 tools at the same time. I don't know about you but I can only run 1 tool at a time. That said if I'm moving between 2 tools quickly, like the band saw and jointer, I'll leave both gates open. Both collectors give you that ability. There is also the Oneida SuperCell and I know nothing about it.... All the other collectors like Grizzly and Laguna will work but they have their drawbacks. Primarily it's a short cyclone that will lead to faster filter loading and require more filter cleanings. I ran plastic SDR 35 pipe and it works well. It'd be awesome to have that expensive fancy metal pipe but I'm set up and running.
    2 points
  11. I hope that the symptoms stay mild for ya. I believe that the shots are helping people have mild symptoms and recover faster. Megan and I both visited a friend who tested positive 2 days after our visit. Neither of us got it.
    2 points
  12. I bought 150 BF of all sap Hard Maple direct from a company that handles everything from felling to selling. I've noticed that variation in color in hard maple. I have a feeling it's a combination of different trees growing in slightly different conditions. It could be the time of year the tree is cut down. It could even be where the board is located in the trunk of the tree. This happens in all species. It's even more prominent in species like Walnut or Cherry where their color can vary drastically board to board within the same tree even. Some of the trees that I've milled have had different color from one side of the log to the other.
    2 points
  13. I would guess that the odd boards are from a different variety of maple. At the very least, from a different tree, as growing conditions from one tree to another often lead to color variance. That is why makers of fune furniture often purchase direct from the sawyer, to ensure the stock used for a project all cimes from the same tree. Such minor color variance can be almost impossible to see in the rough, so following the 'chain of custody' is your best bet. To ensure your stock is the same species, at least, you can refer member @phindsweb site for detailed images and descriptions. Hobbithouseinc.com
    2 points
  14. Optical illusion :-). Just random chance that I caught that angle with the camera. It is about 4 inches deep inside, 5 inches overall.
    2 points
  15. You can walk it up, and down the column. I didn't measure the range of motion, but probably one foot.
    1 point
  16. I have a question about finishing some boards and tips for the future. The photos below show some hard maple that I am using for the bottom shelf of my bench. It is not important for this build, but the outside boards have a light red color as compared to some of the other boards. The finish I am using is just an oil varnish (Tried and True Varnish Oil). To be honest I cannot remember what these boards looked like before I started and if there were some clues to this red color. It does not matter for this project, but I can see on some projects you might not want these different colors next to each other in a panel or adjacent parts. Is there something to keep an eye out for as you layout parts that might hint to the color of the boards as you finish them or stain them after the build? I assume this might also change based on the wood type you are using for the project. Thanks for any thoughts or tips.
    1 point
  17. I got this idea from fine woodworking a long time ago. The bracket on the wall is oak the thickness of the pipes. The oak is cut on a slight angle so with a heavy load it deflects to level. The oak is sandwiched by 2 x 4's. The top bolts go through the concrete blocks. The rest are lagged in. I have had all spaces completely loaded. The pipes are 24" plus and I have loaded it slightly beyond the 24 inches. Not as quick and easy as the KV's but it will hold more.
    1 point
  18. I have the Jet that includes the Vortex cone separator. No issues in the last 2 years and works as a DC should.
    1 point
  19. Thanks for the insight! I know this can cause issues when building a project but the “mysterious” properties of wood is part of what draws me to woodworking. One of my favorite parts is taking a rough cut board and milling it down to find the surprises hiding inside and how I can make them work with the overall project.
    1 point
  20. Oneida Dust Gorilla 15 years ish and still going strong. No regrets I would absolutely buy again. I like that it just works they also have a design service so that you can get things plumbed right (or at least they used to) the bin level indicator light in the shop is an added bonus. The only downside is its loud if I had to do again I would put it in a closet like @gee-dubdid in his new shop.
    1 point
  21. Steel Collection Drum – Clear Vue Cyclones the diagram in the assembly instructions says 95.5 inches 20 gal drum
    1 point
  22. They have height requirement diagrams on their web site. Varies with the size of collecting drum. I'll try to find it
    1 point
  23. So I have an older ClearVue setup. 5hp, 16 inch impeller. 6 inch PVC ducting all the way to the jointer, planer, Saw Stop, and both bandsaws. Changed the ports on the planer and jointer to 6 inch. Changed the port on the Saw Stop to 5 inch below, and 4 inch over the blade. Both bandsaws have 2 4 inch pickups. Only the sanders have single 4 inch. Router table has 2 4 inch pickups. Overall, very pleased with the system. Did add the collection bin sensor. Over filling the collection bin is a major PITA. One of the few purchases I have made that I have not wondered if I could have done better
    1 point
  24. I've never even seen a snow blower, but talking about things getting old and playing out, our microwave quit yesterday. I think it's the only one we've ever had. Pam was a bit miffed that it stopped working, but I looked at the label on the door, and it said 1986. I told Pam that I didn't think it owed us anything else, and that it had been a good one.
    1 point
  25. Yes, like Ross said. I'm told you van also use new dry grounds. Paul if you have a spare bit of the wood, drill a hole and fill it with the mix. When it cures sand it smooth and see for yourself. The grounds won't sand as smooth as the epoxy, but that's a bigger issue for me than it may be for you. Some other caveats (which you may already knowl: If you need a dam to hold the epoxy in place, I used hot melt glue. I've seen people use various tapes, too. You probably want an epoxy pour that fills the cavity, so air bubbles don't show. A less viscous mix might be better, but if you drill a couple of test holes you can try different viscosities. To get rid of air bubbles you can use a hair dryer, or judicious application of a heat gun.
    1 point
  26. Tired of harrassing the electrons that make up my CAD model, I decided to work with actual wood today. Cody wants to use the "cross tie" he got from @Spankya while back. This is a 9"x7"x8' maple cant. Thanks to Spanky's excellent job of cutting, it remained fairly straight, with just a bit of twist. These cheap Swanson cutting guides make very good straight edges and winding sticks. Cody didn't get away scott-free, I "encouraged" him to help square a reference corner on the cant. He didn't last long, but I don't blame him. I'm 6" taller and 100lb heavier, and was still quite tiring to hand plane so high up. Eventually, we got the first face flat and straight. On the adjacent 'edge', I used a circular saw and guide to establish a square corner. Unfortunately, that still left about 4.5" of wonky material. I found the kerfing across every few inches and hacking the waste out with a chisel went fairly quick. Only 6 more feet to go! Spanky, if you are reading this, know that I owe you one....
    1 point