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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/19/22 in all areas

  1. If there is one item in the shop I could dump money on to improve, it would be the dust removal system.
    5 points
  2. I've had HF and I have a fancy expensive system. My only regret is not getting the fancy system sooner. Shop is cleaner, house is cleaner, I can work with out a dust mask. It's amazing how much more enjoyable the hobby is when your space is clean. At least it is for me. Yeah it's expensive but all things considered my tools have already paid for them selves 2X over and I have the value of a new car invested in my tools.
    4 points
  3. Most people on this forum are hobbyists. That means that the goal is not always "getting by," but for some it's enjoying the process and the interaction with the tools. I "get by" with my HF DC, but my next tool purchase will likely be a better one. Better DC = less sawdust and fine particulates in the air = healthier lungs, less cleanup, and fewer sawdust boogers. Cost/benefit analysis is different for everyone.
    4 points
  4. Time flies eh? Insulation I got one completed quote for spray foam insulation, which was unsurprisingly a kick to the wallet. Getting the whole shop up to residential insulation (R38ish in the ceiling, 21 in the walls) came in at a solid $21k. If I did just the ceiling and reduced the spray thickness it's only $7.5k, which is still my entire on-hand cash reserve for getting the shop up to snuff. Still waiting on two more quotes to come in. One company will be giving me both spray and batting options, the other only batting. I'm resigned to probably doing the walls myself again, and putting the real money into the ceiling and other parts of the shop. Lighting and Electrical I got the new LED lights up on one side of the shop, and man it's a night-and-day difference. I've already ordered more lights to put up on the second set of trusses. The placement of the two overhead fans isn't ideal, or even, but after some trial-and-error I'll stick with 4x4ft sections on each end of each truss, for 16 lights front-to-back in the main shop area. I'm still going to experiment with adding some hanging fixtures (I've got 4 extra of these lights) to fill in any dim areas like the center or over tools. There's a bit of a shadow from the garage door bars, but it's mostly in a part of the shop that's not currently earmarked for anything, so I'm not going to worry about it for the moment. Worse case I add a platform 18" down from the truss and have one lower set of lights. These Barrinas are nice and bright and definitely a higher-quality overall than the Feits I was using in my old shop. They're clear-covered, so if you look at them you can see individual spots... But I wouldn't recommend looking directly at them anyways. The manufacturer/brand has a similar light with about half the lumen density and a frosted cover which I'll be using in the upper loft area since there's not enough headroom not to have the lights directly in your line of vision. The rolling scaffold on the left is a godsend, especially for someone (me) whose not a fan of ladders. I've been bolting it to the walls for some extra rigidity, and use a 2x10x8 on-edge bolted to the narrow end when working in the middle of the shop. It's been working great and I highly recommend getting one if you've got tall ceilings. The whole thing breaks down flat if I ever need to store it. Structure Had to happen eventually, and I can't say I was surprised by what I found behind the old interior plywood sheeting. I mentioned that this place was a dog-training facility before I bought it, and well, the mice definitely appreciated a steady source of food and bedding material. Looks like they were using the wiring holes as a super-highway to get into the cavities in the walls. I think every single sheet I pulled down had at least a small nest. No evidence of live rodents though, which is interesting. Given that I only sealed up the exterior holes recently, I assume the prior owner used something to get rid of them. Poison would be a bad idea with all those dogs around, but who knows. Either way I shoveled and shop-vac'd up a lot of nests and mummified mice. There's a little mold on the inside of one wall, but on the whole everything looks to be in good shape. I need to silicone up some nail-holes on the exterior siding, but that's about it. Weatherizing/Heating I've gotten all the major holes in the walls filled up, and most of the cracks I can see light coming through. Got the garage door tracks re-aligned to the openings, though they're not as smooth to open now, and only have a couple more pieces of vinyl to install to get them fully air-sealed. The shop is already a lot more pleasant to work in, especially after I added a 5000W electric heater. Cheap to buy and expensive to run, but this thing really helps take the edge off. I don't trust it unattended, but with just a few minutes it'll get the air temp up 3-5 degrees, and I already had an RV outlet for it. All told I've got about 8000W of electric heat spread around the shop right now. Not a great long-term solution, but good enough to get moving forward. A little mystery While working in the attached lumber shed, I walked over a hollow-sounding section of gravel. Childhood stories of buried treasure (or bodies) racing through my mind, I pulled back the rocks and this is what I found. I can't figure out what these rotted old timbers would have been for. The slab/skirt of the garage itself seems to run right past them. There is an older concrete slab a little beyond the edge of the woodshed, but they don't connect, and these timbers would have basically always been below grade in this spot. What's more, this shed seems to have been built inside an old access easement (working on that separately) that dates back to before my lot was even split off which makes it seem unlikely to have been a deck or old basement or whatever. The osb-sheeting seems to have been added later, before the current gravel layer went in, but in some places it's butted up tightly and in others it's just thrown down willy-nilly over more gravel. Any ideas what this used to be? I don't really want to start an archeological excavation here (I can't see anything but dirt under the rotted timbers) but I feel like I should probably know what's going on here before I start filling this shed with stuff.
    2 points
  5. When I read “contact us for a price” and “make an offer”, I knew I probably didn’t have room for it!
    2 points
  6. I use a similar pad protector linked above, i think it is made by Mirka. Whoever makes it, it is less expensive than Festool. If I remember correctly it was in the $5 range. For me, using the intermediate pad the hook and loop outlasted the foam on the Festool pad.
    2 points
  7. I forget where the reviews of orbital sanding disc originated but one of the top picked discs were the 3M Xtract. I ordered an expensive box of the 150 to try them. Agreed with the review that they are aggressive and long lasting but that’s where my love ends. Used with my Festool ETS 150, they are but impossible to remove from the sanding pad. I don’t know if it’s the heat build up during sanding or what, but it’s unlike any other disc I have ever used. Not worth the cost of replacing the $45 Festool pad.
    1 point
  8. Here @Coop, this should get you by...
    1 point
  9. Coop how long did you run the disc on the pad? Is the pad new or heavily used? I'm curious as to what happened it seems like the paper is both used and well liked. Something had to have happened. Maybe try reaching out to festool customer service and see if they have suggestions. I know Wdwerker said he got good advice from them back in the day. I also stumbled upon this it seems like maybe the net type abrasives are hard on the hook and loop? https://www.festoolproducts.com/festool-203343-granat-net-protection-pad-for-6-sanders-2-pack.html
    1 point
  10. I used some of the Gator brand hand sanding the other day with a preppin weapon. Was a little surprised that 120 grit 3M was pulling off so much more sawdust than 80 grit Gator. I think I'll save any remaining Gator brand paper for the kids to use.
    1 point
  11. You can walk it up, and down the column. I didn't measure the range of motion, but probably one foot.
    1 point
  12. Ken, you've seen mine, it's the HF 1 1/2 DC and as you know it's ducted to the outside. So my set up wouldn't work for you, and I'm using 4" piping at a 9 ft ceiling. However it works well at all 5 stations.
    1 point
  13. I know several people who went with the Super Cell and like it. I couldn't give you any specifics, but I have not heard them voice any complaints. I have a Laguna P-Flux 3, and I think it was a good trade off of cone separator performance and height. At this point in my life I never want to face having to get 50 gallons of sawdust out of the basement, so a smaller bin is fine with me.
    1 point