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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/20/22 in all areas

  1. Gadzooks! I can’t believe three weeks have slipped by since I last posted. I did take several days to make a lathe mount for the carving stand (which has been very useful). And there was some personal business in there, too. But if I’m honest shaping and smoothing the four top edges was a tedious and un-inviting task, and it probably didn’t get as much enthusiastic participation from me as it might have deserved (i.e. it was easy to find “better” things to do). Call it ten days of hobby time. Now I know, “it didn’t happen without pictures”, and I did snap some, but rather than bore you with photos of a lot of sanding how about just one of a lot of sand: And after shaping and sanding the top edge here is what the base looks like: I think the smooth sweeping curve of the edge is a strong feature of the piece. I have to keep reminding myself of that because the bottom edge remains to be done. While the base is still mounted I took the opportunity to go over the outside surface with p1200 and address the inevitable boo boo’s on the surface. I can’t really access the bottom edge adequately while the base remains mounted to the sacrificial block, so the time has come to remove it. First step is to remove the template and it’s retaining bolt to make more room for the saw. Then remount onto the screw chuck. Now a flush cut saw very carefully placed flat against the sacrificial block. Then worked slowly and carefully under the foot until it is released. Repeat that for the other three feet. The blue tape held on well and I’m going to “say” it did its job. There was no no visible squeeze out. Maybe there was a tiny bead that was sawn away, or maybe there was none to begin with, but, in as much as there was nothing to clean up, I’m calling that a success. There are some boo boo’s at the edges, and this despite being extremely careful with the saw. I’m hoping that they will clean up with some light sanding. Next bit will be to bring the bottom edges to final contour and sand them smooth. I have no ready means to mount the base, so at this point I think I will have to hand hold it while doing this work.
    3 points
  2. dig 90' down, if there is a stone marker with strange markings call the History Chanel ASAP, if it were me i would have to dig, at least some way down, i love a good treasure hunt
    3 points
  3. So we’re getting a bit closer to the start of this build. To catch you up, I’m building a 1200sq ft, wood framed shop dedicated solely to woodworking. Ceiling height will be 14’ for the possibility of parking RVs or boats in the building should I ever wish to sell the property (much more common toys down here than table saws and jointers). I’m taking @gee-dub’s idea and putting a 3/4 height wall about 8’ from the back wall to allow for a space for finishing. I’ll be running some electrical through the slab to keep from having to hang electrical cords down from 14’, so I’ve been playing with the layout a bit. Obviously things tend to change over time as you work in a shop, but want to at least get to where I have an idea of where outlets should be placed in the floor. Based on some suggestions given in another current thread, here is what I have. Some of the tools are existing, some are purchases as soon as the shop is built, and others are sized for what I hope will be upgrades in the future. As always, I welcome thoughts, suggestions, and critiques.
    2 points
  4. I never took photos of how I whitened the tree canopy. What I did was make a sand baster from a Gatorade bottle and an air nozzle. I blasted the yellow skin of the burl until all of the oxidation surface was removed and a white surface emerged. The finish is super blonde shellac that I sprayed using a gravity feed spray gun, which did great in evening out the finish. Since the surface could not be scuffed between coats, I utilized a finish that broke through the previous coats without the need to prepare between coats of finish. Using a very light color shellac would be beneficial to not color the canopy much at all.
    2 points
  5. The Lee Valley drill press table took two days to get here. Ordered on Tuesday afternoon, it came this morning. I haven't had time to open the box yet, since we're busy battening down the hatches for another blast of Winter weather, but I was really surprised it was a two day delivery.
    2 points
  6. Yes, I am in the Buffalo area. However, I got my under graduate degree from The University of Michigan, so unless I want my degree nullified I am obligated to being a Tom Brady fan. That being said, I am a baseball fan. I have no idea why everyone was sitting outside last Saturday in Orchard Park freezing their collective fannies off watching a game when I was inside toasty warm watching on a high def 55-inch screen.
    2 points
  7. The case of the moving steps is quarter-inch plywood with mahogany veneer on the inside and eighth-inch thick white oak siding and wenge trim. The steps are spalted butternut and red cedar and they rest upon maple cams and the steps are joined together with teak dovetail supports. The dark shadowy Billy B. is gaboon ebony. The drive shaft is turned from curly prymiria and is attached to the bubinga drive gear with a wedged tenon. I used manufactured dowel pins as the teeth of the offset gears. I wound up having to alter the number of teeth from 13 to 15 teeth to get the gearing correct. Much of this M7 project incorporated a number of "do-overs" because even though I had the concept in my head, sometimes my math did not equate to the actual behavior of the system.
    2 points
  8. You have been very helpful. Thank you for the awesomeness and the sensible things you impart. I am actually from Norway, but I am residing in Nebraska now. My grandpa when he retired he lived in Switzerland, that's why I got this Badog CNC machine few months before his passing. I am also planning to live a new life there soon and stay for good. I really love woodworking and metalworking is my next thing to study once I mastered this woodworking and woodturning stuff. I really appreciate you. Have an awesome one!
    2 points
  9. Me and my wife’s mutt spent about 30 minutes walking at the dog park today. The winds were about 20 mph but I still avoided anyone else there. Hopefully, just an inconvenience. Thanks!
    2 points
  10. Thanks for the thoughts Mark. Hadn’t thought about the floor outlets being on a separate circuit. Not a bad idea and one to explore. Ive thought about a false ceiling too. Not sure what that cost would be but if it’s not too unreasonable, it may be the best way to go, especially as that would allow me to run ducting in the ceiling and be able to change things in the future if desired. Not too worried about cold down here, but want to keep insulated from the outside heat for sure.
    1 point
  11. Rube Goldberg was a poser. All that cat did was draw crazy contraptions. None of Goldberg's designs had to work, it was all conjecture on his part. I pulled out a shizits amount of hair to get this to work without flaws.
    1 point
  12. All I can say is WOW! And I hope the next step down't involve that baseball bat ...
    1 point
  13. I’d pour loose concrete and don’t notify the authorities! Shop is looking great!
    1 point
  14. Just ordered these in case Festool had a problem with the one suggested by @Dave. Thanks Nut! Dave, thanks for your input as well. So these attach to the pad and the disc attach to them? Do the discs remove from the protector pretty easily?
    1 point
  15. Looks like another 'Oak Island' mystery, to me!
    1 point
  16. Time flies eh? Insulation I got one completed quote for spray foam insulation, which was unsurprisingly a kick to the wallet. Getting the whole shop up to residential insulation (R38ish in the ceiling, 21 in the walls) came in at a solid $21k. If I did just the ceiling and reduced the spray thickness it's only $7.5k, which is still my entire on-hand cash reserve for getting the shop up to snuff. Still waiting on two more quotes to come in. One company will be giving me both spray and batting options, the other only batting. I'm resigned to probably doing the walls myself again, and putting the real money into the ceiling and other parts of the shop. Lighting and Electrical I got the new LED lights up on one side of the shop, and man it's a night-and-day difference. I've already ordered more lights to put up on the second set of trusses. The placement of the two overhead fans isn't ideal, or even, but after some trial-and-error I'll stick with 4x4ft sections on each end of each truss, for 16 lights front-to-back in the main shop area. I'm still going to experiment with adding some hanging fixtures (I've got 4 extra of these lights) to fill in any dim areas like the center or over tools. There's a bit of a shadow from the garage door bars, but it's mostly in a part of the shop that's not currently earmarked for anything, so I'm not going to worry about it for the moment. Worse case I add a platform 18" down from the truss and have one lower set of lights. These Barrinas are nice and bright and definitely a higher-quality overall than the Feits I was using in my old shop. They're clear-covered, so if you look at them you can see individual spots... But I wouldn't recommend looking directly at them anyways. The manufacturer/brand has a similar light with about half the lumen density and a frosted cover which I'll be using in the upper loft area since there's not enough headroom not to have the lights directly in your line of vision. The rolling scaffold on the left is a godsend, especially for someone (me) whose not a fan of ladders. I've been bolting it to the walls for some extra rigidity, and use a 2x10x8 on-edge bolted to the narrow end when working in the middle of the shop. It's been working great and I highly recommend getting one if you've got tall ceilings. The whole thing breaks down flat if I ever need to store it. Structure Had to happen eventually, and I can't say I was surprised by what I found behind the old interior plywood sheeting. I mentioned that this place was a dog-training facility before I bought it, and well, the mice definitely appreciated a steady source of food and bedding material. Looks like they were using the wiring holes as a super-highway to get into the cavities in the walls. I think every single sheet I pulled down had at least a small nest. No evidence of live rodents though, which is interesting. Given that I only sealed up the exterior holes recently, I assume the prior owner used something to get rid of them. Poison would be a bad idea with all those dogs around, but who knows. Either way I shoveled and shop-vac'd up a lot of nests and mummified mice. There's a little mold on the inside of one wall, but on the whole everything looks to be in good shape. I need to silicone up some nail-holes on the exterior siding, but that's about it. Weatherizing/Heating I've gotten all the major holes in the walls filled up, and most of the cracks I can see light coming through. Got the garage door tracks re-aligned to the openings, though they're not as smooth to open now, and only have a couple more pieces of vinyl to install to get them fully air-sealed. The shop is already a lot more pleasant to work in, especially after I added a 5000W electric heater. Cheap to buy and expensive to run, but this thing really helps take the edge off. I don't trust it unattended, but with just a few minutes it'll get the air temp up 3-5 degrees, and I already had an RV outlet for it. All told I've got about 8000W of electric heat spread around the shop right now. Not a great long-term solution, but good enough to get moving forward. A little mystery While working in the attached lumber shed, I walked over a hollow-sounding section of gravel. Childhood stories of buried treasure (or bodies) racing through my mind, I pulled back the rocks and this is what I found. I can't figure out what these rotted old timbers would have been for. The slab/skirt of the garage itself seems to run right past them. There is an older concrete slab a little beyond the edge of the woodshed, but they don't connect, and these timbers would have basically always been below grade in this spot. What's more, this shed seems to have been built inside an old access easement (working on that separately) that dates back to before my lot was even split off which makes it seem unlikely to have been a deck or old basement or whatever. The osb-sheeting seems to have been added later, before the current gravel layer went in, but in some places it's butted up tightly and in others it's just thrown down willy-nilly over more gravel. Any ideas what this used to be? I don't really want to start an archeological excavation here (I can't see anything but dirt under the rotted timbers) but I feel like I should probably know what's going on here before I start filling this shed with stuff.
    1 point
  17. The old adage holds true "If you have to ask for the price, you can't afford it."
    1 point
  18. Poplar is a very bland and uninspiring wood, but it is cheaper and turns very easily. So it's a good wood to experiment/learn with. When you are confident in your process and you have a program for a form you like, then most attractive woods like cherry, walnut and maple are good choices. You make it sound like popping over to Switzerland is just a trip across town, so I'm curious what part of the planet you are posting from?
    1 point
  19. Your teasing my curiosity. More to come, I hope.
    1 point
  20. Drew, I love the appearance of the ray fleck, but if this were a piece for sale, or a commission, I would avoid that stick for its lack of uniformity. Its a big risk any bits that stand out will be loved or hated by the client. If YOU are the client, then only you (and Megan) can decide.
    1 point
  21. Only those who buy my rockers seem to be good with the purchase price of this handmade chair. It has been my experience over the past 40+ years of doing this craft, that many people, (woodworkers especially), become indignant with my prices. I sell in three select locations where price is never the deciding factor in the purchase of a rocker. Lets just say that I get a comparable hourly rate as a top flight auto mechanic.
    1 point
  22. I wanted to share this build, it really goes quickly and it's a design that I came up with while posting the story on the log, the slab and the table. The joinery is simple and by varying the size of the legs it can serve as an end table, a plant stand, or (fill in the blank). I like how there is a certain flow that develops from the underside of the table down into the legs. This area is refined and sculpted after the table is put together. @Mark J noted in my previous build post that he liked this small table better than the table the post was about. I tend to agree with him. I'll take you thru the thought process, the build and the final piece all in one post. This really is a long weekend project for me and the build I show here will end up being a plant stand instead of a table, so it is only 14" tall instead of 22" like the original table was. Here's the original "afterthought table" from the other post; So to start on this table I made a pattern for my leg. This leg is much shorter than the leg I developed for the table above. Also I used a "leftover" section of the hexagonal "post" I made for the original table. Since there are three legs, you need the six sided post. I also like the three leg design because the table always sits flat without rocking, even on an uneven floor; The leg can really be any shape, as long as you have a square inside corner. This corner is the key to this project; NOTE: You can accomplish the below operation also by starting with a wider board that has a straight edge and has a corresponding 90 degree cut. You can place the pattern in the corner and just cut out the leg from there. But I do it the way shown below to develop a grain that follows the curve of the leg more, resulting in a more attractive look and stronger grain orientation. So I milled up some stock that is pretty close to the thickness of one of the sides of the hexagon. Working out the three legs on this stock; You'll notice in the above pic and the below pic I draw an extended straight line that is part of the key right angle at the top of the leg; I cut along this line with the bandsaw first; Next I true up this line on the jointer; Now I can cut my 90 degree angle on the table saw; After that it's simply cutting out the rest of the leg with the bandsaw. But it is important to save these top cut off pieces for glue up, you will see me use these later; Here's how the leg structure fits together, the legs will be glued to the hexagonal post and it will be a nice long grain to relatively long grain glue joint; On to the top, a hunk of figured wood in rough form; Milled to thickness, around two inches wide and cut freehand on the bandsaw to 11" round. Showing each surface; I picked the surface in the second pic for the top side of the table. I then found the center point and tried on the legs; Some critical landmarks; an outline of the hexagonal post, the center point, and the end point of each leg; Center 1/2" dowel hole and a circle representing the circle the legs "make", basically a circle that falls on the line where the legs end; Beveling the underside starts at the bandsaw; Then to the bench where I use a Festool RAS to develop the rough bevel; Corresponding 1/2" hole in the hexagonal post (both holes drilled on drill press) and the 1/2" dowel ready to be glued; Gluing post to top; Some shaping of the post on the faces the legs will not be glued to; Shaping the legs, done with rasps; Gluing first leg. Need to glue one leg at a time and the cut off pieces from the legs are put to use now for the glue up. I also glue the top part of the leg to the underside of the table. That's a weak end grain to long grain glue joint, but it doesn't hurt to do it anyway; All three legs glued on, now to the final shaping; Goal is to blend the bevel into the legs; Like this, and then making the bevel uniform all the way around the top; A little cleanup at the post/leg joint, do this with a sharp chisel; And finished, sanded to 320 and Osmo finish; Hope this was helpful post. This shows a pretty straight forward construction without elaborate joints. It's a versatile table that can be made at different heights and for different uses. I'll be making more of these in the future, it also is a good use of figured chunks of wood and doesn't use much wood in the construction. I do think the 2" thick top is a little excessive with this table and I'm going to make the next one with a 6/4 top. The first table's top was about that thick, 6/4. I also think the longer legs with the taller table look more elegant than the shorter planter sized table. I'm wondering if I could use this design for a lamp build, a lamp table combo, how's that sound @JohnG?
    1 point
  23. Follow up, walnut chairs back from my upholstery guy. Love the green with the walnut. Creating a MCM sitting area/room. Bookcase also made esp for this spot; Hopefully you enjoyed this build, it was a real pleasure figuring out these chairs. My daughter has already put an order in for a set, so much to build........
    1 point