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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/22/22 in all areas

  1. Hello all. I have decided that I have an abundance of time on my hands (sorry, even I had to laugh at that.) and so, we decided to remodel the kitchen. This will be no easy undertaking because we have decided that at the same time, we will be replacing the entire first floor with hardwood floors (currently tile) So, the wife loves the Maple vanity I built for the upstairs bathroom, so we are going with maple again. Thought it would be a nice change of pace from the dark outdated oak we currently have. Looking around the internet, I have come across a lot of cross talk about whether or not the base should be 1 piece along with the carcasses, or to build a separate base that can be leveled and then the carcasses set on top of a level work surface. I am going with the later. There is something kind of cheesy looking about the outer side pieces having 1 continuous board from top to bottom with the toe kick notched out. I like the offset look. plus, the option to level the base and come back and just plunk down the bulky part of the cabinet seems just better somehow. This will be my biggest project to date and maybe forever (lol), so I am calculating everything I possibly can, to minimize waste and heartache. Wood can be plain, or beautiful from board to board. My question is Is it best to buy your wood from one location? I have a "Wood cart" near by that sells slab wood of many species. I could go this route and try to mill up the wood myself. My planer (dewalt 735x with wings) is um... well... it works, but it does this weird thing where as the board is feeding, it sort of pauses or slips and its not really snipe, but its... well, a slight gouge maybe 1/32" about 2 to 3" in on the feed side of the board happens. Then the rest of the process is perfect. So.. do I get some S4S boards?! Do I take my planer to a specialist and get back to trying to mill up my own stuff? I tend to put positive pressure on the board as it begins feeding into the planer to try to prevent the pause. Sometimes it works, sometimes it does not. I have a joiner, which could do a portion of the milling, but not all. I also have a bandsaw with a 3/4" rip blade and a 1/2" blade as well. Do I hand sand all the boards after sending them through my own planer? I have had good luck running the boards through my table saw and flipping them over end over end raising the blade a little each time. Any suggestions or thoughts would help. I get a lot of compliments on my vanity, so I am hoping to have similar luck, but on a grander scale :)
    2 points
  2. I had a bunch of PM work meetings so I only got a few hours in this past week, other than the weekend. I've started on the large task of making the dust/web frames. I got a rough idea of the material needed and milled up parts. For some of the dust frame parts I needed a cherry edge band for the visual face. The past few times I've had to do banding I've gotten into the habbit of using my bench as a caul. It works amazing well to distribute pressure evenly along a joint where one of the pieces is very flexible. I needed to get everything to finished thickness to figure out some relative dimensions with in the case of the dresser. Once I figured out the thickness I could measure the width and cut the front rails and begin the back structure. I also need a middle divider with rails to support the dust frames in the middle of the case. This will connect to the back of the dresser to provide additional support to the frames. The front bottom rail will be very small and delicate looking so the weight from the drawers will need some additional support. The case is upside down in the picture below. Making the dust frames has been mentally challenging. I've needed to try and figure out dimensions and ways to trim the frames such that everything is square. To aid in this I made a glue jig on my spare work bench. I took the extra leg I made just in case and clamped it down. I then squared a corner I then placed the plywood so the 2 sides that were square would provide me a square corner to clamp into. When gluing the dust frames I just made sure that the frame was against the piece on the right and the plywood snugly. Each of the frames came out nice and square this way. Some of the frames I made a bit oversized and will be cut down later. Now that most of the dust frames and together I put glue on the rear structure and glued it together. I will then remove it from the case to cut a rabbet for the plywood backer. I'm trying to create as many sub assemblies as possible so when the glue up happens it has as few of parts as possible.
    2 points
  3. Rock on. I stole the idea from one of the smaller yards I use. In the immortal words of Butch Cassidy "Well, that oughta do it . . . " At least the space I needed cleared out is nearly done. Just a few long sticks to put up on the wall racks and I'm good.
    2 points
  4. I have a Ridgid dedicated spindle sander and a combo belt/disc sander, mounted on a rotating table, so just the footprint of one machine. On the occasion where my spindle sanding sleeve slips on the rubber roller, I find that wrapping each end of the roller with a round or two of blue tape, helps considerably.
    1 point
  5. Rex built a cool cabinet to enhance his floor standing DP here. If you're like me I look at everybody's stuff and then steal, render, modify all the ideas that work best for my particular setup. I made a cabinet a while back and thought I would share it for yet more brain fodder. My DP stands on a ready-crete filled ballast (welcome to California) which in turn stands in a mobile base. I have moved the DP exactly never in the last 9 years so I built the cabinet with the plan to bolt the DP to the floor, add casters to the cabinet that would straddle that bolted down base and be able to roll the cabinet out of the way as required. No casters yet ;-) The bottom of my DP always looked like this. I had some shop grade ply that was leftover from something else and was in my way so it became my material (talk about random choice). Cut it up and dado'd and rabbeted some joinery into it. My design is actually three boxes that get joined. The rear side boxes have shelf pegs for adjustment. Dados, rabbets and plywood make a pretty rigid box. The brawer boxes are also plywood and are just glue and pocket-holed together. I make some pulls. And it starts to come together. It currently sets on the ballast base. Once the DP is bolted to the floor the casters I mount will straddle the base. So there's another take on the same general idea. Hope Rex's and my threads provide some food for thought if / when you are thinking about making your own.
    1 point
  6. The end that is farther from the cutter at the moment. Tail end when feeding, head end while exiting. Requires a lot of running around, or an apprentice!
    1 point
  7. Problem solved at my place. I know this is an old thread. I had given up; however, a few months ago tried a newer type GFCI at the suggestion of my son. Hasn’t tripped since. Home Depot: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-20-Amp-125-Volt-Duplex-Self-Test-Tamper-Resistant-Weather-Resistant-GFCI-Outlet-White-R92-GFWT2-0KW/205997283
    1 point
  8. Upward pressure on the exiting end, or the entering end of the board?
    1 point
  9. Looks like cracks in epoxy to me. It may be possible to get a thin superglue or something else to flow down into the cracks, assuming you can feel the cracks on the surface. This would make the cracks less visible, but then getting the surface smoothed and blended would be difficult without the right tools and experience. Hopefully someone more knowledgeable will post and give their thoughts.
    1 point
  10. You may also need to clean the in feed and out feed rollers. It's possible that they are dirty. A huge +1 to waxing the beds of the 735. When i had mine i tried to wax the beds monthly to keep them nice and slick. When i neglected that I'd run into the situation that you are experiencing. If that doesn't work I'd try and find a way to have it serviced. The DW735 is a very well design machine that is easy to work on but the feed rollers could get finicky and I wouldn't want to ruin something.
    1 point
  11. If you want a uniform color and grain pattern, try to purchase an entire tree of boards from a sawyer / lumber yard. I would avoid trying to mill boards from a slab, as slabs are generally far more expensive per board foot, and less consistently dried. You may find you freshly-milled boards warping like crazy. Regarding the planer, waxing the bed often prevents the slippage you describe, and I find that applting pressure UPWARD at the end of the board as it passes the cutter generally alleviates snipe. Lifting the far end helps hold the end at the cutter down, just as it losing the pressure from the feed roller.
    1 point
  12. I have a Ridgid spindle / belt sander of the same format as that Triton. It is a very useful machine for small-ish work and small workspace, but you are correct. The platten is not very large, and the belt is short enough that it clogs with spoil quickly. A belt 'eraser' is an essential accessory. I rarely use the spindles, as they are difficult to keep tight on the rubber core, and clog up even more rapidly than the belt. For a hobby volume of work, its a pretty good arrangement, but maybe not for larger tasks.
    1 point
  13. You have bigger nads than me! As much as I love Woodworking and doing things myself, sometimes a little out of my capabilities, this is defiantly something I would leave to the pros. There are people that do this for a living and if they screw up, usually you have some recourse. Good luck.
    1 point
  14. I love the idea of that rail and movable dividers. Will probably be stealing that idea shortly for my own vertical racks.
    1 point
  15. @Chestnut - Nope. That was me. I went back and re-read and I was pretty vague. I added a little clarification. I'm having fun. As I move stuff into the shop I unearth things I haven't seen for a couple of years
    1 point
  16. @ChestnutIt is only temporary by location. It is in the space reserved for my spray booth . If things work out a panel-shorts bin that takes up about 8 square feet of floor space will get replaced by the new panel-shorts space behind the plywood corral. My permanent vertical storage will then move to the old panel-shorts bin location. Its like Christmas today. I moved that white oak and found a nest of sapele. I moved the sapele and found some walnut. I also found some over-ten-foot stock in the area I am trying to empty. I will move the sub-10 foot stock out of the horizontal racks and put it in the vertical space. This should allow me to put the long stuff in the horizontal racks and make enough room to empty the area that is in need or 'use reassignment'
    1 point
  17. It resides at a man's home whom likes to write sizable checks--which clear the bank!
    1 point
  18. The top of a cheaply made coffin.
    1 point
  19. You could try finding some historical aerial photos of your property. If you download Google Earth you can go back some, but if it's before they started collecting photos maybe some county/state photos would be available. Or you could look at old permits? Maybe it's some backfill for a removed septic tank? Or the base for an oil tank to heat the garage?
    1 point