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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/07/22 in all areas

  1. Those of you with kids in 4-H understand “4-H Flops”…well, yesterday M and I had one of our own when making her shaker box. I prepped the blank several weeks ago (resawed my last piece of cherry, milled it to 0.96”, raised the grain) and yesterday she cut the fingers, marked the tacks, and put it in the steambox. She did a great job clinching the tacks and keeping everything lined up…we were on our way to success when I pushed the drying form into it and split the blank. Crap. The kicker is that I made two other boxes from the same board without a hiccup and this happened to be the last piece of cherry in the shop. She did seem a little excited when I told her that this means we have to go to the sawmill now for her to pick out a new board (usually a boys trip). Thanks for letting me whine about our failure...I'll show myself out. I know that it may look like I distracted her at the bandsaw, I didn't...if you look close, it's not even running.
    6 points
  2. Maybe next time you just need to stand back and stay out of her way.
    5 points
  3. Progress on both the shotgun case and skeet range have been slow. We were able to get the dovetails cut on the pantorouter and recess cut for the panels last week and I spent 2 days trying to find clear 15 min epoxy in town; 5 min in stock everywhere, but I was afraid we needed more time to assemble. Yesterday we got the case glued up and tomorrow I’m going to go see a fellow woodworker with a higher-capacity drum sander so we can face the top and bottom before we split it (my Ryobi only has a 3.25” capacity, I need 3.5”). Anyway, pics are below with more on the way as we continue to forge ahead.
    5 points
  4. so i planned on woodworking today but Mother Nature had a different plan, and no @Coop, i don't want to see any pictures of you planting tomatoes
    4 points
  5. Made more progress on testing the ebonizing method over the weekend, first I mixed up the bark tan adding a heaping table spoon into about 1" of hot water and mixing then I added the remainder of the pint of hot water and mix further According to the article this will last for months Then I strained the mixture from the vinegar and steel wool (after 10ish days) through a coffee strainer. This took forever so I used a spray can to hold the strainer Once strained Boggs advises to try a piece (this is read oak) It appeared to work so I milled up some scrap to try the whole ebonizing process on (white oak, red oak, ash, & walnut) I sanded the samples from 120 through 320 raising the grain twice Then applied the mixtures first the bark tan and once it no longer looks wet the vinegar mixture: Here is how they came out I just need to decide on a finish for the top coat now. I will be making 4-6 bar stools plus 2 pool table spectator chairs which is why I used the various woods. Since I will be ebonizing all of these if I can use a cheaper wood I will as long as I can achieve the desired result.
    4 points
  6. I failed miserably on getting pics of the veneer re-sawing and preparation. I spent the morning helping a neighbor with his boat. Short story is that we had to be towed back in to the ramp . . . don't ask. Certainly could have been a worse place to wait for a tow. At any rate, time was short so I just plowed through. This is the best I've got. You may notice the Veneer is a bit thick. Veneering is very new to me; this is my second run. I should have made the panels first and then cut the grooves that will hold them. LOML has specified that she wants the panels flush with the rails and stiles. This means a rabbeted edge on the panels. I calculated using whole imperial dimensions (like 1/4") for the substrate. BB ply is metric so it will be a bit shy . .. Doh! My solution was to go thick on the veneer. I will drum sand it back to the dimension I want. 20/20 hindsight. I'll try to do better next time.
    3 points
  7. I just finished a small table for a large house plant to live on. It is 14" square and 12" tall. My wife's friend wanted it to have a beach theme. So I used white oak with a whitewash water base stain. Now General Finishes whitewash stain allows the color of the wood to be seen through the whitewash so I decided to stain the wood blue before using the white. I mixed transtint blue dye with some whitewash. Worked great - one coat. Then 4 coats of whitewash to get the look I wanted. Then 3 coats of General Finishes water based poly. My mistake is that I only but one coat of whitewash (not a great sealer) on the underside of the top. When I picked up the top to install it on the table I saw the it was cupped. Slap the forehead and swear. The top surface (where all the moisture from the many coats of water base stain was applied) was the convex side of the cupped just as I would expect if I had thought it through. Before throwing it away and starting over I decided try to even out the cup. I rough sanded the under side to expose mostly bare wood and spray water on it. I covered the surface with blue Scott towels and sprayed them with water. Kept adding a little spary every few hours. After about 2 days almost all the cup was gone. I dried off the surface with a rag and applied a coat of waterbase poly. As it dried, water tended to pond on the surface in irregular patterns. I thought maybe the poly would never dry, but it did and I wiped away the excess water and did a second coat. Then wiped away the water again and did a third coat - no water this time. I let it sit overnight and it was still straight the next morning. I installed the top with table 8's. I just hope the it does not self destruct over the next couple of weeks. I am taking bets. Lesson learned.
    3 points
  8. That case is gorgeous! BTW, you might try splitting it apart on the table saw. Use a 7.25" circular saw blade, they have a kerf width approaching bandsaw dimensions. Set the blade height just short of completely through the material, that way it won't close up on you. The use a flush-cut saw or even a razor knife to separate the halves, and a block plane to smooth away the remaining ridge.
    2 points
  9. Template only has to be as thick as the collet guide collar. Have fun!
    2 points
  10. I let the bit bottom out and then bring it back out some. I don't really measure but it is probably closer to 1/4" then an 1/8th. Also you can get back some of your cutting depth by making your template out of thiner material. With a guide bushing it only needs to be thick enough for your guide bushing to ride properly.
    2 points
  11. Got the first two coats on them this morning in spite of the strong wind. I set up with the house blocking the wind, and put the sections back in the garage as I sprayed them. They got some tiny pieces of trash on them, but they look good enough. Picture with window reflection on them is the first coat, almost dry. The Totalboat Halcyon was obviously a little thicker than the Target Coatings EM8000cv, so I cranked the pressure up a little to 1000, but that wasn't quite enough to get the fluid flow I wanted. 1050 was just right.
    2 points
  12. I used to pull out pages or print things I really wanted and tried to organize them in a binder. Then I never reference them. Did something similar electronically with Evernote or Microsoft OneNote. I do still try to bookmark or save a YouTube video if I think it will be useful but I find myself referencing stuff less and less until I really need something and then I just start from scratch.
    2 points
  13. Not sure if this is as good of sale as the previous bosch router sale but i havne't seen a colt for $80 in a long time. https://smile.amazon.com/Bosch-1-Horsepower-Electronic-Variable-Speed-PR20EVS/dp/B01M0J08MF/ref=sr_1_3?crid=VU1NYTZGE95D&keywords=PR20EVS&qid=1646665775&sprefix=%2Caps%2C974&sr=8-3&th=1 The other Rockler has the same price if your close to one of those https://www.woodcraft.com/products/colt-1-hp-variable-speed-palm-router-bosch?trk_msg=T3GOVATV3H4KR10AIP9QS9OTR4&trk_contact=B7NO7P5TLS9K0OMA5QE11QO1HS&trk_sid=5ETIT4QV3H6U5B0QNLKVR8L23O&trk_link=BO0BNSOPB0QK72BNE1TCOHHM58&utm_source=listrak&utm_medium=email&utm_term=SHOP+NOW-+BOSCH+COLT+1HP+VARIABLE+SPEED+PALM+ROUTER-+SAVE+%2440&utm_campaign=DIRECT+MAR2022&utm_content=POWER+TOOLS+MAR2022 Or if you live near a Menards you can get it for $79 plus 11% off. https://www.menards.com/main/tools/power-tools/routers/bosch-reg-colt-trade-1-0-hp-variable-speed-compact-palm-router/pr20evs/p-1444452442091-c-10087.htm?tid=-3072517081215833504&ipos=27
    2 points
  14. I recall going back down the inter-coastal canal one afternoon, headed for a spot where we tore the fish up that morning. About 3 miles down, we came across a man and his two kids in a boat, stranded. He was on the bow, tossing his anchor and pulling him forward, a few feet at a time. We spent our fishing afternoon, towing them back to the dock. Actually, it was a better feeling than catching a 5# speckled trout.
    2 points
  15. I'll be glad for this job to be done. Sanding, and especially hand sanding is near the bottom of the list of things I enjoy doing. I was back and forth over there today so many times that I don't know exactly how much time I spent on them today. Wind is supposed to be blowing 30 tomorrow, but I'll probably spray them anyway in the lee of the house, and put them directly in the garage between coats.
    2 points
  16. Final shaping of the fingers happens at my oscillating belt / spindle sander. The changes I made to the shape give me good reference surfaces for this operation. All the fingers are finally shaped. One last thing. I need a way to insert or remove the fingers from the slats after they are in the box. I decided to notch the ends of the slats to make an entry point at each side. Do it works like this: And another mock-up to test the fit. Sorry, that image is sideways. Anyway, some fingers are snug, some are a bit loose. I'll wait until final sanding to make adjustments. Meanwhile, I also did some "carving" to level out the corners of the door molding. The miters were tight, but some not so level. Looking better now.
    2 points
  17. Normally I take it easy on Sundays, but with today and tomorrow looking ideal for this job, I went to work this morning. The EM8000 sands beautifully, just like the Conversion Varnishs we used to know. It doesn't sand as easy as sanding sealer, but really not bad at all. This is what I mean by "powders up nicely". Tomorrow is supposed to be warm enough for me to spray all day long, so I should be able to get enough coats of the Halcyon on them to finish. Blowing 17 mph today, so a good day for sanding.
    2 points
  18. If I may add a word or two of caution. You mentioned the possibility of reducing the foot print. Be aware that band saws tend to be top heavy. I would not reduce the foot print more than it already is. Putting the motor under the saw will help with this, but it will eat up storage space if that is what you are looking for. If storage space protected from dust is your objective, an easy way to do that is to just cover the sides of what you have with 1/4" plywood or similar.
    2 points
  19. I've always been interested in building Federal style projects; however, recently I've been watching David Boeff's videos on YouTube. He is a master cabinet maker who specializes in making 18th century furniture. He does an outstanding job of explaining his work processes and got me interested in attempting to build something in a Chippendale style. The 4-drawer chest that I'm building is an amalgamation of many of David's previous projects. I began the process by making full scale drawings and reading books on period style and processes (something that I never took the time to do in the past). I'm using cherry for the case and poplar for the carcass. It uses dovetail joinery for the casework. The drawer blades are joined using shouldered sliding dovetails. One of the unique features of Chippendale is that the cock-bead moulding is part of the drawer blades above and below and inserted as separate pieces on the sides (see photos below). Cock beading on Federal pieces is attached to the perimeter of the drawer. \ David Boeff does an excellent job in describing how to make the Ogee footings. I'' be happy to explain the process that I used in making them if your interested. This is what the project looked like when I did the initial assembly. I'll describe subsequent steps with my next posting.
    1 point
  20. I wouldn't call it a flop. It was a learning experience for both of you. Not only did she learn how to make the boxes, she got to see a sawmill. And you got to spend quality time with her. Win all the way around!
    1 point
  21. funny you mention this wtnhighlander, that's exactly my plan...I switched to 7.25" circular saw blades in my 10" tablesaw several years ago and refuse to go back. You think a 3Hp 10" saw is powerful, put a 7.25" blade on it...and push as fast as you want, it'll eat it.
    1 point
  22. I agree with Chet about the thickness of your template material. Also, some bits have a line drawn on the shank for minimum depth setting. You can always clear out the remaining depth with a chisel. And if you do miss your 1 1/2 by a smidge, it probably won’t matter.
    1 point
  23. long story short, I didn't buy the saw Friday...the seller attempted to sell the entire lot of equipment to another guy before I got there (even though he knew when I was coming and that I was interested). Well, the other guy backed out of the package deal Saturday and he offered me the saw for the original price...I countered, significantly lower ($1k). I spent some time yesterday looking at craigslist for 14"+ bandsaws, at it appears that this 'missed opportunity' may not be an opportunity at all; there's bigger resaw bandsaws within 3hrs of me for the same (or slightly less) money. We'll see if he contacts me and accepts my new offer, stay tuned.
    1 point
  24. Good point. If I do make this way in the future, I'll probably lower it some too. Making underneath usable space would make me care a lot less about the size.
    1 point
  25. I always put a "carriage return" after every picture. That way every picture and any text starts on a new line. Nice work on the chest. Are you going hand or power tool?
    1 point
  26. For abrasives Klingspor is a good resources for excellent paper and good prices considering the quality. https://www.klingspor.com/ Band saw blades i fell like the wood slicer from highland woodworking is about as good as you can get and is only a bit more expensive than the timber wolf blades that can be had cheap on amazon. https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/woodslicer-resaw-bandsaw-blades.aspx Table Saw blades. I buy Freud from either Acme tools or off amazon. Acme tools is a good resources but i have them local so i shop in person. Their prices are competitive but not the lowest. They customers support from my experience has been good. They have tools lots of them but that's about it. https://www.acmetools.com/freud/circular-saw-blades/?oci=freud-circular-saw-blades I've used the famed Forrest WWII and a few other expensive table saw blades. The blades that live on my saws are Freud Industrial blades. They are usually half the price of the boutique blades and cut wood all the same with excellent quality. I like their rust preventive coatings that are not found on the boutique blades. The carbide is nice and think and I've gotten 5 sharpenings so far out of my full kerf cross cut blade.
    1 point
  27. I have had this stack for years, and their customer service is out standing. when I bought them they were set up for cutting plywood; with the side spurs. I work solid woods and didn't want to see the spur cut. they re-ground them and shipped them back..... no cost. Plus answer any questions. they have a good height to them. Sandpaper: Drum sander...... I buy on Amazon and buy the rolls and cut them my self. Sanding station: Wood shows.... I take care of them and don't go thought them that fast. Palm sander....... Lowes, home Depot, Woodcraft, Hardware store or Rocker. Sheet paper, same as Palm sanders...... Plus Garage sales. Thomas
    1 point
  28. Sometimes winner isn't so great other times i find it incredibly beautiful. The last 24 hours managed both. Despite the beautiful snow the ice that preceded it was not so enjoyable.
    1 point
  29. About a week ago I ordered a new router lift from Woodpeckers they said 8-10 weeks for delivery. Yesterday I get an email that it had shipped and will be here Tuesday So today I glued up a new table top and then squared it off. I need to get to a lumber yard this week and grab some maple for edging, then I can apply the laminate to the top, bottom, and new fence pieces.
    1 point
  30. Definitely a fan of stops. In this case there were just two of each so I just ran a pair, moved the stops, and ran the other pair. I have done other things where I will add a clamp on either side of the router table to allow me to return to a fence position when doing stepped cuts and stuff like that. I also have a half a dozen shop made flip-stops that I use in twos and threes for multi-step operations at the tablesaw or router table. Things like this really help me out as I do quite a bit of tablesaw and router table joinery.
    1 point
  31. I may have to do something with mine. I've noticed ignoring dovetail jigs, routers, etc are starting to show age. I buy a lot of used tools and they have already taken moisture and general tossing around by previous owners so I can't change their character... Guess you don't realize how much you've accumulated, till you have to clean it.
    1 point
  32. Looks great! Another piece to be enjoyed for generations.
    1 point
  33. Bravo! Sweet piece (and sweet story, too).
    1 point
  34. Only downside is the cleaning under the lower shelf which my wife would call an advantage!
    1 point
  35. Finally found the paint for the Dewalt scroll saw stand. One store and only one can left..
    1 point
  36. Is Northfield still in business? Those tablesaws have such a mass of iron that other tools in the shop need to be anchored against the gravitational attraction....
    1 point
  37. Knocked out my steam box today just need to find a latch although I'm thinking I may just go with screws and rubber bands... Now to find some non kiln dried walnut with MC in the 12-15% range
    1 point
  38. This orchid is a species from SE Asia. Currently blooming in my back yard. The plant climbs as much as 40'. This one lives on a cocoa nut tree.
    1 point
  39. My daughter's been having her asthma-like breathing issues since we ripped up the flooring. Just the the Wen shop air filter I ordered on Saturday night to run through the house and see if it will help her. Once we're done I guess I'll have to install it in my shop. Wish I had it last weekend, could have avoided her feeling sick and coughing for 3 days.
    0 points