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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/18/22 in all areas

  1. Azaleas, Dogwoods, and Lilacs are in full bloom. Leaves are all out, and still the early tender green color. Two young litters of puppies in the house. Bermuda grass is turning green, and waiting for the badly needed inch of soaking rain that's on the way, and today is my Mother's 106th Birthday, and Pam's and my 42nd Anniversary. All are healthy. Couldn't ask for more.
    4 points
  2. As promised, pics with finish applied. This is a pretty simple way to form a shallow tray that looks nice. Might have to make a few more with differen wood species. Thanks to @treeslayer for posting the original inspiration!
    4 points
  3. Not all today but the last couple of weeks I’ve picked a few things up. My Bostitch 18 gauge nail gun was leaking air again and since I have enough projects going on I replaced it for the same cost as a rebuild kit with this refurbished Ridgid. Found this 3D print file and had our local library print it out for me. Snaps on the back of the drill and holds bits. Also at some point last month I got a Husky tool bag and small Milwaukee bit set that takes up less room than the normal case. Was fixing too many random things and tired of all the trips to the basement to get a missing tool. And finally bought a Gracco Paint sprayer back when I started doing the baseboard. I think I’m done for tool purchases for a little bit.
    2 points
  4. Yes, basically, it's squaring up and clamping a 'fence' to the bottom side of the board & running it against the edge guide on the saw. I saw in on a youtube a while ago but can't remember which one. I had to cut a couple of pieces that were 1700mm x 700mm and it was easy as pie. To support the left side of the board I used the WorkMate (another win for the WorkMate!) with a board clamped in at the height of the saw table. I could easily see it handling stock quite a bit bigger. The 'fence' can be lots wider than the piece being cut for extra stability. It was at least as fast as the circular saw and straight edge, and the cut quality was superb. I can't believe I didn't know this was a thing. Highly recommended. Edit: it might have been Stumpy Nubs.
    2 points
  5. I put this edge guide on my table saw. It's shimmed out to be perfectly parallel with and exactly 580mm from the edge of the blade. By clamping a straight edge to a long wide board I can accurately and cleanly cut it on the table saw. I've made a few cuts already and it works wonderfully. If you have a good track saw & blade, this isn't really needed. But I just have a circular saw with a straight edge and I can't get as clean a cut as with the table saw, particularly with veneered or melamine sheet goods.
    2 points
  6. I like having buttons for the important things that I can use with out looking. Volume and switch songs are nice. Also the heated seat and steering wheel button is used ALOT.
    2 points
  7. @Coop, my slab was about 1" thick. Tray is around 12" x 18". It was just an experiment, so I never actually measured. Doing it again, I would leave more length on the "handles", so they could be cut to a more pleasing curve.
    2 points
  8. Yes. The 2 at the front are stationary and the 2 in the back have elongated holes. I used phillips head and washers. When you say flathead do you mean panhead? If so, yes.
    2 points
  9. Well I didn't. I did do some planing and sanding. Then after applying BLO and waiting a day it was about a 1/16" of an inch cupped on both sides. I only had one "show" side because of some surface defects so flipping the panel wasn't really an option. Since this was part of refurbishing an old dresser I just used it as is. It's attached to the original top using some screws about 2 inches from the edges. I did put a little tension where the panel curled up by tightening the screws but given the width of the panel is over 18 inches I think it'll be ok.
    2 points
  10. https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/techline/properties-of-juvenile-wood.pdf I try to avoid using the pith in anything but timbers, and even then, I want it in the center. If you are buying 4x4's, 4x6's, or such, and the pith is off center, that piece will not likely stay straight. Of course, it would be better to avoid it even then, but it's hard to do when buying those timbers these days.
    2 points
  11. I'm sure it is primarily working with a finishing protocol I am comfortable with but I am much happier already. I hope to finish up all the coats by end of day.
    2 points
  12. Jesus and his wife Veronica, our yard couple, sit there every Saturday afternoon after mowing our yard, enjoying a pitcher of iced tea. I had to knock it out pretty quickly. They are great people! When she first told me her name, and she doesn’t speak English, it was like Ver o nica. When I asked her to spell it, it was like our spelling of Veronica.
    2 points
  13. I finally had to replace a table that sat between two Adirondack chairs in our yard. Base is Cypress and the top is Western red cedar with 4 coats of Teak oil. Kind of hard to tell the difference between the two woods.
    2 points
  14. This boy is 14 years old, so his most athletic days are behind him.
    1 point
  15. I'm not sure I want villains as clients ... especially if they pay in "offers I can't refuse".
    1 point
  16. I didn't respond fast enough but I was goign to say it's probably because of the storms. If you had just stickered it and put some weight on it, it likely would have reversed. Oh well, you got there in the end. Attaching it to it's final home is probably the best way to keep it flat. It will continue to absorb and release moisture but the dresser you mounted it to will hold it flat.
    1 point
  17. It would probably work very well for that. I've never used liquid hide glue but i've heard good things.
    1 point
  18. Not sure @Coop, I believe 11 X 17 and about 7/8” thick was the most common one, some more narrow and longer
    1 point
  19. Now that’s sweet! What was your original glued up thickness? What are your’s and @treslayers final dimensions?
    1 point
  20. Did you use elongated holes for the screws on the ends and none on the front and back, to allow for movement? And flat head screws, preferably with washers?
    1 point
  21. Mr. Perez must have lost power too.
    1 point
  22. Well I got it where it needs to be attached and I don't think it is juvenile wood. I think this was my mistake of not letting air get to both sides during 3 days of tornadoes. It was the last thing on my mind.
    1 point
  23. Let your son know that he ha great taste in pocket knives :)
    1 point
  24. In the dead center of walnut is a pith. As if the center of the log was drilled from top to bottom 1/8".
    1 point
  25. Thank you! Many people to whom I show this chair say: I could never do this, my hands are crooked! It's actually much easier than it looks. Basic knowledge of working with wood/plywood and handling a small amount of tools is required. You need to know what and how to glue, polish and paint wood. You need to be able to use an electric manual grinder (you can grind manually, but an electric one is certainly easier), a manual router, a screwdriver. Previously, before the war, it was not even necessary to own it. There were places where you could come and rent the necessary tools and a workplace on which you could do the work right on the spot. Some of these places had their own CNC machines. Where could they convert your dxf file into a control program for a CNC machine and cut out everything you need. But then the "Russian world" came. And destroyed a lot. Sorry, I digress. Well, it's actually not as difficult as it seems. I think this is a great place to start. In fact, the manufacture of furniture consists of several stages. Among them, two are the creation of parts and assembly. A novice furniture maker does not have the experience and talent to create the details correctly and with high quality. The CNC will do it for him. The assembly process also has its own secrets and difficulties. But it's already much easier. In the assembly process, experience and understanding of the material will come, confidence in one's abilities. This is one way to start. And then the road of development is open before you. and it will take you where you want to go.
    1 point
  26. I joined the club today. Also picked up a couple screwdrivers. For all my disparagement of phillips and torx, somehow I only had driver bits for my beloved robertsons. So I decided to rectify that with some handtools. Something old, something new... Does Irwin make square drive screwdrivers?
    1 point
  27. I glue the blank down to the plywood using a piece of paper with PVA glue ... glue a piece of paper onto the plywood, and then glue the blank onto the paper ... I like to keep the glue away from any delicate edges. It would make sense to use a bigger piece of paper than the blank, with a small(ish) blob of glue, otherwise (as I did here) you have to be absolutely sure there is no squeeze out that will glue the blank directly to the ply. When it's time to remove it gently slide a knife blade (or chisel) between the ply and the carving (a bit of flex in the ply helps - and remember to stress the long grain of the carving som it won't break) and once the fibers in the paper start to rip it will pop off very easily ... a bit of scraping clears up the remaining paper/glue. You could of course screw the blank down if you were careful to use short enough screws. It would be better to use a square piece of ply, then it is easy to rotate the piece every 90 degrees to select the best angle to get the gouges onto the grain ... by using a rectangle I could only move it 180 degrees without adjusting the vice/dog ... but I didn't have appropriate size ply scraps. As for the guardian on top of the lintel ... It's a storage unit, it's going to accumulate things to store ... may as well start with a toy moose.
    1 point
  28. Thanks guys ... it provided challenges all the way, and at times my craftsmanship is not as good as I would like ... but I think the end result is what I was out to achieve, and I am pretty pleased with the final piece. I certainly don't need a concealed priest-hole ... but when I realised that this was an ideal location for a hidden door, and hidden doors are cool ... I had to take on the challenge.
    1 point
  29. Don't feel bad. Where I work, we have flat concrete sidewalks with OSHA approved railing systems. So people can't fall. ...off the sidewalk.
    1 point
  30. Spent some time building a railing for our deck stairs. Overkill for a single step, but we have some family with mobility issues so better safe than sorry. Also ordered some grab bars for a few transitions inside and the guest bathroom. We might even be in this house long enough to need them ourselves.
    1 point