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  1. Well many of you may remember I started this process awhile back. I wanted to redo the couch and sofa in our living room but was getting resistance from my wife, she was concerned about the comfort of these new pieces. Her main concern was the loveseat, it's where she mainly sits to read and watch the television. I knew I had some work to do to win her over. I started with the couch and shared that process with you last fall. Over the winter I got completely distracted with making fishing lures, but still was quietly plugging away at the design of the loveseat. Since it was going to have a wood frame I needed to figure out how to design it so the side she reclined on was comfortable enough for her. This took awhile and in the end I made an unique loveseat, where one side was designed differently than the other to hold a cushion in place. The construction was very similar to the couch but I changed a few things, mainly made the armrests higher, increased slightly the drop from the front to the back, went with softer seat cushions, and figured out how to add some vertical supports to the one armrest that would "hold" the cushion. The result was something that I was very pleased with and it is very comfortable, and most importantly I made my wife happy with the design. Here's a picture of the frame, sans the cushions; Here's a closer look at the armrest that holds the cushion; A quick shot with the seat cushions to show the difference in the armrests from side to side; And two final shots all assembled; So the conversion on the mid century modern look in my living room is almost complete. Now it's on to new endtables and a new coffee table. It's funny how one project can create others, but I'm not complaining.
    18 points
  2. Picked up some really nice canary wood recently and here are a couple of candle holders turned from one piece of each plank. Finish so far is just a couple of applications of clear stain. Not sure what topcoat I'll use on them. Red streaked one, about 5" diameter yellow one, about 3.5" diameter
    12 points
  3. So i've been trying to get together with a friends son for about 3 months to get a look at some wood he says he and his father milled a long tome ago, they have a kiln and a mill and i've been friends with his dad for over 40 years, but you know how these things go, is it good wood, properly taken care of, what's the price ect. well we got together yesterday and let me tell you i was blown away, this guy has tonnage of all types of wood, kiln dried, skip planed to 4/4 and stored inside huge buildings. these are pictures of his walnut and a couple of my lumber rack straining under the load, more in my storage shed. Now for the best part, walnut was $2.00 a BF, Cherry $1.50 and white oak $2.00, white oak was what he called "shorts" mostly 4' some 3' some 5' all was 4/4, you can see some of the walnut is 12" wide, i'd say this was a good day ! i have to find room to store some more !
    11 points
  4. Took a day off of woodworking and my wife and I went to the symphony at the Grand Opera House, very cool building built in 1890 and beautifully restored, music was awesome, Beethoven mostly
    11 points
  5. Found a good deal on this a few days ago and decided to take the plunge so I don't have to rely on a loaner.
    11 points
  6. I have been working on these little memory boxes and finally getting close to being done with them! Today I finally put on the hinges and added the top to the box. I put the hand cut dovetails on pause and used one of the old templates my uncle gave me a long time ago. It is amazing how many different skills a little box takes and it had a lot of firsts for me…this is the first box I have made and it was a ton of fun. First time for: making a box; dovetails on a box; installing hinges; and probably a lot more I am not thinking about. The box is made out of cherry, the first photo is raw and the second two are with the first coat of Danish oil. A few more coats and it will be all done. I ended up trying out the liquid hide glue on the box and I am a huge fan. Super easy cleanup and the glue does not show on the end grain like PVA glue can show if you miss some in the final sanding. @Chestnut thanks for the tip on the boxes; I have a Horizontal belt sander and I ended up hitting the top and bottom of the box for like a second and that worked perfectly to smooth out all of the edges. It took the “rock” out of the box and removed that little gap that I got when I put the bottom on the chisel box that I made in parallel with these boxes. Thanks to everyone else and all the little tips along the way as I could never have gotten this far without a little help and guidance.
    10 points
  7. The saga of the plane and cap irons came to a close today. Last night, I got a knock on the door. It was UPS with a package from Lee Valley, which puzzled me as I haven't ordered anything from them in the last month or so. The package turned out to be the cap irons from a 2/5/21 order that were back ordered. I had cancelled the irons awhile ago, but apparently the system didn't get it. Anyway, the last two irons arrived. I called their service line and explained what had happened and what I got, so I could return them to them. I am too much of a Boy Scout to cheat them out of them. The gent on the phone looked at my order, thought for a bit and said that for what I had gone through on this order, I could just keep them. Now that is customer service! Will definitely be ordering from Lee Valley again, especially since one of my kids gave me a gift card for them.
    10 points
  8. Azaleas, Dogwoods, and Lilacs are in full bloom. Leaves are all out, and still the early tender green color. Two young litters of puppies in the house. Bermuda grass is turning green, and waiting for the badly needed inch of soaking rain that's on the way, and today is my Mother's 106th Birthday, and Pam's and my 42nd Anniversary. All are healthy. Couldn't ask for more.
    10 points
  9. "Rise and Defend" A nation at peace, forced to bare teeth. I apologize to @AWBox. The colors are not quite right for the Ukraine flag. These were as close as I could find. A very simple piece, but I like how it came out.
    9 points
  10. Here is a my first try at 3D carving. The design isn't mine. I wish I was talented enough. I bought it off etsy. Took 28 hours not including the first failed attempt which took 14 hours.
    8 points
  11. Whew! Feels like it's been a slog getting to this point, but things are finally feeling like some real progress has happened. After the <BLEEP> insulation job above I took a couple weeks off, before trying again with a recommendation from an acquaintance for a company that "wasn't run by morons back when I was in the biz". And thankfully that was still the case, as they did a bang-up job. I decided to bite the bullet and get 3" spray foam. Do it right or pay twice. In progress shot. Two guys got the whole roof done in a long day. They did leave the scissor lift behind for a week, but that was an issue with the rental company not the installers. I also got some use out of it, installing two electrical cord reels on the trusses while it was there. After they got the ceiling done, I put in an order for 5.5" thick mineral wool batts. The delivery included forklifting the palets into my shop, which was very much appreciated. With some help from my inlaws I got the walls 90% insulated in about 3 days. There's one or two bays I'm holding off on for other tasks (like installing a window and running dust collection pipe). In-between the insulation stages, I cleaned my floors and refit the existing rubber mats better, before fixing them in place (I left room for expansion) with a couple of tapcon screws and brass bushings along the front edge. This helps keep them from shifting around when driving a vehicle in and out of the shop. I don't remember where I read about this tip, but I can 100% recommend it. Next step is going to be covering the lower 8' of wall with t1-11. I bought a pallet from the big orange store, which should wrap the lower shop area. I'll switch to hardboard (pre-primed white) for the top 4' of wall that this plywood won't cover. At that height I'm not worried about being able to screw into any spot. And, as is apparently tradition, some bonus wild (and not so wild) life. Flushed this little (~3") guy out while mowing around the shop.
    8 points
  12. Just sharing for the fun of it. I love it when a hand-me-down tool comes with a story. I was using these today and realized my uncle had given them to me 50 years ago. He ended his career designing and making prototypes for jet fighter seats. These hung from his belt for cutting leather and naugahyde. He also entered a seat design for Disneyland's Monorail but, didn't make the cut . . . pun intended. I have used these for decades. They currently hang just inside one of the swing-out doors of my wall mounted tool cabinet.
    7 points
  13. I've had folks ask about cutting the tops off of the boxes in previous threads. I took a few extra shots and hope this will help someone out. The process for this type of box is basically make all the parts and glue up the box as a 6-sided cube. Then you cut the top off. After that you can add hinges, make it a lift-lid or whatever you like. The following process is done after you have planed any proud fingers or tails/pins flush and done some initial surface prep on the box. That is, you do not want the box changing dimensions significantly after you cut the top off. The top of the box will ride against the fence. I have done a fair amount of surface prep on this figured walnut so I add a couple of strips of tape for protection. The little blocks you see are about 4" long, 1/2" thick and have a perpendicular strip set in lengthwise that matches my blade's kerf. I have three of these. The blade is set about 1/32" higher than the box sides are thick. For the first cut I clamp on a backer board. Flip the box over and insert one of the "kerf keeper" blocks. You will notice that I have taped the block in position. I come from the school of "secure your load" (even if it is just a shovel in the back of the pickup) so I secure the block. Should anything unexpected happen the block will not become a projectile. With the first cut toward you, make the second cut. Rinse and repeat until you have three blocks taped in place and one side left to be cut. Cut the last side, remove the tape and blocks and here you go. Even if your box is a smidge out of square your top will hinge perfectly. Three more to go.
    7 points
  14. Will do. Waiting for my dust monitor to come in so I can actually monitor things. Found a free marble slab right by my house so I threw it on top of some plywood and the hairpins legs I bought for a temporary coffee table. Also here are the shelves I hung up last weekend.
    7 points
  15. I started playing with the prototype for 'Spin-a-ma-Jig' 2.0: This rendition is far stiffer and safer than version 1.0. Here is a scrap glue-up I started milling. I don't suggest this as a lathe substitute, by any means. But, since I have no lathe and no space to add one, it does let me experiment with a little round woodwork.
    7 points
  16. My wife has entered my shop on occasion when I least expect it and scares the crap out of me. That causes static and burns me up! Does that count?
    7 points
  17. Another project of mine. One of the first. Many mistakes))) But it turned out not a bad chair. Practical. Works well to this day. Now I would make such a chair differently. Developed a 3d model. Almost all plywood details. All moving parts on cross-section screeds. Photo of the finished chair
    7 points
  18. I build for Myself and that guy is a total jerk. Always criticizing the smallest details of my work and changing his ideas on the fly. Plus he never pays up.
    7 points
  19. Does this count as mail? Got the rockwool insulation for my shop walls delivered today.
    7 points
  20. I’m in the shop today with all doors open and I faintly see some movement outside the door. There is a 8’ length of 4” pvc in front of my garage and upon looking inside, I see this feller. I’ll take him to a local wildlife refuge in the morning. In the mean time, I gave him some dry dog food.
    7 points
  21. Decided to make a little twig pot for my wife from a chunk of off cut walnut from a recent table built in the shop. Turned out pretty nice. Need quite a bit more practice when it come to design but for it being the first one I'll chalk it up as a win. Cheers!
    7 points
  22. This evenings saw dust creation.
    6 points
  23. I don't know that it matters but I misspoke when I said the tray was maple and walnut. This one is all walnut, it just happened to be some sappy walnut. The other trays have maple parts and I got corn-fused. The cut offs from resawing the scraps to thickness will give me some thin stock for tray supports. Bonus, the figure matches. I had pre-finished the insides of the boxes so these supports get glued in with some E6000. And you end up here. I normally use felt pads but for the shop I added these rubber bumpers as feet. This guy will set by the door and hold my shop specs. I think I have beat this topic to death but I'll circle back and post the other three boxes when they are complete.
    6 points
  24. You would think I was doing the restoration on Notre Dame with the amount of pics and posts on this project. I am getting older and slower so this helps me feel like I am making headway . The maple box is only finished with shellac so it is done quicker than the others. Here's my method for attaching this type of pull; a surface adhesive method. I apply some tape, choose the position, and trace part of the shape as a reference. I snip a couple of small bits of copper wire (small dowels or whatever will work), drill receiver holes for them and tap them in. The sharp tips left from being snipped with dykes act like dowel centers. I press the pull onto the spikes and this marks the locations for the holes on the pull for me. A bit of tape in case of squeeze out, a bit of epoxy, and a clamp. I've failed to remember to refresh my ZCI "the next time I use epoxy" a few times now. Finally remembered and mixed a bit more than I needed, laid a strip of packing tape on the surface, flipped the ZCI over, and drizzled epoxy into the slot to restore it. I plan to keep the smaller box and use it to store my Rx shop glasses and other small paraphernalia. I built a little tray to hold the glasses on top. This is just a rabbeted maple box with a rabbeted bottom to accept a walnut panel. With this thin stock I chose to round the corners of the panel rather than chisel the corners of the rabbets square. Ta-da. A little glue and a gravity clamp.
    6 points
  25. Can confirm, lathe work can be addictive. I was feeling a lot of pent-up energy today. While I've been spending a lot of time out in the shop, it hasn't been actually making anything aside from the shop itself. So I decided to spend some time today just playing on the lathe. I remembered I had a bag of pen kits laying around, so I whipped out a small selection. From left to right, the woods are: English Laurel, unknown (bloodwood?), Hard Maple, and Lilac.
    6 points
  26. This has turned into another job on hold. The swiveling 6" casters take a lot of space to swing. I could cobble up something that would work, but the easy way was to order a piece of steel. I needed a 5/8" x 4"x 18" piece of plate. ebay had exactly that size, so I just ordered it. That piece will weld to the long support angles, and sections of heavy 2" angle iron welded to the back of that to tie it to the 5" angle that the rear casters swivel under. Those vertical supports will have to be far enough inboard to stay out of the way of the swivels. For a lot of things, I don't do a lot of planning. I'll just stage it as I build it, and measure off of that. One side has a smaller angle iron so the lower bandsaw door can open. It's not really needed for strength to be any larger. There was already more big angle here than the smaller stuff, so I used it. Floor clearance for this is 1-1/4". I have to roll it over a slope change at the edge of this building floor to the ramp outside. I want to be able to roll it outside. I have a dedicated 2hp DC for it, but dust collection is not the best, so it will just be blown off with a leaf blower before bringing it back inside. I used the drill press to drill the holes in these angles for the casters. I set the trashcan under it to catch the shavings. The roughneck trashcan sits perfectly on that big flat angle at the front, so I'll just make that the place to leave it, which will free up a few square feet in that building. It's pretty junky in there still. I'm working on it when I can-bought some more toolboxes today.
    6 points
  27. No earthquakes here but I do have two husky's and no issues with my case on stand since 2018 and counting
    6 points
  28. I’ve personally met 6 of the members here and still cherish those meetings. There are several that I wish I had met before they moved on and hope to meet more that are still here. Great group!
    6 points
  29. This is one of the doors for a free standing cabinet. I had a moment and cut this one too narrow. I didn't want to spend $150 on another sheet of plywood, so I took this as a sign from the universe the I should get creative. So I put in this accent piece to give me the required width. There are a couple of first here for me. I've never done complementary curves before and this one is a little more complex because the accent piece is not the same width from top to bottom. At this stage I've roughed out the shape I want and now will do some surface texture carving. It's been challenging, but this is the most fun I've had in the shop for a long time.
    6 points
  30. Creating a thread for discussion of my findings from the dust detector i bought a while back. After seeing some experiments from Mattias Wandel, I have a bit more confidence with the detector. The model he is using is similar if not the same the only difference is he has his modified to collect the data with a raspberry pi computer. I've posted about this in other threads but i can't remember where and it's probably a hijack of the original thread. As other forum users have the meter I figured a thread to discuss findings could be helpful to help people determine what would help improve shop air quality. I ran the meter a bit in the kitchen as I've read multiple reports that gas stoves are terrible for indoor air quality. What I found was cooking in general is terrible for indoor air quality. After cooking a breakfast for 6, the air quality was very poor. The small particles skyrocketed and reached an absurd number. Leaving the meter in place it took nearly 12 hours for the air to clear up to a level that was below 1,000 and 24 hours to return to a base line value of pretty much zero. I was curious to see how much just burning gas would add to the particle count. So on a cool day i ran 2 burners on high for 15 min to see if the particle count started to rise. At the end of 15 min the particle meter had maybe increased slightly but it's pretty clear that food particles are mostly to blame for indoor kitchen air quality. There was some discussion on if the meter can pick up particles from VOCs and other harmful small substances and my answer is a resounding YES. I'll post more information on that below. From my research NOx particles range from 0.05 um to 0.5um which would indicate that this meter would at least be able to pick up some of the emissions from burning natural gas. I'm not saying that it's safe I'm just saying that the emissions from burning the fuel pale in comparison to the food being cooked. I full advocate in installing and using an externally vented range hood regardless of the fuel used to cook. After the kitchen test i placed the meter around my house with the last spot being right out side my basement shop door. I wanted to see what the impacts of long woodworking sessions would be on air quality in the rest of the house. It turns out that it has had very little impact. When directly outside my open shop door the particle counts bumped up to 500-750 on 0.3um and 100 on 1.0 um. For comparison sake numbers inside my shop have been as high as 5,000-6,000 oddly no where near the kitchen level. While inside my shop the interesting part of the meter is that the worst thing I can do dust wise is sweep. While sweeping I observed the peak numbers that are above. The other oddity is that dust was NOT visible in the air. The second worst numbers occurred while i was doing hand sanding and brushing the fine dust from 220 grit paper away, or using my mouth to blow it away. Following hand sanding all other options were about equal increasing shop dust levels to 300-500 on the 0.3um level. Interestingly enough just running my dust cyclone I was able to clean the air from a the sweeping level of 6,000 down to 30 in a matter of 15 min. For reference my shop is 750 square feet and has only 1 furnace vent that I keep closed and 1 air return. Now to the interesting part, VOCs and how i KNOW this meter can detect them. I left the meter running in my shop after I applied coats of Minwax Wipe on Poly to the in-laws dining table. While the finish was curing and you could smell it the 0.3 um number was never below 1,000, it rose to this number after using my dust collector to reduce the particle count to 30. Nothing else was being used in the shop and it held this level for 3 -4 days which was how long it took me to apply finish. The second VOC occurrence was using spray adhesive to upholster some headline panels for my jeep. When using the spray adhesive in my shop the 0.3 um count jumped to 3,000. That is really near what hand sanding put into the air except these are VOCs and likely more harmful. If any one else has some interesting observations please share them. This is just interesting from an observation stand point. For piratical sense it's goign to leave me running my dust collector more frequently. I will also start opening the vent in my shop to circulate the clean air into the rest of the house. For comparison sake the baseline is about 100 0.3um for the house vs 0-30 0.3um in my shop. This is all probably pointless and foolish but hey more information is always better than less.
    6 points
  31. Aren't most of them yours .
    6 points
  32. Snagged a pair of surplussed flatfile drawers. Should make great storage.
    6 points
  33. I pop in and out of a jeep forum that has the kind of traffic of those facebook groups. Every other day is the same content and after following for 2 weeks it's just endless repetition of the same thing. While the heavily beaten paths can have a lot of posts, it doesn't provide motivation to members to create informative content with valuable tips and tricks much less post about one of a kind designs for random furniture. They almost always turns into which tool should I buy, or Help XYZ tool is out of alignment, or Help! i screwed up this finish because i over complicated things by mixing 10 chemicals together. The best part about this hidden gem of a form is all the project ideas I get here. If forums are dead I'm glad, having the activity of instabook meta face would just make it a miserable place to post. I tried to use Marc's new guild forum and it was awful. It was just endless posts about tools or work benches, both topics have been beaten to dead everywhere.
    6 points
  34. I am of the humble (or maybe not) opinion that facebook is a terrible substitute for a forum. If you compare the content of the content here vs the WoodWhisperer facebook group, well, there's just no comparison. The facebook group is just a huge time suck trying to find content of any value. Similar results with other types of forums/groups.
    6 points
  35. when the County Property Tax Revaluation vehicle is a Porsche SUV. It just came in here while I was out cutting grass.
    6 points
  36. This is on the bench, the table saw, the outfeed table and most of the empty space in my shop, LOL. Kitchen counter top for the cabin.
    6 points
  37. Several years ago we were visiting a lavender farm and encountered a gentleman selling plants. We got several lilies and irises and planted them. The lilies sprouted and bloomed quickly but the irises were much slower. This spring the sprouted bud stems and a couple of days ago I walked out to find blooms open.
    6 points
  38. Leigh dovetail jig came today!
    6 points
  39. Now that it’s warmer, I set up a small outdoor pen for our chicks to spend some time outside. Wire roof because the hawks have been very active.
    6 points
  40. Any of you who subscribe to Fine Woodworking Online probably saw this as I did. I have some duplicate toy items planned and thought this might be an asset so I took one for the team. The idea of template sanding is similar to template sawing at the tablesaw with an "L" fence or offset template routing with a template collar. I used a scrap of melamine leftover from a closet project I helped a neighbor with. Size yours however you like. A slot is cut for a fence. I placed mine so that I had an approximate 3/8" offset from the disc sander's surface. Although you can get quite accurate with a sander there is always the discrepancy of grit size, backing material and bonding method. I set mine up for my coarsest paper assuming finer papers (if used) will leave the blank proud of the line. I've found it a lot easier to remove more material than to put material back on ;) A "bar" is attached to use the miter slot for positioning as well as a stop to keep the "table" in place. If your sander does not have a miter slot you can make the table oversized and add stops to capture the machine's table and orient the fixture. As per my usual, when I made the fence I made a couple of extra. So if I need to sand to a line on a dozen parts I just hold or double stick tape the template in a position that is at the correct offset; 3/8" in my version. For convex curves the method is the same as for template sawing or non-flush template routing. The template has to provide the required offset. The benefit is that once you make a template you just use it as many times as you need to for your project. As with most jigs in the new shop this one gets a 1-1/8" hole so it will hang on the wall. If you use melamine be sure to ease the edges to avoid cutting your hands while handling.
    6 points
  41. I put this edge guide on my table saw. It's shimmed out to be perfectly parallel with and exactly 580mm from the edge of the blade. By clamping a straight edge to a long wide board I can accurately and cleanly cut it on the table saw. I've made a few cuts already and it works wonderfully. If you have a good track saw & blade, this isn't really needed. But I just have a circular saw with a straight edge and I can't get as clean a cut as with the table saw, particularly with veneered or melamine sheet goods.
    6 points
  42. As promised, pics with finish applied. This is a pretty simple way to form a shallow tray that looks nice. Might have to make a few more with differen wood species. Thanks to @treeslayer for posting the original inspiration!
    6 points
  43. This comes up so often I thought I would post (probably again, sorry) how I do this. The felt pen labeled block of wood is what I used to use to hold a mill file at 90 degrees to mill the scraper's edges. It is just a milled scrap of ash. The extra slot at the far end is meaningless. It just happened to be in the piece of scrap when I chose it. I got a Veritas file holder somewhere along the way and it is pretty idiot proof for straight edges. The other block of wood just helps me keep the card perpendicular to the stone when stoning the edges. I start by removing any remaining hook by stoning the faces near the edges, both sides, all edges. I then mill each edge. Normally I hold the scraper and the file in my hands but, I have to hold the camera As mentioned I use the block of wood, any milled scrap will do, to help me consistently stone the edges on a coarse stone (about 200 grit) and then a fine (about 600 grit). What I am after is a smooth even "face" for the full length of the edge. I then pull the edges with a burnishing rod. The Veritas tri-burnisher has become my go-to. It really excels at curved scrapers but is good overall. For hooking straight edges the Veritas (what is this!?! a Lee Valley ad???) burnisher is another idiot-proof helper. A burnishing rod will do fine too. I do a 5 to 10 degree hook for a couple of passes. Over working the hook step causes a lot of folks issues I think. After the few-minute process your card scraper does this. All the Veritas items are just helpers. I got along fine before I had them.
    5 points
  44. I made myself an espresso tamper a couple years ago, but the original walnut handle I made broke off not long after. I set it aside planning to fix it in a day or two... Fast forward about 14 months and I finally got around to turning a new handle. About as simple a project as they get, but eminently satisying nonetheless. Especially since I'll be using this thing 2-3 times a day. Just a simple chunk of curly maple epoxied to the existing tamper base. The base is made out of some old brass roundstock I inherited from my grandfather and had laying around. It's a bit dinged up from clamping it back into the jaws of my chuck, but I didn't have a great way to clean up the sides afterwards.
    5 points
  45. More experimenting with 'Spin-a-ma-Jig". While I had it over the saw, I lowered the blade to barely clear the insert, and 'faced off' the bottom of the dish. Then I put in vertical mode for some hand work. End-grain sanding is sloooooow, so I switched to scraping. Sorry the pic is rotated. Scraping worked much better after I ditched the hand wheel and turned it with a drill. Lots of creative clamping to hold the drill motor and squeeze the trigger. Now it is effectively a lathe headstock setup for outboard turning. A really, really crappy lathe headstock. I actually have an old tube-bed lathe, with a burned-out motor, and a frozen tail stock. I'm now thinking it would be good to cannabalize that headstock and rig it as shown above, so I can use a much better faceplate and bearings. I can really see the attraction to turning. Just spinning this chunk at low speed and scraping it smooth was very satisfying.
    5 points
  46. The second time I changed the oil in Pam's Subaru, I changed the drain plug to a Fumoto valve. The drain plug is up in a recess, and it was impossible to get the plug out without running oil on something, including down my arm. The Fumoto valve is well protected up in there, and the chance of it malfunctioning approaches zero from anything hitting it. You have to pull a flat piece straight down against pretty good spring pressure, and turn it into a slot. I needed pliers, as the spring was too strong for my fingers up in there. I also got the adapter to slide a clear hose onto it. Pictures should be self explanatory. I like the location for the oil filter up in the engine bay, on top. There is a big "cup" that surrounds the gasket, so no oil runs down on the engine. I run the front wheels up on ramps in the shop. The drained oil gets put back in the container the new oil came in, and carried to the back of an auto parts store, or Walmart, and left with other peoples oil to be recycled. I had bought a funnel that was supposed to fit a Subaru, but it must have been designed for old one. The GM one fits tight enough not to leak. I like the Fumoto valve even better than I thought I would. Didn't get a drop of oil on anything. The clear hose just slides on, and off.
    5 points
  47. The welding was the quick part. A 5 year old child can move the drill press now. It's very stable. My priorities were easy to move, close to the floor-actually raised only 3/4", and stable. All required points well fulfilled. I put the swivel casters with locks on the back, so they wouldn't be sticking out in the way of feet. All you have to do is activate one of the locks to stabilize it, so it doesn't matter if one locking lever is up under the back angle. This one is made from 5x5x1/4 and 3x3x1/4 angle iron, and a leftover scrap of 1/2" plate. It doesn't flex. Fasteners were left over from a past boat business. All I bought was the set of casters, and a few feet of MIG wire. I thought I'd made it too small. It rubbed going down into the base, but it did go all the way down. It's more steady than it was just sitting on it's own base. These are 4" casters. The bandsaw with get 6" ones. I was able to wrangle the big bandsaw out where I hope to glue that one together tomorrow. This is a Powermatic 1150 that I use in the mechanic/metal shop. It would look out of place if I had painted it anyway. I only care that the holes it drills are pretty. It would make a good start for a base with a cabinet on it, but the to-do list is beyond manageable anyway. I need this and the big bandsaw to make handrails for the rental house, so I decided to go ahead and build these. I'm having to squeeze time in to work on these as it is. I park the tractor with loader and mower on the back in there. When I work on something, I have to back the tractor out, and move stuff around like a slide puzzle. This will make the pieces easier to move out, and put back.
    5 points
  48. Wife & son's cars were in the garage. I missed the storm while commuting home, so my truck is fine as well.
    5 points
  49. I am using a large diameter bit so I switch to the thicker router fence faces. I don't really need a bit this big but it has the profile I want. Once the tops are profiled I groove the edges as the first step in the joinery. I use a .125" kerf blade that leaves a flat bottom. I then trim back the underside to leave a 3/16" tongue all the way around. Using the method I did for adding the panel receiver grooves on the sides of the box gets me a rounded corner. These can be chiseled out or you can round corners. With the scale of these I will just round the corners. Yet another use for an old card. It only takes a few swipes with the rasp to round the corners. One end of the panel goes in a pin board. Another end. Add the tail boards and this is what it looks like just loosely pushed together. The inside view of the top and bottom will look like so. Dinner time . . .
    5 points