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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/20/20 in Posts

  1. I just completed a kitchen renovation. It took 51 days and mostly with out surprises but there were a couple of things that added to the adventure. One was some water damage around the sink and dishwasher but I was expecting this as we had some dishwasher problems about three years ago and this required some subfloor replacement. The other was when the counter tops were installed I had to move the plumbing around under the sink to line up with the new drain locations and the way the new garbage disposal installed. This was no big deal, I just don't like plumbing. Just because I am at
    11 points
  2. Just to be clear, I do agree that board feet would be the most accurate, IF referring to the square feet X depth of cut. I like the bushel idea too. Just thought of another irritating term: "vertical grain fir". For some reason it usually used for fir, not other woods. And what the hell does that mean any way? When it's a tree, yes the grain is vertical, as is when used in a vertical orientation. But you spend all that extra cash of VG fir, take it home, lay it on the bench, & suddenly it's not vertical grain anymore
    5 points
  3. Actually there are two walk-in closets in the 16’x16’ space. And yes, the reason for the build to begin with is to allow for wheel chair accessibility should the need ever arise. The shower (no tub) is 4’x7’ with no curb. Shoot, we could have showered with friends if we had done this 50 years ago! Yeah, they showed today like they said!
    5 points
  4. Holy that's slow. I issue permits in under an hour. I usually have them reviewed and approved before the person leaves the office. I hope the addition goes smoothly looks like it's going to add a good amount of space for you. It's all shop space right?
    5 points
  5. I knocked these out today using Lexan. Sort of fun. Sort of interesting. But definitely useful. They are 2 1/4" in the face, and 1 1/2" over the top. Ratios 5:1, 6:1, and 7:1 (I find 8:1 too flat). There is also a saddle square. If there is interest, I'll post a build. Nice items to make as Christmas presents Regards from Perth Derek
    5 points
  6. Thanks for asking. She's not improving very much. Still mostly paralyzed on one side from the stroke. One of us has to be here all the time, so it slows both of us up from doing what we normally do. It's taken my wonderful Wife about this long, I think about four months now, to get her medication right, so that she will sleep all night. It'll just be the three of us for Thanksgiving, this time. We do what we have to do.
    5 points
  7. Not really in the mail but via slow moving turtle. We are adding on to the back of the house and submitted plans for a permit in late August. The city finally issued a permit three weeks ago and the inspector, bless his heart, finally showed today and approved the form and steel. We get concrete tomorrow!!!
    5 points
  8. Finished up the DP table today, just needs a couple coats of poly on the edge. The smaller table provides more room for the mortiser I bought earlier this year and matches the router table becuase well that's important right
    5 points
  9. What other joinery methods are you considering? M&T is definitely not overkill, it's the accepted method of construction for this type a piece. And as mentioned above, a dovetail on the top aprons would add even more mechanical strength. I don't know if you subscribe to Fine Woodworking or not, but Mike Pekovich wrote an excellent article on making a side table from a single board that is a great primer for this type of table. I use it as a project in my intro classes.
    5 points
  10. I think red oak looks great painted. That hint of grain that shows through is quite attractive. I made a fireplace surround for my daughter out of red oak & sprayed it gloss black. It turned out beautifully & is much more interesting than if it was perfectly smooth.
    4 points
  11. It didn't come in the mall but i bought s 14/12 on black Friday sale from acme. The 10% plus the free resaw king was just too tempting. I wanted a 10" saw but after i considered the space it would take up and the small table i started considering 14" saws. I missed a powermatic 14" for cheaper but this might be better. I'm still working on the garage so i just shoved it in my shed which has gotten awfully full.
    4 points
  12. I've owned and used the Stanley #51/52 for over a decade now ... There is a write up of the restoration here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolRestorations/Restoring a Stanley 5152.html Since the frog is fragile, I purchased one of the first Lie Nielsen #51 shooting planes when it was produced. This was based on the Stanley #51 ... Currently, the #52 shooting board is used mainly with the Veritas Shooting Plane ... Regards from Perth Derek
    4 points
  13. I ended up going overboard. I bought the Knew Concepts Titanium saw because i thought it looked cool and why not? The saw will last me and many other people a lifetime. As an engineer i love the truss design on the back of the saw. I can't believe how incredibly light this thing is. Haven't gotten to use it yet though but i have quite a few dovetails in some up coming projects so it'll see good use soon enough.
    4 points
  14. Been busy doing a last minute garage sheetrock and finish. There are too many unknowns with Covid that we are deciding to do our wedding reception at our house with a reduced guest list. I have 25 days to get this finished. Insulation is 75% done. I have a couple outlets to add tonight and then should have all the prep done. I'm doing this fast and not planned as well as I'd like. I'm 100% sure future me is goign to be upset with past me for a snap decision I made that was wrong.
    4 points
  15. Spent some more time on my DP table today First I cleaned up the edges of the maple banding. @Coop I did this and the curved corner below on the edge sander, you had asked the other day what I use that machine for, stuff like this Next up I cut the laminate to size on the table saw, the aluminum piece is to insure it doesn't slide under the fence and ruin my day. Then contact cement on both pieces, let it dry, and stick them together Now to add a little edge design to match my router table top FYI if there is anyone in the MP
    4 points
  16. To finish out this thread, I appreciate Coop's attempt to help. That screw was not the problem. I contacted Bosch who handles service for Skilsaw these days and spoke to an engineer. I knew the saw was out of warranty, but I was just looking for guidance on why it was not working. I sent photos and a video, but he didn't know what was wrong either. So he said, pack it up and send it back. Even though it was out of warranty, he volunteered that they would fix it. This, despite that Bosch will no longer support Skilsaw after December 2020. He could have easily blown me off. He sent the
    4 points
  17. I was asked to explain how I go about sharpening my bandsaw blades, and finally got around to putting together a couple of photos. Let me say first that I did not invent this method. It is widely used. I learned it on YouTube, that font of all important wisdom The fixture is new, and really thrown together in about 20 minutes. Before this, for a number of years, I would simply freehand this process. That worked well. Eventually .. recently .. I decided a fixture would offer more reliable results and less hand fatigue. Well, I think that this is so. The main tool is
    4 points
  18. Probably the same people who run around North America babbling about 110 and 220 volts . Fi on them I say. Seriously, I agree with TPT Life. It's the fence side of the cutter that will see the most use and drive the need for sharpening. So the best measure is lineal/linear feet. Unless, of course, the wood is ipe, in which case it would be linear inches, or maybe mm.
    3 points
  19. Regarding cutter life, it makes sense to refer to lineal or square feet. But technically speaking, the entire volume of material 'passes through' the machine, so board feet is a proper measurement. But does either measure truly illustrate the work done? Maybe we should state machine activity in terms of bushels of shavings produced.
    3 points
  20. Got the 3 1/2 hp Milwaukee from Acme. Their website was overwhelmed but got a phone order in after a 20 minute wait!
    3 points
  21. Ross, The paint I used is a Benjamin Moore product. At first I was going to pore fill all the existing oak cabinets but after talking with the guys at the Benjamin Moore store they thought I might get away with out the pore fill. I did a sample test on one of the old doors following their suggested routine - I washed them with a solution of simple green and water, they recommend not using TSP, rinsed the surface twice just to make sure there wasn't any remaining soap. Then I scuff sanded the surface with 150 grit to dull the surface, primed it, lightly sanding that with 220 then two coats
    3 points
  22. I dug around in my Cope toolbox today, and took some pictures. My favorite Coping saw is a Disston 10B that I bought new. I have no idea when they stopped selling them, but I expect I bought it in the early '70's. The handle is a perfect size, and shape, for both pulling, pushing, and fine control. The coping saw blades that I remembered being in a paper envelope are Nicolson brand. They're the best I've ever used, and I bought all the hardware store had in stock. I remember where I was working on my Greandfather's house in 1975. I broke my last blade, and went to a local hardware s
    3 points
  23. For those that haven’t seen it.I too utilize the shelf on the stand. It’s where I store the bag and hose. The ant bait doesn’t figure into the formula.
    3 points
  24. I got my 36” granberg alaskan mill in the mail. Not I just need to get a saw for it!
    3 points
  25. Do you mean a simple butt joint? If so that will never work. A butt joint offers very little surface for glue to bond, and worse than that, one of the surfaces is end grain and wood glues perform very poorly on end grain. The whole art of joinery is to produce connections that have a lot of surface area that has long grain wood fibers mating with other long grain wood fibers.
    3 points
  26. There are a couple of ways to deal with tenons that would interfere inside the leg. The tenons can be mitered where they would intersect, or they can be "haunched", so that both tenons are full width at their base, but have the opposite corners notched out at the end so that the overlap inside the intersecting mortices. A third option for the top apron is to use a dovetail that slips in from the top of the leg. Since it doesn't rely on glue surface area for strength, it can be much shorter than a straight tenon.
    3 points
  27. On PBS, is on work to rebuild Notre Dame. Sorry, no more details. I just happened to see it listed on the TV guide.
    2 points
  28. I really like the colors...! Great job Chet
    2 points
  29. Hickory does a number on any balde as well.
    2 points
  30. Wish there was a better gauge as I can’t afford curly hard maple
    2 points
  31. Run a board of curly hard maple and that should be a good gauge.... if it has more tearout than you expect it's time to change?
    2 points
  32. Lineal feet, BF, square feet-what I want is an hour meter on my planer because if it’s running I’m throwing boards at it.
    2 points
  33. Thats a pretty nice bathroom for a patio.
    2 points
  34. https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/654432208559682/?ref=browse_tab&referral_code=undefined Or should that be "chuting"?
    2 points
  35. I use a 2x8, angle irons are screwed to the underside of the guide board. These angle irons help keep your board straight, helps reinforce your board so it doesn't sag, and lifts the board off the log (allowing for working around protuberances and branches). Like @Chestnut I use 2 or 3 screws to secure the board to the log. Shimming the board is often necessary also. My guide board is 8 ft long, I usually mill logs between 7 and 5 ft long, easier to manage. Here are some pics of the board in action on some smallish logs; Some guys use ladders or other setups for their f
    2 points
  36. I recently bought the DeWalt DW735X with a stand at Rockler. Because I work in a small space all of my tools need to be portable and as compact as possible because space is a premium. The stand in my opinion is wasted valuable space. I have decided to make a few modifications to make it work better. The first thing I was planning was putting a chip recovery box in the stand. The box would be vented on top with a filter. The other thing I planning on doing was adding folding extension wings that are 26"-27" long. The feed tables on the wings would be adjustable so they can be levele
    2 points
  37. Wheels rely on an exact fit between the hub & the hole in the wheel for a full strength connection between the two. The lug nuts don't do the whole job. I think tape will either peel off or compress some, which will give sloppy results. Getting a layer of tape the exact thickness will be a challenge as well. Remember, any error in tape thickness will be doubled in the final diameter of the hole. Do it right & take the wheels to a machine shop & have them bore out the centers.
    2 points
  38. No. Just work faster when the motor is running. Regards from Perth Derek
    2 points
  39. Well, happy day when I pick up chairs from my upholstery guy. Very happy with the result, the fabric looks really sharp with the cherry. The chairs are very comfortable, very comfortable. Couldn't be happier with these. So lets put a bow on this build; I'm in the middle of building two more out of walnut, I'll show those when done. It was fun to get back into building chairs. Thanks for looking,
    2 points
  40. Thanks Paul for your thoughts. My brother has a Bostitch and I tried his and it worked great on some scrap hardwood so I ordered one yesterday.
    1 point
  41. Nice score Drew I’m sure you’ll put it to good use
    1 point
  42. Looks great, Chet! Any tips to share on painting the ubiquitous 1980s - 1990s red oak for a smooth finish? My kitchen is going to need a facelift, probably sooner than later.
    1 point
  43. Dave, I think what makes me skeptical of this is that the force of the chips coming out of a 735, hitting a ridgid flex hose, and only going 2 or 3 feet, and stopping quickly, is going to cause a wearing of that flex hose, and with such a sudden stop, it's going to blow dust and possibly the box all over the place. I could very well be wrong, in fact I hope I am. But I know how hard and far that 735 blows chips.
    1 point
  44. Negative pressure is a frame of reference, does the impeller create negative pressure or positive pressure? It more accurately creates negative pressure before the impeller and positive pressure after. In impeller systems pressure is relative to RPM and as induction motors spin at the same RPM theoretically the pressure is static, but this is incredibly complicated and works in theory but not in practice. The difference can be significant. In practice as airflow increases static suction decreases where the highest static pressure is at 0 CFM of flow. Dust collectors are sized to work best with
    1 point
  45. Disclaimer: This comment is based on hearsay, not personal experience. When rotating the carbide cutters, it is ABSOLUTELY IMPERATIVE to clean the cutter, the screw, and the surface of the head to remove ALL particulates. The tiniest bit of wood dust will prevent the cutter from seating properly, producing a mark in tbe cut. A larger or harder particle can even allow the carbide cutter to crack when tightened. If you did all that, then perhaps there is a variation in cutter manufacture? The maker of the head may have advice to offer.
    1 point
  46. It looks like it may work. I am not sure my hose would reach but that can be replaced. It would have to pull out on the side with the crank handle due to the mobile base wheel.
    1 point
  47. Do you have a table saw? A bandsaw? A skill saw? Cutting tenons can be done easy with any one of those tools. It does take patience though. And always cut them slightly bigger in all directions, and tune them down with either a shoulder plane, a Stanley #78 or a flat wood rasp.
    1 point
  48. How boring would the world be if we were all like minded...I truly miss Eric, Shane, Steve etc, etc, etc we have lost a lot of great folks with a bundle of knowledge and expertise. Luckily like the US, even with our issues, its still the best damn woodworking forum out there and for that I say thanks to all that participate!!
    1 point
  49. Thanks.. I'd be happy to answer whatever questions you may have. I knew Sam well and spent some good amount of time with him. I also knew all 3 of his helpers and still stay in touch with 2 of them now. I guess since I have been making these pieces for years and had access to Sam and the boys to ask questions, I learned a lot over the years and just became proficient at it I guess..
    1 point
  50. Thank you all so much for the welcome.. Much appreciated.. This chair is a copy of a prototype that Sam made. I knew Sam well (since my 20's) There were several things Sam wanted to change on the chair, but passed before being able to make them. I saw all 3 of the newly designed chairs when they were being shown at his exhibit at his home. I have not seen the chairs displayed since. Sam was kind enough to make me copies of his templates when he saw that I could not afford one of his iconic rockers, so I could make my own. 2/3rds of my furniture is Maloof style pieces that I have made
    1 point