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  1. I took these 3 picture in 2018 on our trip Ireland. Dunluce Castle, Northern Ireland, UK Kylemore Abbey, Co. Galway, Ireland Ha'penny Bridge, Dublin Ireland Believe it or not, these 3 are all taken on a Motorola G5 cell phone. I was contacted by the Ireland tourism people asking permission to use these photos in some brochures they were making after I posted them on a Irish Travel forum.
    10 points
  2. Next I did the draw bore pins a la Mike Pekovich. It's really handy to have multiple squares - one for the edge standoff, one for the top hole and one for the bottom. You may wonder why I have two Starrett 4" combo squares. I "lost" one last fall and after weeks of looking for it and finally buying a new one, found it in my apron - in the wrong pocket. I learned this little trick from a FW podcast a couple of years ago. I got a set of center punches from HF for ?? $12. The pin holes are ¼". With the boards clamped together, insert the 1/32" smaller size punch into the hole w
    9 points
  3. After a lot of hunting and clicking my wife and I were both able to get appointments and vaccinated. And now I am finally set up (with vaccination and liability insurance) to be a volunteer vaccinator with the Chicago Medial Reserve Corp. My first stint is Wed March 3. I am strangely excited about this opportunity to work for free. It's like I've been stuck on this sinking ship and now I've finally gotten hold of a bucket and I can take some positive action.
    9 points
  4. Got my first covid vaccine shot today. Feel good about that.
    8 points
  5. This is going to be a bit different of a project. Megan and I have discussed at length a means to provide a space for her to get ready but also be easily hidden. Our home office has a close that isn't very well utilized instead of piling boxes and totes there, we'll shift them to the now finished garage. A lot of discussion and talking lead to building a dressing/makeup vanity in the office closet. Not really sure how this is goign to end up. I'll be designing as we go. Main parts that I know I'll be making are a work surface, a rolling drawer organizer, and a mirror with lights. I starte
    7 points
  6. While finish was drying I continued work on picture frames. I can't remember who posted about the L fence but I ended up making an L type fence to trim the splines down quickly. That allowed me to clean the edges of the frames up with a hand plane. I just need to run them all through the drum sander to clean up the front surface then mount glass and backer boards.
    7 points
  7. Say no more! This is obviously a critical situation and justification for replacing a worn out tool! You are doing this for others and not for self gratification!
    7 points
  8. I'm charging them the going rate for 4/4 and 8/4 cherry here in Santa Fe, which is 10 times what I paid for it. Here's the link to the members only Becksvoort article - https://www.finewoodworking.com/2002/12/01/harvest-table The changes I made based on Alison's table were mainly dimensional and per the client. The Becksvoort table is too wide for their space. I'm also doing pull out supports for the drop leaves and they wanted a simple square edge rather than a rule joint.
    6 points
  9. I've posted a few photos in the What Did You Do Today topic, but I'm now far enough into it to start a simple journal. This is a "commission" for a neighbor - we're trading labor, he's going to do some stone work for me. The design is a merger of a sofa table Alison bought in the early '80s and a Christian Becksvoort design that was in Fine Woodworking Nov/Dec 2002. Because it's narrow, I had to veer away from Becksvoort's spinner supports for the leaves - just not room for the width of the leaves. I'm using some air dried cherry that I got from a Franciscan monastery that was
    5 points
  10. This is a Dendrobium orchid species. Blooming now. It is fragrant. Comes from Asia. Used in Chinese medicine.
    5 points
  11. I've been on my feet too long today. I read the header as Removing DUST from jointer infeed outfeed tables. I thought, "What kind of moron...?" I'd better not offer any advice.
    5 points
  12. Not much time in the shop today but I did get a start on some organization in my PantoRouter cart. I had never used the Kaizen foam before but it works pretty good.
    5 points
  13. Feels great to be working on a project instead of working on my shop. First one in a while - a simple harvest table for a neighbor. I can't wait until the overarm dust shroud (Grizzly) gets here. This saw makes some dust. Cutting mortises. Tapering the legs
    5 points
  14. I'm going to offer a very contrarian suggestion, just wax over it. Use a scotchbrite pad to remove any scale, but leave the fine patina, then wax it. This technique forms a protective layer that inhibits further rust quite well. Doing so purposefully, as with a vinegar / salt wash, is one way firearms were once treated to prevent rusting.
    4 points
  15. It's always good to know when you're on your game, and when you should just go have a beer...
    4 points
  16. I learned very quickly to trust Phinds in such discussions.
    4 points
  17. Oh, come on. Don't mince words!
    4 points
  18. It's my wood. Mine. Give it back. Sometimes called Texas ebony, maybe.
    4 points
  19. Got my first this morning. I even got a souvenir of the event.
    4 points
  20. At this point if you can spray them I would paint them the color she wants
    4 points
  21. Saturday will be two weeks after our second shot. Only side effects is that the doc said that I can hold off taking the little blue pill for another 20 years!
    4 points
  22. I've never been able to get consistent, accurate performance from the bin level sensor that came with my Oneida DC. It's always been prone tripping before nearly full, and much worse, not tripping when the bin is full. Oneida wasn't much help, they say that is just how it is. So, I ordered this beauty: It's a vibrating bulk solids level switch. That rod vibrates & when the dust level gets to the rod, it dampens the vibrations & closes the alarm contact. Accurate to within about a millimeter. This is an industrial item & new is somewhere north of 1000 bucks, but I go
    4 points
  23. That's how I've done it in the past. What I found, also, is that it's not uncommon for bradpoint tips to be a little off center, moving the start point in a direction you don't want it to go. The center punches are easier to align.
    3 points
  24. Keeping in mind the considered opinions offered by experts, I have remodelled the joinery as per the attached image. The bench top would rest on the short aprons through a micro angled dovetail ( more of a dado actually ). I hope this frame would now be strong and rigid. The overhang on one side is for mounting the vice. But for this, the top and the frame are flush. I thank all the masters for their advice. I would request a final opinion on this design.
    3 points
  25. I don't have a center punch, so I use the point of the brad point bit I drilled the holes with, then set the point back a 1/16th toward the shoulder.
    3 points
  26. You know tomorrow you're gonna find another one of those red templates. I know where everything is... And about how many layers it's under.
    3 points
  27. Yes, I steam bent kiln dried walnut, birch, maple, and exotics to make fishing nets. The strips were very thin so I had that going for me. Nonetheless I had to steam it for much longer than what is generally recommended on the internets. Some of my bends failed on the walnut so I steamed the devil out of it and it worked better.
    3 points
  28. Air-dried cherry - from 1982!
    3 points
  29. In my experience jumping from 120 to 220 grit is too much. I am pretty sure the pigtails are from the 120 grit, I suggest 120 - 150- 220, 0r 120-150-180 (You really don't need to go much finer than that). I have learned that getting past the 120 grit takes more sanding than most people think.
    3 points
  30. I laughed at Mick's story, but a few years ago I was on a ladder cleaning my garage gutters. Made a stupid decision and fell one story, backwards, landing on the ladder. I thought I was dead, pretty sure of it actually. Took a bit, but found out I was wrong when I started breathing again. I do not clean the gutters any more and I really really don't like ladders.
    3 points
  31. Got the slab joints sawed.
    3 points
  32. I think you were right, Chet. This was an extremely dynamic weather shift for us here in Arkansas in the last 48 hours. All that after our snow storm. The rust was dense but not thick thankfully. WD40 and a rag got it off and I put another paste wax layer on it. Thanks
    2 points
  33. Yes, they say Texas ebony, not lignum vitae and definitely not katalox.
    2 points
  34. I have a roubo and a twin turbo. I'd either do an end vise orientation and nix the wagon vise or corner opposite the leg vise. I have to disagree with the above about it replacing the leg vise. While i think it's similar there are tasks that a leg vise is better suited to that a twin screw wouldn't handle as well and tasks a twin screw handles well that a leg vise would struggle with. Material wider than ~10" where you need to joint the edge starts to put the board edge at a height that is uncomfortable to plane with a twin screw while a leg vise can handle that well. Leg vise doesn't han
    2 points
  35. Wait, you've honestly never said to yourself "this saw is too powerful/smooth/reliable"?
    2 points
  36. I think it might be mexican ebony. https://www.earlywooddesigns.com/pages/katalox-properties-info-uses#:~:text=Typically very dark black with,as hard as wood gets. See what you think.
    2 points
  37. I’ll be getting a California Air tools one once my pancake dies. I just got a cordless nail gun but for the amount of nails I’m shooting so quickly in a door a pneumatic is quicker and a lot lighter.
    2 points
  38. I will be demonstrating online live on March 7th 12 noon my compound veneering technique using a DIY compression mold. This technique will be a taste of what I will be teaching at Marc Adams School of Woodworking in October and will be in a upcoming article in American Woodturner; veneer a turned object. This will be a good one. Register HERE
    2 points
  39. That table has inspired plenty of people. Here’s my attempt in Mottled 12/4 bubinga for the top on a hard maple base. https://www.averagesavant.com/post/manage-your-blog-from-your-live-site
    2 points
  40. The bottom of a SawStop insert is difficult to replicate in a shop made wooden insert. If we limit the application to vertical cuts, and exclude maximum height of the blade, then the insert becomes much simpler, and still works most of the time. Wooden inserts have the advantage of zero clearance around the blade. Also they are quick to make and low cost so you can have one for each dado width. Drill pattern for SawStop insert is shown in photos below
    2 points
  41. 2 points
  42. Welcome! Given the racking forces of a bench I would think a mortise and tenon joint where you have glue surfaces on two sides would be better.
    2 points
  43. Well said! Welcome Harry! I would add that early in my woodworking journey I purchased tools well just becuase its what I thought I needed or I saw a review or becuase my friend had it, etc. Now I buy tools based on the upcoming project. I decide what I will be working on, whether I have the tool needed, if not do I have a tool that will work or is it time to purchase something. My ultimate goal is to build amazing things not collect tools, in my current flow that is just a happy by product
    2 points
  44. I may have a pic of it, I'll look. It was sold by the Ohio tool Co., but only the wooden parts were made in the prison, OTC sold it as a Second, "because" it was constructed by convicts. The ones they sold that were made outside of the prison were sold as new and top of the line at the time. I don't think the wooden body would cut through the bars or walls.
    2 points
  45. +1 on surface prep and paint. Best solution is probably new doors but her budget (and her ability to get her second cousin Cletus to pay for the damage he did) will drive that decision.
    2 points
  46. Well, that doesn't look like oak at all. And in my very un-professional opinion, it might be faster to make a new door than to clean up that mess. Has more than the one door been sanded and stained?
    2 points
  47. For your first hand plane, I suggest buying a (new) quality one. LN or Veritas, it doesn't matter. You CAN get by with a WoodRiver, they're really not bad and will likely get you 90% of LN performance at bargain. If you buy a vintage plane and try to tune it yourself, you'll likely not nail it and you need to feel/see how a quality plane is supposed to work.
    2 points
  48. Good news Ronn, we got our first last week, a small light at the end of a very long tunnel but it’s a start, and maybe my lumber guy will let me back in the building instead of bringing me out the wood he picks
    2 points
  49. I could have reduced the weight a lot more by doing more ribs in the middle and doing 1/4" for both the top and bottom or even 1/2" for the top. I used 3/4" because i had the plywood on hand and it's cheaper to use what you have then to buy new. The top weighs 35 lbs tops so moving it around and getting it into place was nice and easy.
    1 point
  50. Yes. The shank should be into the collet at least ⅔ of the length of the collet. That doesn’t usually give you much play, but if you pull it out too far you’ll spring the collet when you tighten it down. Once it’s sprung, it will never hold properly again.
    1 point