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  1. I just finished these two nightstands this past weekend. They are made of Sapele and finished with one coat of blond shellac and then I sprayed 3 light coats of General Finishes High Performance. I will be making the bed to go with them but won't get that started until June sometime.
    19 points
  2. It doesn't rain often around here but when it does odd things sprout up.
    18 points
  3. This was turned from a single piece of cocobolo 8 ½” square by 17/4. The surface is sanded to P1200, but with no coatings, just au naturale. With successive convolved designs I have been looking at what happens when the contour lines of the upright and basin are altered. With Sedona the upright and basin are both formed from straight lines. In many ways this shape was the most difficult convolved form to design, engineer and make that I have done so far. For one thing I had to be very particular about the acute angle in the corners. It’s about 40 degrees reflecting the fact that my d
    18 points
  4. As many of you know my father passed away a week ago Monday and as we work through the process one of the things that came up was the need for an URN for his ashes. The family decided to go with a wooden box type urn. As the funeral home showed us what was available they either looked really cheap or the prices climbed to the $1K range. Knowing my father (who was quite cheap LOL) I offered to make the the box and thought I would take you all along for the ride. First up was the design we wanted something clean and fairly simple yet nice. I decided to go with what I had in the shop so originall
    17 points
  5. My DIL has a sister (lives on the other side of the country) who is an extremely unfit parent, so they have taken on legal guardianship of he 7 YO son. So now I am his defacto grandfather. His other grandfather is a turd and has nothing to do with the boy. Anyway, they are camping with us and we went on a hike. He's never been camping or hiking and is loving it. We've really hit it off and enjoy each other's company a lot. Poor kid has been through a lot and it's going to take a lot of time and love to make things right. But he's a great kid and sure wants to belong to a family
    17 points
  6. This was a build for my dog agility instructor. Somehow over the years, The chess table that had been in her family got lost or stolen. She asked if I could make one for her and she wnated her parents initials in the top of the table. In the following pics t he chess squares are 1/42" carelian birch and walnut on Baltic birch plywood The frame is solid walnut. The playing surface is 16 x 16" and the table is 26" square overall. Frame is glued to the border with the addition of 3 dominoes along each side. I changed the domino depth setting just a bit beween drilling the boards and dr
    16 points
  7. About a year ago I read Nick Offerman's book. It's a pretty fun read if you have not read it. In that book, he has a picture of a table designed and built by George Nakashima. It's this picture: When I saw that picture I was immediately smitten with this design. To my eye this table is somehow both complex and simple at the same time. I knew when I saw the table I needed it on my todo list. I could not start on the table right away. I had to remodel our kitchen which took an incredible amount of time. I had to build some shelves. I also built a small counter top for our laundr
    16 points
  8. I started a new project/adventure yesterday. Of the four, my 10 year old grand daughter is the grand kid that has always shown the desire to learn woodworking, she is also the youngest. The intelligent questions that come out of her mouth can stun a college professor. So I decided to ask her what she would like to build, you know bird house, napkin holder, those kind of things. Nope, that wasn't going to work, she said with no hesitation I want to build a coffee table for my mom and dad. So that is the project. We spent some time looking at pictures of coffee tables on the internet
    16 points
  9. Our granddaughter’s other grandfather has a ranch in south Texas and loves to be outdoors. Her dad taught her to shoot at an early age and turned her loose in a blind at age 14 and scored this doe. This year, she was taken off of the doe, cull buck only list and got this 10 pt. fellow. She’s darn good at the pistol range too when we can find ammo.
    15 points
  10. Finally finished up the Shaker End Table from the Guild. Learned a ton, made my share of mistakes but overall I’m pleased with how it came out. My first time using cherry. Was just asked by SWMBO when her coffee table and TV stand will be done.
    15 points
  11. It seems strange that I've only been on this site for just six plus years. But it never lets me down, you old guys and even the new guys make this place enjoyable, and instructive. I've learned and grown in my woodworking thanks to all of you, and since today is Christmas eve, I just want to thank you all for your input, and wish each and everyone of you a very Happy holiday, and a Merry Christmas. You're a good bunch!
    15 points
  12. As some of you may recall ( or not), I Started taking on line carving classes from Mary May last spring and took a carving class at Marc Adams school from Alex Grabavotskiy this fall. So enough with just carving practice lessons in basswood. Here are some of my first carved piece. Sides have the background lowered leaving the carving. The rossetes on the doors are carved appliques carved separately. Cheap Woodcraft African Mahogany. Nice wood for carving.
    15 points
  13. Final inspection complete. The next phase begins: 2100
    13 points
  14. I have to share this news with you folks. In fact I think you get some of the credit for encouraging me. One of my pieces was chosen by the American Association of Woodturners for inclusion in the AAW's 2021 Member Exhibition, Finding the Center. I'm dumbfounded. I just had no expectation of being selected; I almost didn't enter. The piece they selected was "Offering", wip down to the bottom of the first page this journal to see some pictures: The exhibit is at the AAW gallery in Minneapolis and runs from Sept 5 to Dec 30, so I've got a while
    13 points
  15. I just completed a kitchen renovation. It took 51 days and mostly with out surprises but there were a couple of things that added to the adventure. One was some water damage around the sink and dishwasher but I was expecting this as we had some dishwasher problems about three years ago and this required some subfloor replacement. The other was when the counter tops were installed I had to move the plumbing around under the sink to line up with the new drain locations and the way the new garbage disposal installed. This was no big deal, I just don't like plumbing. Just because I am at
    13 points
  16. For the past 25 years, we have lived with these Ikea bench stools in our kitchen ... We do not eat much at the bench, but they get used. More recently Lynndy suggested that we replace them, and I thought that this would be a good excuse to build something inspired by Wharton Escherick, whose stools are just so organic and profound in their simplicity. The design was also influenced by a point made by Lynndy that a fixed-height footrest does not fit everyone. I thought about this and it occurred to me that the stretchers on the Escherick stools could fo
    13 points
  17. Finished! The bed is based on the Greene and Greene bed in the Gamble house. The house and the furniture were designed a built by the brothers. I did a modification to the foot board, because I'm 6' tall and tall foot boards are bothersome. Finished with shellac and wax. African Mahogany, Gaboon veneered center panel, and Danizia pegs and splines. I used the plans by Martin McClendon from FWW Jan/Feb 2013. I really liked that he used six spindles on each side for the queen sized bed, four just don't look right to me. Happy 4th! Sorry not a full project journal.
    13 points
  18. Alright, I have not been hiding, I've been varnishing my a*% off. Four coats top and four coats bottom after a lot of fairing and sanding of the epoxy base. After varnishing, on went the additions that make the boat complete. Here are the pics; Ready for the water, fully rigged and set up, just need to add the float bag for the front compartment; Handmade walnut handles drilled thru hull; Front bungee cords, left them a little long to see how it goes; Bungee cords again and hatch behind the cockpit; Hatch in place and off, you can see the
    13 points
  19. Okay, the last day started off by attaching the figure 8's to the base. Then center punching for the screw hole in the top. Then drilling and pre-threading the holes in the top. A final vacuuming of the parts before finishing. This next step is were she really left me impressed. I thought this is were she would have some struggles but after practicing the spray process on some spare plywood. I was real amazed at the job she did on the actual top. She was just a little nervous and asked me to spray the base. Spraying the bottom of the top.
    13 points
  20. This took 7 months to get to me.
    13 points
  21. Finally, after some danish oil on the trim ... it's ready. I've found before with cherry, that different boards can have a different colour when the finish is furst applied, hopefully as it ages, the colours will even out. Now I have to find out if it will fit through the door into the house ... maybe I should have measured that first!
    12 points
  22. My granddaughter turns 18 May 3rd, I know I got a project done early for a change amazing, I'm usually putting finish on the night before I have to give a gift. I'm happy with the table but, crazy about the finish (my daughter says she loves it) oh well to late to do anything about it. The table is knotty pine with a water based poly finish I made all the moldings on my new router table I'm loving that thing why I waited so long to build one..... I tried my hand at turning some drawer pulls I think they came out good for a first try the are made out of scrap 8/4 walnut.
    12 points
  23. Attached the bottom tonight and took some final beauty shots. Wish I would have had more time to play with some additional inlay strips recommended by Scott Grove but can't risk mucking this one up so I will probably make another similar one to try that on. That's a wrap! Thanks for following along
    12 points
  24. I took my son for his driving exam today, then whatched him drive home in my rearview mirror. His "new" car may be several years old, but you'd think it just rolled off the assembly line... Sorry, too dark for photos, this is a dealer pic.
    12 points
  25. I didn’t do a journal on here but I did snap a few pics along the way. The lumber was sourced from a walnut tree that I cut down about 6 years ago in Louisiana and brought back to Houston to be milled. I’ve made a couple of end tables from some of it but had several 8/4 slabs waiting on the right project. We had a new bathroom added to our house and decided I wanted to build the door going from our bedroom to the bathroom. Here are the slabs in rough form. And after I took a belt sander to them to see what kind of grain I had to work with. After milling to approximately 1
    12 points
  26. Off and on over the past 8 months I have been in the process of handing down my model trains (last used when I was a kid) to my eight year old Grandson. I re scued the oldest of my 3 trains from my sisters closet. It was reapinted yellow in the 1940's and the paint was flaking off. So I decided to bead blast and repaint it with Erie decals in memory of my fathers time with the Erie railroad. Here's on pic of this 100 year old train and two pics of all three: 1950 Diesel, 1934 Steam engine and 1920-ish electric. I think that I am having more fun than my Grandson.
    12 points
  27. Finished up the trim and made the marquee Then took some much deserved time off to watch football Well after 2 years and 2 months this build is officially construction complete! Thanks for following along!! Next up either xmas gifts or furniture not sure which but it will be a week or two...
    12 points
  28. I saw this table in PW about six years ago and finally got around to building it. The original plans were for a bow front; however, I elected to make a straight front. It’s made of Sapele with Bubinga Burl veneer. The construction is typical mortise and tenon except the upper front rail which is dovetailed. The biggest challenge was to incorporate the curved veneers into the lower rail. I’ve learned to back my inlays with balsa which makes the inlays more rigid and easier to outline before inlaying.
    12 points
  29. A super bandsaw box tutorial, watched this and was making boxes in a flash. Great technique if you haven't seen it before. https://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/06/07/episode-1-introduction-make-beautiful-bandsawn-boxes I grabbed a few chunks of wood and instant boxes; Thanks for looking.
    12 points
  30. I've been a little quiet on here lately. Since going back to the dental office, I've had 3 months of patients backed up. This has really cut into my free time so I'm needing this project to give me some sanity. After I finished my SUP (which I documented on here) in April, I had enough time and wood to build a second one before going back to work. They have gotten a lot of use since then, and their success got me wondering about building a Kayak (which might turn into plural in the future). So after doing the research, I decided to go the kit route. The kit will include instructions, glas
    12 points
  31. I've reached a tipping point with living with my 6" jointer and an upgrade has moved to the top of the tool priority list. I'm in a small basement shop so getting a big jointer in there is not realistic. A combo machine doesn't suit my workflow. So really the only option I have would be to build one myself, ala Matthias Wandel and John Heisz. Their builds used a cutterhead from a lunchbox planer. Matthias also used the motor from the planer, John used an induction motor. They both made the tables out of plywood skinned with thick sheet metal. That's the part that I really had misgivings
    12 points
  32. Quick update, the strip deck is just about completed. A lot of fiddling to get the pieces to fit and you really can do all of this by hand. I've been using a handsaw, block plane and rasps to fit together the strips. Here's were I'm at right now, hope to finish up the deck by the end of the weekend. Stern is pretty much done, 2 very small sections need to be filled in but I'll do that once I take the deck off for glassing; Bow is coming along; To fit together the pieces you need to cut your angles and make a cove where one is needed, rat tail rasp works great;
    12 points
  33. Only because I didn't want to disappoint you, Ken, I used mesquite for trim on the doors and stiles. And to top it off, I used Lone Star pulls.
    12 points
  34. 30 bdft of quartersawn white oak and 10bdft of maple from Bell Forest.
    12 points
  35. Made this one out of Red Gum for the granddaughter, hidden behind the drawer is a musical movement that starts and stops when the drawer is opened, the movement is from http://www.themusichouse.com , if you haven't had a chance to make a music box these are the best people to deal with, awesome folks and a wide selection of movements. not continuous grain all around just 3 corners, the wood is a little thick for my taste but this stuff warps pretty easy and i was getting some bad chip out on the planer so i quit while i was ahead. the drawer box is Sapele, finish is ARS, 3 coats, as always tha
    12 points
  36. Sandy listens to Ray Comfort and Kirk Cameron (www.livingwaters.com) sharing the Gospel every Saturday morning on YouTube while she makes our salads for the week so I made a passive speaker for her iPhone (and for her birthday). Curly Maple, Gaboon Ebony, and Curly Redwood, French polish finish. The difference in sound is very obvious - it’s richer, more balanced, and a little louder. Cold bending the Curly Redwood; I resawed to the point I needed and then soaked it in hot water. After three times and bending successfully more each time I cut the pieces I needed and then glued them toget
    12 points
  37. Your house maybe too small, or have hallways too narrow, for the typical demilune table. My wife wanted some thing for dropping keys and such so I made this. Cherry top and bottom with MDF core covered with a cherry veneer, maple legs, a small drawer in the middle for holding miscellaneous objects. It’s nothing special and not everything I wanted it to be, but it will do the trick. Attached to the wall with a keyhole and a pan head screw into the stud. I originally considered a four-leg design but this seem to work out more practical. Also, I attached the veneer using the thick white
    11 points
  38. I had the pleasure of a visit today from @Ronn W on his way back from woodworking school, great time, much wood talk, and a great lunch provided by my wife. Thanks for stopping by Ronn, always good to see you and talk wood stuff.
    11 points
  39. Ok I lied I have to post one more pic...on my desk the top really pops! Apparently I need to read up on lighting for photos LOL
    11 points
  40. Today I remade the box while still not perfect I can at least live with this one. 1 2 3 4 - you can see this one is still off, I should have changed my bandsaw blade to a new one but it will work. Next up I cut a dado for the inset top panel and hand fit it using a shooting board and #5 plane With that done I moved on to a bevel detail on the top and the bottom of each side. I clamped a quick zero clearance piece down to the router table to insure a smooth cut. The panels are square with about an 1/8" 45 bevel top and bottom. Th
    11 points
  41. Next I did the draw bore pins a la Mike Pekovich. It's really handy to have multiple squares - one for the edge standoff, one for the top hole and one for the bottom. You may wonder why I have two Starrett 4" combo squares. I "lost" one last fall and after weeks of looking for it and finally buying a new one, found it in my apron - in the wrong pocket. I learned this little trick from a FW podcast a couple of years ago. I got a set of center punches from HF for ?? $12. The pin holes are ¼". With the boards clamped together, insert the 1/32" smaller size punch into the hole w
    11 points
  42. I'm feeling pretty good today . . .
    11 points
  43. As you guys know I'm in the shop a lot, and as a result I generate a lot of scraps, mostly designated for the woodstove. That has always bothered me because some of the wood I burn is really nice stuff, it's just odd shaped or too small to do much with. Lately I've donated alot of my scraps to a few young budding woodworkers. This gets rid of a good amt of stuff and they are so happy to have it. But I still have that pile of wood, I'm sure we all have it, that pile of some nice pieces we hope we will find a use for in the future. Well my pile just seems to keep on growing despite my efforts to
    11 points
  44. Hello, everyone. I'd like to introduce myself. I'm an amateur furniture maker/designer. I live in Oceanside, CA, about 35 miles north of San Diego. I haven't been able to do much in the last year due to Covid-19 isolation issues (age and underlying medical issues), so I haven't had any opportunity to buy supplies. But I've just received my 2nd vaccination, so I hope life will be returning to some normalcy. I've included some images of my last project, a dining room side table of 8/4 Ash. The large dovetails were interesting to make and required construction of a hefty jig to hold the (hea
    11 points
  45. I've not made a large number of these stools, more like a half dozen, and so I hardly count as an expert here. There are others on the forums with so much more relevant experience. Past stools have used a scorp, pull shave and travishers to shape seats, and the legs were drilled with a brace and auger bit. Tenons and mortices were tapered with shop made reamers and tenon makers ... For this build I decided to go a different route, and combine power and hand tools. One reason was that the wood chosen was Hard Maple, which is a little more work to excavate than, say, a softwood s
    11 points
  46. 11 points
  47. I made this Sepele box because I wanted to try some different ideas. The top is shaped with a spoke shave, the indent in the lid was done with a core box bit and the the joint for the dividers in the box was done with a vee groove bit. I had seem Matt Kenney do this and thought it looked a little more elegant then a regular dado and the angles match the angles of the mitered corners. The lid handles are Wenge. The finish is one coat of blonde de-waxed shellac and a top coat of EnduroVar. Vee Groove detail. This seco
    11 points
  48. Can we get an oooh My new Blue Spruce mallet, cocobolo handle curly maple 16oz polymer infused head ...one of two birthday presents to my self My wife: Wow that looks way to nice to hit anything with Me: Your point
    11 points
  49. My daughter is in town. We went up to the nearest DQ for my now 13-year-old pup's birthday. Maggie got her own burger and her own ice cream cone! Then we headed home for ribs and margaritas. The weather was perfect.
    11 points