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  1. My daughter, who lives in Laos, brought this back as a Christmas present for me. It was carved in a village near where she lives. It's Burmese padauk / Pterocarpus macrocarpus, which in Laos is called maidu / maidou, which means "red wood". It's 6.5" tall and 7" long. Not sure what the tusks are made of but they appear to be wood. Probably just particularly clear sapwood of the same tree.
    13 points
  2. 12 points
  3. So I have been working on my workbench since May of this year and I am finally in the home stretch! I was a little nervous to do a project journal along the way as I was scared all I would end up with is an expensive pile of firewood and some metal for the scrap yard. I am to the point I can actually use it as a bench so thought it was a good time to share. Just have the bottom shelf, sliding deadman, and finishing left on the build. To me this project has been proof that if you put your mind to it and just take the time you can build pretty much what you want! Sure my bench might not be heirloom quality (there are gaps at some of the M&T joints, it might not be 100% square at a spot or two, and I messed up my math on the chop) but I had a blast building it, learned a million new skills, and it is way better than those old Kreg benches I had before!!!!
    10 points
  4. Finally got the new Nikon editing program loaded. Meet Jack future woodworker in Southern Iowa
    10 points
  5. The loot ... now I have to build a new shooting board ...
    10 points
  6. Spent some more time working on the @gee-dub designed clamp racks, when complete I hope to recover about 4' of wall and get my 6' and Dubuque clamps off the floor. Also shipped out the last of my Xmas gifts, its late but she was out of town anyway . I made five sets like this.
    10 points
  7. What goodies did you buy yourself or receive this holiday season? Early gift I received from a secret santa group.
    9 points
  8. Done with a day to spare! Thanks for everyone's help. In lieu of plywood, I went with frame and panel solid wood for the base, lid, and the tray base. Used dewaxed shellac as the finish. It really helped the figure in the maple stand out. Hope everyone has a good Christmas!
    9 points
  9. I'm as crazy about surf fishing as I am about woodworking. This winter I decided I would make a bunch of Classic Striper Coast surf lures, what better way to join together 2 hobbies. So after a bunch of research I got started and now I'm addicted. A lot of these classic wooden lures sell for $20 plus, and there is a growing group of independent producers cropping up all along the Northeast Coast. I don't plan to sell anything, but my fishing buddies are super excited that I plan to share my creations. Here are some classic designs, the Habs Needlefish, the Canal Hawg and a new classic the 2T Pencil; Some more Canal Hawgs, 2T Pencils and smaller Albie Pencils; A small school of Squids waiting to be employed; And finally, a production line started; So production starts with the design, then make a turning blank, thru drill that and then turn. Drill out you holes for hooks and weights. A dip in wood sealer, paint, coat of epoxy and then put together. It is very addicting!
    8 points
  10. I didn't think we needed another thread from me about urns so I will just tag these on here. Similar construction to the one above; dovetails this time. The top is a floating panel. The scribble on the piece of paper is the targeted profile. The joinery goes like so. And it ends up like so. Here I have it taped off as part of the finishing process. The bottoms are fitted as in the first one posted above. I cut the small rabbets with a FTG blade. You can see that I pre-finish the top edges of the boxes prior to assembly. I also pre-finish the panels. This prevents any peel-a-boo appearances of unfinished areas during wood movement. This one is black walnut and curly white oak. This one is black walnut and pecan. This is just the initial top coat. I'll add a pic once they are truly done with feet and all that.
    8 points
  11. Frames completed. Took a bit of risk since I didn’t have an upholsterer’s input, but I based it off of Bmac’s photos. Now, just waiting to confirm with an upholsterer, take it in for comments, and then final sand and finish before I bring it in.
    8 points
  12. Air dried walnut with a steam bent crest rail and rockers, curly maple spindles. I prefer to sculpt the seat with hand tools rather than a motorized grinder; it is less messy and noisy, and very satisfying. The first three coats were equal thirds BLO, turps, and vinegar. Since I used green and steamed material, the white vinegar acts as an anti-fungal. The remaining coats of finish will be 50/50 BLO and turps, at a rate of: once a day for a week, then once a week for a month, then once a month for a year, and finally yearly or as needed. This is the forty-third of this design I have built since 2017, so I have gotten the procedure and jigs/set-up down pat. The chair took 27 hours to build, and each coat of the finish takes me about 15 minutes to apply, and 25 minutes to wipe off and rub out. There is no way to speed the finish process, however, I do like the results.
    7 points
  13. Circling back to close this customer designed, horse tack, shadow box. Being picked up tomorrow. Open areas at top and center are for an embroidered team name tag off of a riding vest and some awards.
    7 points
  14. This will be my last update for about 2 months. My upholsterer told me that he would be ready for my project towards the end of February. I also just finished a matching ottoman. I figured a lounge chair would be even more comfortable with a foot rest. I just need to put on a finish coat of Polyx. I have one coat of Extra Thin on it now. I think the ottoman will give additional leeway for those with varying heights where they now do not have to place their feet on the floor. It should certainly be more comfortable. Finally, I included the fabric/color that I choose. See you in about 2 months, I hope.
    7 points
  15. I received the last couple of pieces for my no router table top and fence.
    7 points
  16. Quick win project between rounds of playing in the snow with my kids. We recently upgraded my middle kid from a toddler bed to a twin bed. We found a decent used wood bed with drawers below. One of the center support/guides for a drawer was broken so I made a new one. It was a nice opportunity to try out my new shop layout and DC setup. Broken piece had some crazy grain. New one made from a scrap piece of maple. Edges eased with my little stanley. Then a quick coat of shellac and then wax. In place and back in service!
    7 points
  17. Couple backorders were delivered on Friday!
    7 points
  18. Recently my father and I have decided we need to make some changes to the shop. With acquisition of some new tools and a significant increase in the use of the dust collector….it’s time to update some infrastructure. First and foremost………..decluttering horizontal surfaces beginning with a drill charging station. More posts to come as we try to make this single stall garage functional again.
    7 points
  19. Complete and ready to use!
    7 points
  20. Trying to take care of a few of those little things that never seem to get done. My Gluebots, glue stock and other random glue-up stuff was snow-drifting on top of my shooting board. Got tired of moving it all the time and used some scrap to make a cleat-hung glue caddie. At least now the things I use most often have somewhere to go and I know where to go to get them ;-)
    7 points
  21. I planed the walnut down to the thickness of the tabletop and using these screws, I used a Fortsner bit to recess the head about 3/4” into the edge of the board. I bought a 12” x 3/16” bit at HD and drilled thru the board and using some clamps and cauls to keep it lined up flush with the tabletop, I drilled the same 3/16” hole into the edge of the top. Prior to drilling into the tabletop, I marked each of the two boards and the top to make sure they went back in the right spot. Then back to the drill press I drilled a 1/4” hole in the board to allow clearance for the width of the screw. I did not make these holes oversized as I didn’t want any vertical movement when using clamps in the future so hopefully wood movement from the top is not a concern? As I didn’t want the holes to show and I didn’t have a walnut dowel that size, I decided to make the round holes square. As none of the square holes were exactly the same size, I cut the plugs for each hole and beveled the edges a tad. Then it was back to the table with the clamps and cauls and attaching the end boards and gluing the plugs in place.
    7 points
  22. Finished the clamp wall remodel Made a new mount for my security camera Set up the new planer and got the new dust collector hose in and installed. I forgot I need to add an outlet for it so I will need to run to HD to get wire later this week. Packaging was great everything looked good and in order but I will do a review once its up and running. Also used a bit of the bench cut off to raise it up I knew I saved that for something :) ALso started working on a replacement handle for the pattern makers vise the one included with the vise was pretty sloppy in the vise and driving me nuts so I turned a new one. Just need to turn and install the end cap. Original New one (need to cut the extra off the right that was for holding it on the lathe)
    7 points
  23. This is one element of a very larger project. The squares are of Honduran and African mahogany, and their grain directions are ninety-degrees offset from each other. I apologize if posting this many pictures is a violation of the etiquette of the forum. I thought that there may be a benefit to see the process.
    7 points
  24. I have some 7 week old brittany pups ready for a new home, don't you think it would make sense to be taking a bird dog to the park at the same time?
    7 points
  25. @h3nry That needs the new jealousy emoji! I got a Hershey bar with almonds and a KitKat bar from my grandkids. They bought them with their own earnings. First Christmas that they used their own money for presents. It was really good!
    7 points
  26. 2022 already? Happy New Years to all of you folks!
    7 points
  27. Image quality isn't so great. I was taking these with a 300mm (overkill but didn't' have time to switch), illuminated by just a flood light. It was fun to watch though. The snow is VERY crunchy and laying in bed Megan and I thought someone was lighting off fireworks. Nope it was just their hooves breaking through the ice on the snow.
    7 points
  28. 7 points
  29. The hinges mount into the lintel and threshhold. I'm sure that lining the top and bottom hinge accurately will be key ... so I measured twice, and then twice again, knowing that the doorway hole isn't quite square or plumb ... then cut mortices for the hinge parts. I fully expect that I will not have got the placement perfect and will have to move them slightly later ... but that's a bridge to cross later if needed. Then I cut the boards for the top and bottom of the case. and morticed the other side of the hinges into them. The bottom board fit nicely, but bacause the frame isn't quite square the top one didn't quite ... so I had to chop 1/4" of both. That's about as far as I got today ... I guess the case sides are next.
    7 points
  30. Since @Chet doesn’t trust me, here’s a picture. I try to refrain from posting pornographic images as much as possible, but sometimes my hands get tied.
    7 points
  31. I have had to accept that I need to empty one of the storage areas sooner than I need to spray finish so some lumber is going in that space . I have made several versions of this sort of rack. This one should only be in use for about a year so it is cobbled from items found. A piece of unused siding that has laid out in the rain a few times will make the tilted deck. Yes it is cupped from exposure to the elements. I clamped it to the bench to determine the height of the supports once it gets squashed flat by all the lumber. The kickers at the rear keep the boards . . . well . . . kicked out from the wall at the bottom. The wall rail is made from the same water damaged plywood that was leaning between a shed and a wall for a couple of years. We're talking quality materials here boys. The wall rail in this version is a sandwich of however many layers it takes to bring it into plane with the vertically stored boards. The sandwich gets fastened to the wall via some Spax fasteners. Heads recessed so they don't snag things. The object for me in vertical lumber storage is to keep the material upright. This is helpful in that there is no real lateral stress or heavy weights to muscle through when sorting stock. I rip a length of that same plywood, drill an appropriate diameter hole at the right height and connect the dots with the bandsaw. I didn't need many dividers for this 7' or so run but just made up what the one ripped off strip would yield plus a nicer piece that was my test divider. Due to its weather tolerance I had relegated a small cache of white oak to a less than stellar storage area. I thought it would be best to haul this stuff in first. The dividers are used to divide species, thicknesses or types (QSWO, RSWO, etc.). Over the years this has worked out for me elsewhere. You can see the unused dividers just rest in the wall rail. Schlepping this material a couple of boards at a time is a drag. After breakfast I will drive the truck down there and load it up for a more efficient point A to point B relocation method. A side benefit is that I can pick out material as I go for something I am planning for the living room.
    6 points
  32. I cut out the boards for the moveable shelves ... nothing exciting, just boards milled 6 square ... but a great excuse to use the new shooting board Then there was no putting off the glue-up much longer ... And finally the moment of truth ... does it fit in the door-frame ... yes!
    6 points
  33. I found some turning blanks stashed away on the shelf that had been there a few years, thought its about time to see what I can do with them. First one I think was Jatoba, though it had no id on the label. Mounted on a worm screw and turned a square edged bowl once done. The next one I decided to do it inside out so I turned the corners down as legs and made the bottom float clear of the table. Spalted ambrosia maple.
    6 points
  34. I created the first ever ojnab! What is an ojnab you ask? It's banjo spelled (and pronounced) backward and what it is, is an upside down lathe banjo. I bought myself this carving stand. The stand is intended to mount to a bench or be inserted into the lathe banjo. The lathe chuck then screws onto the threads and the stand can then hold the workpiece in a variety of positions for best access. I prefer to use the stand at the lathe, because I already have a dust hood there. Trouble is the workpiece ends up being so high up I actually had to stand on a block of wood to work on it. Then I realized that the banjo with its "smoke stack" design was contributing a lot to the elevation. What I needed was an upside down banjo, hence the invention of the ojnab. Basically it's a piece of plywood with a drilled out dowel attached perpendicularly to accept the post of the carving stand. But the difference in height compared to the banjo is about 3 inches. The work can be raised up if needed, and in fact the two U pins were made to raise it some without relying on the set screw, but I doubt I'll be using them though as it is still a bit tall for my stature. Way better than it was, though. Just what I've been doing this week.
    6 points
  35. This is what the three feet look like for a much larger project. Constructed from curly maple, African mahogany and gaboon ebony. The ebony ring pieces on the bottom are lap jointed together and I have those screws in oversized shank holes to allow any, (although minor), seasonal movement. The top layer is also screwed into place due to the end grain base of the polar core. The carriage bolt and threaded t-nut will allow me to level the project, in addition the head of the bolt keeps the ebony off of the floor by about 3/32". In my experience, ebony can be quite brittle and susceptible to chipping. Even though I did slightly dub the edges I think this adds a bit of buffer to that kind of damage.
    6 points
  36. Had my dad come over yesterday and help me glue this up. Definitely glad he was here and has experience in woodworking. We were able to glue it all up. The mitered plywood pieces helped except one side where one broke off. Glad we had the long clamps ready as they were needed for the part that broke off Just measured it again and it’s square with the front side somehow 1/16” longer on the diagonal than the back. I ended up 5/16” wider than my drawing so I’ll have to remember that when it comes time for the legs.
    6 points
  37. I was thinking the same thing, I would probably frame the empty wrappers.
    6 points
  38. Rabbeting the case for the plywood back ... the side pieces were straightforward with the rabbet plane but the top and bottom rabbets need to be stopped at both ends, so the plane is impractical ... an easy task for a router, but for some reason I masochistically persist in using chisels ... And finally for today some boards need thicknessing ...
    6 points
  39. I could learn to dislike you Coop, last week it was picking a bucket full of tomatoes now lifes struggles in 84* temps. Meanwhile it has been snowing here all day and is currently 5 degrees with who knows what kind of wind chill. If you ship me some of those tomtoes I may reconsider.
    6 points
  40. I got reminded why my Lazy boy rocker is called Lazy boy. Just got back from visiting my daughter's family in North Carolina. Looked around the town and found sawmill that will sell me the entire log if I don't mind green and rough. People there were really nice.
    6 points
  41. A new toolbox for my growing packout system. I'm setting this one up for electrical tools.
    6 points
  42. Whiteside “ultimate” flush trim bit, 7/8” diameter, 1 1/8” cutting length. I do a lot of pattern routing and I’m hoping this bit lives up to its name.
    6 points
  43. A couple late arrivals Just waiting on a couple more pieces for the Router table table top and fence take 2
    6 points
  44. Well I finally got around to adding the leather today went with contact cement and it worked great, thanks for all the suggestions!
    6 points
  45. Taking advantage of some if my end of year vacation time. Everything sculpted and sanded to 150 grit.
    6 points
  46. My shop is now complete! No more Woodworking items! Until I’m influenced by another one of you yahoos on a must have item.
    6 points
  47. I think my new shop will be my Christmas gift(s) for many years to come.
    6 points
  48. Just checked my email and apparently I won a drawing for a free BCTW HP-8 mini block plane!
    6 points