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  1. Like I mentioned before a lot of the parts for the headboard were done at the same time as the footboard because of using the same set ups for both. The only part that still need to be made was the top panel. The panel had a curve at the top and again because of the space in my shop I couldn't use the bandsaw for the cut so I used my jigsaw. I cleaned up the edge with a spoke shave. At this point I was like a horse headed for the barn and ceased to remember to take any pictures, but basically the only other thing I did before starting all the glue ups was to cut a rabbet along the bottom of the curved top panel and the top edge of the top rail to glue the two pieces together. The rest of the glue up was the same as the footboard. Completed headboard. My intention was to have the top panel have a recessed appearance similar the top drawer of the nightstands with the same band of molding right below it. Monday we emptied to bedroom and I shampooed the carpet. Then yesterday I set everything up. This picture got taken before the slats were in place. And the new mattress arrived this morning. The nightstands have gained a rich dark color since bringing them in the house, I can't wait until the bed is the same. We just need to find a bed spread that we or at least my wife is happy with and that will be the end of this project. This was an interesting milestone, with the exception of two couches and my wife's piano all the furniture in our house has now been made by me.
    13 points
  2. This is number 41, and I have decided to call it “My Scars Are Me”. The name deserves a little explanation. I purchased the wood from an estate sale, so I don’t know what it is exactly. It was labeled Australian burr, but I’m given to understand that Australia is actually host to more than one species of tree. But it certainly is a burr with lots of bold swirling grain, as well as bark inclusions, knots and other defects large and small. As I began to work the wood I was at first concerned that the inherent defects would not only result in a frail piece, but would also preclude a silky smooth finish. As I pondered filling them with epoxy, I realized that all these features didn’t just make the wood visually more interesting, they were in fact what made the wood. They were the wood’s substance, what it was composed of. This piece of wood is, just as you, I and everyone are, the sum of its scars. It is the “slings and arrows” endured that have fundamentally been the niduses of our own creation. It measures 4 ½” x 9”. It’s sanded to P600 and there is one coat of Osmo Polyx-Oil satin.
    13 points
  3. It is finished. At last! The suspended shelf leaves room on the lower shelf for a couple pairs of shoes, and a pair of tall boots, if desired. Glad to get this one done. I have to say, I am not a fan of brushing the GF High Performance poly. Dries so fast, and gets foamy in the brush if you work it too much. I'm accustomed to laying oil poly on with a rag, very thin. Does HP do better in thicker coats?
    11 points
  4. Niagara falls at sunset.
    11 points
  5. Being recently retired and having the fall garden planted, I needed a good Woodworking project to keep me occupied. Marc has always had a good array of builds so I thought I would check it out. As we have recently enlarged our house to include a larger patio, I chose a build by Matt Cremona. Matt’s build is a sitting bench made from thermal treated Ash. His final summation of the wood, made me go in a different direction, so I chose to build mine with cypress. Matt also stated that his bench is made for him being a little shorter in stature. I found that to be true after assembly and extended the legs of my bench by 2”. I drilled the bottom of my legs with a 3/8” bit and added a 2” piece of mahogany, supported by a 3/8” stainless steel dowel. All jointery is with epoxy. The back is jointed via Dominos and all other is mortise and tenons. I added about 1/16” of epoxy to the feet for moisture prevention.
    10 points
  6. I remember posting a shop-tour-2018 and a few folks commented that it looked a bit claustrophobic . . . understatement. I wish I had video of me building a project in that shop. At high speed it would look like I was doing some techo-dance moves the way I had to Outside Turn, Pirouette, Inside Turn my way through the shop. The biggest gift to myself in building this shop is space-to-work. Still in motion but, here's some more progress pics. The Dual Reverse Giggle Bearing Influx De-modulator . . . I mean the ceiling plate to flex to EMT section. Inside the wire ways. It's starting to feel like home. Milling area looking toward the jointer. Milling area looking toward the planer. 90 more degrees clockwise. The tablesaw area looks the same but has new power cords run. Most importantly I jointed a board, planed it, re-sawed a plank off and sanded it testing all the blast gates and dust collection. Although a few machine are still using 4" hose I will call the DC a success so far. Shop made 6" hoods will bring the jointer and planer to 6" direct connections.
    10 points
  7. Got a chance to trim the leg 'filler' sticks, and apply some bead pieces this morning.
    10 points
  8. I wanted to hike a trail to the Bubbles. I some how convinced Megan. Going up looked like this. Then this. Towards the top the trail started to look more like this. It was .5 miles and 515 feet of elevation gain so a somewhat easy trail compared to some but it still left me quite tired. The view was worth it.
    10 points
  9. The right end of my tablesaw has always been no-man's-land. I used to use that area for ducting, electrical and a gateway to the Twilight Zone. That area is now wide open and requires a change in my thinking. I have things that stay at the saw like . . . . These items used to hang from the side of the cyclone that was ear-blisteringly close to the tablesaw operator position on the right side. I have planned a swath of wall behind me for such things in the new shop but then I notice the right end of the saw as it appears now . . . Some scrap strips and some of that pegboard my dad got scads of for free when a paint store was going out downtown . . . we're talking the '60s here. Dad stored and used it for years. I got a couple dozen 2'x4' panels when he was thinning the heard years ago. Still using it . . . Anyway . . . presto.
    9 points
  10. Well it was a busy summer at work, and in my personal life, but I did get a few things done and just returned from my second week at MASW working on the Michael Fortune #1 chair. To date I have about 150 hours into the chair and I suspect I have another 50-75 hours to go. At this point all joinery is cut and the bottom is glued up. First up was to glue up the chair seat frame with nothing straight or square it requires jigs and cutoffs to insure a good glue up Next up was to shape the front legs. I used a die grinder, spokeshaves, rasps, & card scrapers for this task as well as a modified bar clamp to hold the work. Makes a pretty good pile of shavings/ scrapings After glue up I worked on the leg to stretcher joint using rasps, rifflers, & scrapers Then more shaping on the glued up seat With that roughed out I started cutting the joinery on the back legs using custom made jigs and a router Then a quick dry fit T Then I cut the flats that will mate up with the arm on the table saw using a sled and stops Laid out for shaping Once shaped it was ready for glue up and I cannot tell you how stressful this was LOL. There is a lot going on so a dry run is mandatory. Mine came up well and now for the first time I could actually see some progress I started working on the arms next cutting the flats for both the arm/leg joints as well as the arm/crest rail joints. The first on the bandsaw and the later on the table saw. Sorry I didn't get pictures for all of this. Next I laid out shaping lines And that's about it for now Here is the current state
    9 points
  11. Prior to building my Roubo Bench I had a bench made out of Noden Adjustable legs and a cheap top I bought at Woodcraft well after using this primarily as a glue up station for many years I have decided to change it up a bit. Earlier this year a purchased a couple of new vises; a pattern makers vice and also a gun stock vice I will mount them on this bench while continuing to use it as a glue up table. I need to beef it up a bit and also will add a till to the back side. Bench when I started Vises waiting for install First up I reduced the size of the top while squaring up all the edges. I used my Festool tracksaw and TSO track square to do this. Ultimately the bench will stay 30" deep and grow to 62" wide Next I sanded off the finish from both sides of the top Then I made a jig to cut the tenons on both ends, doing it this way insures the top and bottom will match. Routed the tenons wondered why the dust collection was so bad... Huh that might explain it Next I set up the Panotrouter for some box joints quick easy and strong I used dominoes to align the front skirt so I could get the length measurement This where I ended up tonight. Hoping to finish this week but we will see. I would like to get back to my chair build but want to use the vise for that so decided to knock this out quick.
    8 points
  12. No, not Depends. get your mind back in the shop . I have a small shorts issue. Maybe a medium shorts issue. OK, a definite shorts issue. I controlled this at the previous shop with my "shorts tower". I had selected the location for the tower in the new shop long ago. When things get tall where I live they get secured. When securing for earthquake you are not so much trying to hold the item up as you are trying to prevent it from getting the idea of leaning over as far as the tipping point. That is, keep it from rocking. Imagine my surprise when the location I picked on paper before the slab was even poured turned out to line up with the previous pocket-holes-into-studs I had used for this purpose at the old shop. What are the chances? The boxes are screwed together and secured to the wall every other box or so. As you can see these are made from scraps found, donated, roadkill, whatever was at hand. It finally ends up here and there's one more thing off my list.
    8 points
  13. Well, if I am down to caulking door trim and touching up paint I guess this journey is over. Thanks to everyone that tagged along, gave me ideas (knowingly or unknowingly), and encouragement. Anything that happens from here on will be considered an actual shop activity and will get its own thread if deserving. Thanks again!
    8 points
  14. Forgot to put the feet in the pic. You’re probably better off that I did. It finally got down to fire pit weather.
    8 points
  15. Megan and I stumbled upon a beautiful park in New Hampshire. Chesterfield Gorge State Wayside. The sun was just right and i got some awesome pictures of the creek. They ended up looking quite surreal and fake but I like it. This one is in the Niagra Falls park, just upstream from the American Falls
    8 points
  16. We drove to Bryson City and rode the train today, had their “Shine and Dine” ride. Sampled moonshine and had barbeque during the ride. Very rainy first half of the ride, going back the sun came out. Going to try the skyway on the way home, hoping for a bit of a break in the rain tomorrow by the time we get in the high grounds. Thats blueberry flavored shine One of the cars on the train. They made them elegant back then!
    8 points
  17. Right now my wrenches are on my bench. I spent a good part of the weekend cleaning them and painting the engravings to improve visibility.
    8 points
  18. Quick shelf to replace the awful wire shelf in our laundry room. The shelf is primarily used for holding our kids’ craft supplies and the wire shelf is on the verge of falling on someone. Maple ply with solid maple edging. I will also have solid maple under the entire length of the back and sides to support it, with two 45* supports (also maple) toward the middle. 74” wide and 16” deep. Finished with shellac spray for speed.
    8 points
  19. Technically it’s not in the bench yet, but will be soon. Think it’ll cover the rest of my projects for the year.
    8 points
  20. I seem to have good luck solving dilemmas while in the shower. I was told that it's not uncommon because a shower tends to relax you. Trouble is my paper and and pencil get wet when I try to write the solutions down.
    8 points
  21. This kinda counts? Boothbay.
    8 points
  22. She’s an absolute beaut my friends! Still getting it all set and tuned up. Ended up getting the resaw king and a half inch blade for special purposes, have no idea what I’m going to use it for yet but by god I have it lol. Don’t mind the messy shop, doing some reorganizing and shuffling of equipment.
    7 points
  23. Lots of putting things away and throwing things out so not a lot to show . . . that shows. Upped the jointer to 6". The difference in performance? Substantial!
    7 points
  24. I built one new spec house a year, for 33 years. 1994 was the year that Virginia Beach was going to start pulling a million gallons of water a day out of the lake, for their drinking water supply. It was the only year, recession, or booming economy, that the local economy wasn't running WFO, and came to a standstill. After it became apparent that the water withdrawal didn't amount to anything, it's been WFO ever since. By then, I had been building 3,000 square foot homes, with basements. I decided that year to not buy one of the best lots, and build a small house, just in case I had to sit on it for a while. I built a 1400 sq. ft. house on a mid range lot on a cove. That lot has no view of anything but that cove, but has a decent low slope to it. I paid 35k for the lot. Last Summer, one of the steep lots, that we thought no one would ever buy, sold for $265,000, that had sold for 10k back in the '70's, and they built a giant house on it-just for relative changing values to the times comparison. I built that house, and added a large addition onto our barn that year for 130k. I decided to put a price of 265 on it, and put my For Sale sign at the road. It sold that weekend after I put the sign on it. It's a well built little house, with custom everything, and a large, 30x32 two car garage. I always built the garage first, to use as a shop. The guy that bought it was another builder. He bought it to live in himself. He said he'd never seen a house that well built. He ended up dying after falling off a ladder building a shop for himself, and his Wife sold it 20 years ago. I don't know what it sold for that time. Anyway, fast forward to a few weeks ago. A Realtor advertised it for sale, with viewing on Saturday. Cars lined up in the street near it, and offers started coming in. They had listed it for 825. They had offers of 850, and 885. It sold that afternoon for $890,000. I'd like to say that it was because it was built by me, but I think it's just a crazy market, in general.
    7 points
  25. I finally got pictures of the completed bathroom. Complete with an electric toilet seat!
    7 points
  26. More like the Dopey Decimal System
    7 points
  27. As promised, here are a couple of photos of the completed audio rack with gear in place -
    7 points
  28. We did make it to the Skyway, it was raining most of the way and quite a bit of mist and fog. I did get a few shots on the Nikon and a few on the Iphone camera. Deep Creek area Lake overlook Got to revisit Bald River Falls. I was able to sit the camera on one of the concrete pylons on the bridge and shoot at 1/5 second @f/16 with the EI set at 100.
    7 points
  29. My compadre and I took the fence carriage off the jointer and then took the jointer off the base. This allowed us to muscle it onto a dolly and get it into the shop where we reassembled it. Flush with our success we refer-dollied the bandsaw out to the shop. We then surveyed the 600 lb planer . . . hmmm . . . I called my son in law. He muscled it onto a dolly he had brought along and wheeled it out to the shop in nothing flat. We got a little work done on the power as well and hope to have both power risers live by EOD tomorrow.
    7 points
  30. The second vertical member is in. This was delayed while I experimented with 2-1/2" tablesaw-overarm / router-table-fence collection versus 4". There's a ton of math you can throw at dust collection but I just went for plain old empirical data. That is; a real world test. The 2-1/2" proved best for me in this installation. That picture makes it look like the overhead is "T" connected. It is actually like so . . . You can just ignore the temporary tape and what-not; this is a mid-fabrication shot . I used commercial plastic blast gates in these positions. I had them on hand and things got a little crowded and clumsy when I tried to fit the self-cleaning style that I make myself. We'll see how this goes. A shop is always evolving so if an alteration is required later on it won't be the first or the last. The 2-1/2" hose will also serve the tablesaw overarm in some fashion as yet to be determined. It won't be green painter's tape . Velcro straps are likely the solution here. The aperture into the guard is quite small so I may have to field modify the hose attachment location as well. I don't use the overarm a lot but time will tell. I am now ready to build out the electrical wire ways that will serve the two groups of machines. First I want to play with the 8" adjustable elbow at the DC exhaust to see if I can make the noise more acceptable.
    7 points
  31. The router table duct will run nearly on the ground with a 3/16" strip between pipe and concrete. The tablesaw duct will run parallel to this for most of the distance. I was pondering various straps and brackets to hold all this securely. I gave it up yesterday and decided to sleep on it. Is it wrong that I do my best thinking when I am asleep? I decided to do this . . . you set up your tablesaw for cove cutting and take after a piece of stock. The thickness at the thinnest point is 2-7/16". This just turned out to be the measurement accommodating the wye positions and the height of the tablesaw port. The tablesaw duct sets on top like so. I cut the blank into three sections. These have a blob of silicone glue where each pipe sets in the "cradles" of the blocks. This is certainly more than enough support vertically. If the pipes aren't secure enough for my liking once the silicone cures I can add straps.
    7 points
  32. My first step in setting up a tablesaw is to assure it is in the right spot. Once all the hardware gets bolted on these things get a bit awkward to shift around. I go for level on tablesaw bodies before I add anything else. This gives me a reference point for everything that comes after. For those who haven't done this a few times here is a method I use for putting on wings. A piece of scrap a bit wider than the wing holds it roughly in place while you pinkie-tight the first few bolts. This assumes you put the fence rails on before the wings. Once I have the left wing on and true I add the right. I have enough cast iron sections to build out the side table area. I have done this on other saws and the increased mass is welcome. It will also solve the only bad thing I have ever had to say about the 3HP PCS Saw Stop; the side table is chintzy, made of too soft of a wood for the frame and is basically strong on "show" and weak on reliability. I posted earlier in this thread about my paper dolls for grown ups. They were definitely worth the little time they took to make.
    7 points
  33. Yeah it's made of mud and grass. I think we have both purple martins and house martins. I see some that are blue and black. I also got a couple good ones of some turkey in out yard. I kind of like this one, I think because it reminds me of the wooden cutouts I see that are painted to look like people bent over working in their garden.
    7 points
  34. @Belle City WW I will look back through my SketchUp stuff and see what I have. Probably not highly detailed but, could be helpful. There have been many highlights during this project. Also many compromises and work stoppages. For all the many ups and downs, for all the major phases: framing, electrical, insulation, drywall, and paint . . . for some reason, this . . . has hit me as a major milestone(???).
    7 points
  35. Worked on the bowl a bit more. The goose-neck scraper seems to be the best tool I have for cleaning up the inside. I trimmed the outer shape, and did a little sanding before my time was up.
    7 points
  36. I just want to say I been very busy for a long time with Barbara,s care. Haven been here much because of it. I do feel good about I took care of her with no help except hospice near the end. I do need to keep it together and get back to work very soon. Plenty of time at night to get upset.. I want to thank everyone for what they have said and done and I really mean it guys.. I will see you guys later today after I get some things done.. Mark
    6 points
  37. Maybe worth posting - Dust Bin Bag Holder Thingy. My method to date for cyclone dust bin bag management has just been to keep an eye on it till enough spoil is in there to hold the bag well. With the DC out in a shed this would be problematic. Granted I am one of those that sometimes solves a problem no one has but, this has been planned for a couple of years. Finally . . . Measure the circumference of your barrel. Add about 6" for overlap. Measure the depth. I left it about an inch short in case any bag material or spoil got trapped under it. Grab your FRP panel that has been patiently waiting in the garage since 2019. Cut your strip to size. Test fit, clamp to hold position and mark for rivet positions. Grab that handy pop rivet kit you can't remember why you bought but use at least once a decade. This one is from Sears back when you could walk in, buy a discount tool, and expect it to work for awhile. I chose to use a washer on the inside of the rivet to provide more grip on the fiberglass panel. Drill a hole, push the rivet through, place the washer over it and cycle the tool. . . A post riveted test fit. I drilled a couple of holes on opposite sides of the fiberglass tube and slipped sections of rope through to act as handles. I failed to take a pic of this for some reason. Oh well, slip the tube into the bag and slip the whole rig into the barrel. . Wheel the new conglomeration out to the shed and install the barrel. . That's one more off the list!
    6 points
  38. 6 points
  39. Glenn, is the floor space filling up pretty much as you expected? I’m pretty much a creature of habit in that when I put my machines in place, although all are on casters, they have stayed in their original position, moved only for cleaning then back again. The only exception is my drum sander on a cabinet that gets rolled around quite often to allow more room for longer pieces on my ts and to provide better access to my bs. In one of your pics above, I see the orientation of your drum sander next to your bs and I thought, that makes better sense. I just rotated my drum sander 90* and it gives me another 12” clearance to the infeed side of my bs and a complete clearance for longer cross cuts on my ts.! Wish you had built your new shop 10 years ago!
    6 points
  40. Got my tracks for my Festool track saw as well as my TSO guide rail square. Both were suggestions from @Chet which I really appreciate. Currently working on installing some shelving in my garage for storage, and the track saw was incredible at breaking down sheets of ply. I haven’t ever felt that safe breaking down ply when I used my shop-made track and circular saw. Such a great purchase, if only to help me keep all my digits.
    6 points
  41. Shelf completed and installed. The excessive amount of holes from the wire shelf are from the prior owner. I won’t take credit for that! Just need to put plugs in to hide the screws.
    6 points
  42. I'm continuing to move items out as their spots become ready. It's getting to look more and more familiar. Here's a shot of the access way for the ducting created by the outfeed top butting against the tablesaw rear fence rail.
    6 points
  43. I got away with some woodworking trips. I made a quick trip by LN and got a No. 101. I've had this on my christmas list for years and no one wanted to buy it for me. Some rain rolled in and we drove around. I found a small lumberyard that advertised interesting lumber. I stopped in and grabbed a pair of book matched birds eye hard maple slabs. I unfortunately had to cut them down. I didn't want to drive 2,000 miles with them sticking out the back of my pickup.
    6 points
  44. I tried trimming more off the bowl with my bandsaw. Forgot pics, sorry. Works, but I need more practice to get smooth with free-handing a non-flat object. Drawing the work backwards across the teeth is good for smoothing faceted cuts. In the end, I used a combination of bandsaw, belt sander, block plane, rasps and sandpaper glued to a board. The shape is about as good as I'm gonna get it. The rim needed leveling. Old Number 7 worked well for that. Now for a discovery.... I needed to glue up a couple boards to make the shelf. Feeling lazy, I just used the crosscut blade, already mounted, to rip the live edges off. This home center blade, a 60-tooth 'Spider Tarantula' from Lowes, made an amazingly smooth rip. Can you find the seam? Just to prove it wasn't glued yet, I shot this. So one more rambling revalation. Even though it isn't perfectly symmetrical, the left-over piece of molding makes a good sanding block for the working pieces.
    6 points
  45. This is when it would be nice to have a remote for the drill press so you could leave the room will operating. After the operation was complete it would just be a matter of patching hole in the shop wall and maybe a little touch up paint on the other tools.
    6 points
  46. My purple martins started arriving in late February and left in late July. This was taken 5-31-21.
    6 points
  47. There isn't enough room in the shop so I moved it out in front of the garage to be able to get a decent picture of the finished product. The headboard should go faster because I think I have worked out most of the kinks in the process.
    6 points
  48. I have to do some catching up on this journal. There was one more thing I had to do to the legs before gluing the footboard panel section to the legs. I had to cut a deeper mortise to provide clearance for the male portion of the hardware. I did this by placing the female piece in its mortise and tracing the slot. After I traced it I flipped the piece end for end and traced it again, this gave me the proper length for the mortise. I used the double fence with my router and a 1/4" up spiral bit. And this is the completed mortises in a mortise. After this I finished up a couple of things on the sideboards. First, I put a 3/8 dowel an inch back from the end. I did this from both sides instead of drilling one hole all the way through because the bit wasn't long enough. The reason for the dowel is I am screwing the hardware in place with 1 1/4" screws and the dowels will give the screws something a little more substantial to bit in to other then just the end grain. I start by using my dowel jig and then complete the hole after removing the jig. Glue the dowel in, flush cut it and sand it smooth. The last thing was to attach the ledge that the slates will rest on. When I did the glue up for the legs I didn't have any clamps long enough and I don't have enough of the proper length to even hook two together. So bought some good quality load straps which worked out real well. And it made cleaning up the little bit of squeeze out pretty easy. I did glue on the bottom molding for the legs before attaching the leg. This allowed me to glue it on with the leg standing on the flat surface my assembly table. This is the bottom of the leg. When the panel and leg glue up dried I did the top cap and molding on the two legs. I glued the pyramid cap on to the to of the leg, then the first molding is about an 1 1/2 strip with a cove at the top that blends it to the pyramid. After this I attached a second piece that has a chamfer on top and cove on the bottom. This is the results. And we are on to the final sanding a finish process.
    6 points
  49. @curlyoak Priorities shift based on the ability to get things done by others. Current layer cake of honey-do's is to trick out the kitchen cabinets (custom features and so forth), redo the cabinets in the baths after someone else remodels them, then make a full bedroom set while the master bedroom is getting re-done (by someone else). The honey-do's will wait on some shop fixtures to some degree. I have a few items that need to be made for the shop in order to start some parts of things for the house. I foresee a lot of tandem activities ;-)
    5 points
  50. Figured some here might find these interesting. A seequence of a house martin feeding it's young.
    5 points